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WIFI - Conspiracy or Scam... ?

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posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 11:29 AM
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blogs.zdnet.com...

I'll be honest here.... I havent had a chance to analysis this data... if you guys can deduce Conspiracy -- because we already know its a scam -- a corporation is running it... there are more ways to skin a cat than you might think...




posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by BornPatriot
 


But what if you're like me where you can just steal the wifi from a neighbor? ...much like I'm doing now.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 11:58 AM
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Interesting little read there.
As for conspiracy vs. telecom greediness, I'd lean to the latter.
The article doesn't and should make clear from the getgo they're referring to G3 networks- not WIFI. Maybe I'm wrong here but that's what I concluded by the end it the article.
The numbers they present are egregious but they're providing a service you contracted with them--agreeing to their pricing.

My advice- settle for actual WiFi. I have an iPod Touch that can tap into any WiFi network that's free or if I have a password. I just bought a pair of amazing headphones for $80 bucks from Apple with great audio as well as a remote to FF, RR, Play, Pause tracks as well as the microphone built in.

store.apple.com...

Using Skype on an iPod app called Fring, I set up a $3US/month plan w/ unlimited calls and voicemail- just need a Wifi network. I then paid $30 (for the next year) for a local area code telephone # people can call me at and leave messages. I can also send and receive all the free Texts I want. Personally I don't even like phones that much and who really needs to be contacted all the time anyways-ER docs and that's about it.

If you have an iPhone you get an additional app to use this software on 3G networks ie make unlimited calls anywhere for $3/month.--Sweet Deal eh?
So I guess it's all about consumer savvy vs Corporate savvy. If you want them to sucker you into a ATT plan for $60 or whatever go ahead--Ill choose to get the milk for free.
The real WiFi conspiracy is radio waves turning your brains to mush and Big Bro monitoring your online trafficking. People should start a anti-Wifi movement.

But again, I think this article is about 3G not WiFi.



[edit on 12-3-2009 by Moonsouljah]



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 12:00 PM
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Oh and BTW as long as there's WiFi I can watch mobile all the porn videos I want- in good quality.

Not that I do- I just can. For free.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 12:03 PM
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Originally posted by badkarma90
reply to post by BornPatriot
 


But what if you're like me where you can just steal the wifi from a neighbor? ...much like I'm doing now.




You shouldnt go advertising your illegal activities..especially here on ATS, where that is against T&C.

Unless your neighbor knows your using their wi-fi and has given you permission to do so, your actions are the very reason why no one can trust anyone. THat is the actions of a thief...a petty one at that.




Cheers!!!!



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by RFBurns
 

Maybe it is illegal but why is it wrong if their WiFi RadioWaves are flowing the person's home anyways?
If I were to run rigged microwaves all day in my house would my neighbor be stealing my cancer?
If I threw dog crap in you're yard and you turned it into bio-diesel is that stealing?

Put a password on it or suffer slower bandwidth. And where does it say that it's illegal anyways? Isn't it moral hazard to LEGALLY sell devices capable of tapping into someone else's WiFi? What if your computer recognized the signal and it was a total mistake?
There's a million laws but please tell me who issued that one.
-Interpol? Local goverment? State Gov? National gov? Dare I say---World Government?



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by RFBurns
 

Maybe it's not petty but rather a lesson in sharing. America is Socialist nowadays mind you.
If you or anyone teaches their kids not to steal I hope they turn off the nightly news from Washington.
He's just redistributing the WiFi wealth.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 12:59 PM
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Originally posted by Moonsouljah
reply to post by RFBurns
 

Maybe it's not petty but rather a lesson in sharing. America is Socialist nowadays mind you.
If you or anyone teaches their kids not to steal I hope they turn off the nightly news from Washington.
He's just redistributing the WiFi wealth.



No, you are stealing it. And now you are just trying to make excuses to justify it. If he was sharing it, then he would know about it. And how about you share some of the costs with him?

