It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Mysterious Origin and Supply of Oil

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 05:55 PM
link   
It runs modern society and fuels serious political tension. But where does oil really come from, and how much is left? The far-out possibilities might surprise you.

Nature has been transmuting dead life into black gold for millions of years using little more than heat, pressure and time, scientists tell us.

But with gas prices spiking more than $1 per gallon in the United States this year and some experts predicting that the end of oil is near, scientists still don't know for sure where oil comes from, how long it took to make, or how much there is.

A so-called fossil fuel, petroleum is believed by most scientists to be the transformed remains of long dead organisms. The majority of petroleum is thought to come from the fossils of plants and tiny marine organisms. Larger animals might contribute to the mix as well.

SOURCE





posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 06:04 PM
link   
Immanuel Velikhovsky, in "Worls in collision", had a very strange hypothesis on the origine of oil : it would come from a comet !
As well as the water of Mars could have been swept off by the by-passing of a comet or a planet, the oil surrounding a comet or a planet could have been swept off from itself when by-passing Earth.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 06:11 PM
link   
Dude, its the waste of the Super-humans that live in the Hollow Earth. They just pump it up into a drillable core for us. They're actually a pretty nice species if you think about it. And since I wrote this down, on the internet, it's true. JK but I'm not ruling out Hollow Earth Here. Maybe it's the opposite of alchemy.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 06:14 PM
link   
I like the notion that a lot of the oil is a result of comet and meteorite impacts. Hydrocarbons are relatively abundant in space rocks, and it makes sense that if you slam a lot of them together and put them under some good pressure and heat, they'll pool in various spots under (and above) the ground.

Meteorites and comets. Not dead dinosaurs.



new topics

top topics
 
0

log in

join