You are the one who needs a lesson in sharing, not your neighbor.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 01:07 PM
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Having standards is good... having double standards is twice as good.
2nd line



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 01:18 PM
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You guys crack me up... PUBLIC - WIFI is any unsecured Router with Internet access . if it is not locked with a WEP Key you can use it --- FREE of "Charge" if he used a Wep Key hacker and gained access that is Federal crime...



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 01:34 PM
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Originally posted by BornPatriot
You guys crack me up... PUBLIC - WIFI is any unsecured Router with Internet access . if it is not locked with a WEP Key you can use it --- FREE of "Charge" if he used a Wep Key hacker and gained access that is Federal crime...


Yes, many people leave their WIFI open for the public to use. My Iphone connects to peoples wifi's as I drive by if they are open etc.

Mine has a WEP key and I give it to my friends so they can connect and stuff when they are over, but I don't leave it open to the public.

But some people don't know or realize they need to protect their WIFI and in a haste to get it working accidentally leave those things open. And if his neighbor doesn't know he is using it, then he is stealing it. I doubt he'd go to jail or anything but he is actually stealing it.

I think I might giggle a bit if it turns out his neighbor knows and is snooping his connection and watching what sites he goes to and what information he posts/sends out. 2 way street and it's not hard to keep logs.



[edit on 12-3-2009 by badmedia]



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 02:01 PM
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reply to post by badmedia
 

Yo bro- I ain't stealin' nothing. I was simply defending the guy who initially claimed such.
And Kudos BornPatriot-- If it ain't locked it's public.

But seriously, to anyone who says it's stealing: produce a law that states this -as a challenge. I'd like to see it. And if there is no law, then by my logic I would conclude it would either constitute:
A) a legal form of stealing or
B)it is not stealing.
If it is A, then there should be a law enacted and until then don't complain about it because it is legal. Go write your representative or something. I'm sure DC knows all about theft laws.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by Moonsouljah
But seriously, to anyone who says it's stealing: produce a law that states this -as a challenge. I'd like to see it. And if there is no law, then by my logic I would conclude it would either constitute:
A) a legal form of stealing or
B)it is not stealing.
If it is A, then there should be a law enacted and until then don't complain about it because it is legal. Go write your representative or something. I'm sure DC knows all about theft laws.


Actually I think you have it backwards, you have to prove it is theft before a law can be written for it. He is still taking something that isn't his from another person.

Is it "that" big of a deal? No. Is he going to end up in jail? Probably not. But it is still theft.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by Moonsouljah
reply to post by badmedia
 

Yo bro- I ain't stealin' nothing. I was simply defending the guy who initially claimed such.
And Kudos BornPatriot-- If it ain't locked it's public.


So, if I leave my apartment unlocked, all my stuff becomes public and anyone is allowed to take it huh? How bout if there is an unlocked power outlet on the outside of your house? Does that mean it's public and now I can run my house off your power?

To everyone asking to be spoon-fed the law because they are to lazy or stupid to do a Google search, there is indeed a federal law that prohibits using someone elses connection without permission.

Federal law, that means federal prison time. If you are using file sharing software to download free software then you are also guilty of identity fraud as the courts always see that as trying to cover your tracks by using someone elses IP.



[edit on 12-3-2009 by Tiloke]



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 03:59 PM
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Im glad Im smart enough to protect my wifi against theives.

But for those who you who choose to steal:



www.law.com...
Florida Man Charged With Stealing Wi-Fi Signal
The Associated Press
July 8, 2005


Police have arrested a man for using someone else's wireless Internet network in one of the first criminal cases involving this fairly common practice.

Benjamin Smith III, 41, faces a pretrial hearing this month following his April arrest on charges of unauthorized access to a computer network, a third-degree felony.

Police say Smith admitted using the Wi-Fi signal from the home of Richard Dinon, who had noticed Smith sitting in an SUV outside Dinon's house using a laptop computer.

The practice is so new that the Florida Department of Law Enforcement doesn't even keep statistics, according to the St. Petersburg Times, which reported Smith's arrest this week.

Innocuous use of other people's unsecured Wi-Fi networks is common. But experts say that illegal use often goes undetected, such as people sneaking on others' networks to traffic in child pornography, steal credit card information and send death threats.

Security experts say people can prevent such access by turning on encryption or requiring passwords, but few bother or even know how to do so.

Wi-Fi, short for Wireless Fidelity, has enjoyed prolific growth since 2000.

Millions of households have set up wireless home networks that allow people to use the Web from their backyards but also reach the house next door or down the street.

Prosecutors declined to comment, and a working phone number could not be located for Smith.




[edit on 3/12/2009 by greeneyedleo]



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 04:02 PM
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www.time.com...
Confessions of a Wi-Fi Thief
By Lev Grossman Thursday, Jun. 12, 2008

Apparently that violates Title 18, Part 1, Chapter 47 of the United States Code, which covers anybody who "intentionally accesses a computer without authorization or exceeds authorized access."





www.law.cornell.edu...
TITLE 18 > PART I > CHAPTER 47 > § 1030Prev | Next § 1030. Fraud and related activity in connection with computers




Is this clear enough?

[edit on 3/12/2009 by greeneyedleo]



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 04:12 PM
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If something is in my house and it was put in MY house by its owner is it stealing if I use it?

These wifi signals are in my house and I didn't put them there. So I use them. Can't be stealing. The owner but the signal in my house!

Vas



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 04:16 PM
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Originally posted by Vasilis Azoth
If something is in my house and it was put in MY house by its owner is it stealing if I use it?

These wifi signals are in my house and I didn't put them there. So I use them. Can't be stealing. The owner but the signal in my house!

Vas


If you visit my home and leave your wallet there, may I go thru it, take your money and run up your credit cards? After all you left it at MY HOUSE!

Go read the LAW. Not that laws mean anything to thieves



[edit on 3/12/2009 by greeneyedleo]



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 05:48 PM
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It's funny the guy tapping his wifi in a car outside and was dumb enough to get caught. I wonder if he was looking up child porn or something and they traced it backed to him.

Honestly, I'm no lawyer but that us code you provided was written in pretty vague language.
"(1) having knowingly accessed a computer without authorization or exceeding authorized access, and by means of such conduct having obtained information that has been determined by the United States Government pursuant to an Executive order or statute to require protection against unauthorized disclosure for reasons of national defense or foreign relations, or any restricted data, as defined in paragraph y. of section 11 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, with reason to believe that such information so obtained could be used to the injury of the United States, or to the advantage of any foreign nation willfully communicates, delivers, transmits, or causes to be communicated, delivered, or transmitted, or attempts to communicate, deliver, transmit or cause to be communicated, delivered, or transmitted the same to any person not entitled to receive it, or willfully retains the same and fails to deliver it to the officer or employee of the United States entitled to receive it; "

As far as I can tell this is the only applicable statute and doesn't apply unless he had used said Wifi to access to info that, "protection against unauthorized disclosure for reasons of national defense or foreign relations, or any restricted data."
And unless this "Ben Smith III" did access juicy data I don't think his accessing of the Wifi whether knowingly or not would constitute a violation of this law.

I'm really impressed you found that law and I commend you for it but I think you took it out of context and none of the other stipulation meet the situation of the particular case. I did not say he had been found guilty and there wasn't even comment from the prosecution.
So, I still personally don't think this law prohibits what was first mentioned- tapping a neighbor's WiFi.

Good Work Researching Though! (I'll star ya)



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 05:51 PM
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If you visit my home and leave your wallet there, may I go thru it, take your money and run up your credit cards? After all you left it at MY HOUSE!

[edit on 3/12/2009 by greeneyedleo]


As a hypothetical- did you know I visited your house? Because if not and you don't know me as a friend I'd say do whatever you want to it apart from the credit card thing.



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