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Global Meltdown is Over. Now is time to make Money.

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posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 08:30 PM
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The globalists own Citibank so this is more of the same rhetoric that Obama (Trilateralist) has thrown out there that stocks are a great buy right now.

As Mogombo once said, "this investing stuff is easy-buy gold,silver,oil and guns; we're all freaking doomed"




posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 08:42 PM
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Wow gotta love Mogambu.

To the OP I must say, "sold to you". If you believe your post your one of the people PT Barnum talked about being born every minute.

There may be a way to make money by being on the right side of a Bear market rally, just be nimble and take profits when you can.

I may one day be able to say a buy and hold strategy isn't a bad way to invest over the long haul. I'll say that when the solvency (it's never been about liquidity) issue with banks is solved, some real regulation is in place, exotic instuments (CDS, CDOs, MBS) are forced onto regulated exchanges with margin supervision, and our political class figures out ramping spending will not get us out of this. It's going to be a while before I think any type of long term investment is a good idea.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 08:44 PM
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Obama advisers’ Citigroup ties raise questions
Administration taps two former executives for high-level positions

www.msnbc.msn.com...


But their shift to the Obama administration from Citigroup has raised questions about the potential for conflicts of interest, and about whether Mr. Obama’s own staff members benefited from the kinds of Wall Street excesses he has criticized.

“You sort of have to wonder why it is so smart to put them in charge now, if they helped create the mess that we are in,” said Melanie Sloan, executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. “They wouldn’t strike me as the natural choice.”

'Incestuous'
Senator Richard C. Shelby, Republican of Alabama, has questioned whether the Obama administration, like the Bush administration, is relying too much on former bank executives in shaping the bailout of the financial sector. Recent appointees include Mark A. Patterson, a former lobbyist at Goldman Sachs, who is now the chief of staff to the Treasury secretary.

“It seems to be an incestuous financial relationship situation here,” Mr. Shelby said at a Senate hearing last week, referring to senior Treasury executives, like Mr. Patterson, who once worked at investment banks. “And that’s very troubling not only to a lot of people on this committee but to the American people.”


There is something really fricken fishy going on here.

www.nytimes.com...



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 08:53 PM
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we may have a bear market rally that could take us back to S&P 850 but it will only be a bear market rally (this chance would be higher if they re-instate the uptick rule) historically almost all steep declines have very very large bear mkt rallies within them.......but in such an era of manipulation i would not try to trade short term in this market



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Great catch! Star for you


Obama has always been fishy to me since the campaign. I've always seen him as the lesser of two evils, and ever since he's been elected, he has done nothing but prove me right.

Didn't the web bot say something about people getting really mad once they realize they've been duped again?

Those politicians are all the same, why do people view Obama under such a bright light? It sickens me



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 09:05 PM
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reply to post by redhatty
 



"Gentleman, you have come sixty days too late. The depression is over."
- Herbert Hoover, responding to a delegation requesting a public works program to help speed the recovery, June 1930


Thats why it wasn't over. Hoover failed to act. We have acted decisively.

The derivatives were the biggest danger to the system. By not allowing the banks to default(fail), they have removed that danger from the system.

Thats why the market went up yesterday. Because Bernanke made it a point that the big banks WILL NOT FAIL! The mark to market and uptick rule were just sideshows, but will also have a positive effect once they are corrected. This will take care of a bunch of solvency issues and allow repayments to the goverment. AIG is the most effected. Then Citi. Then BAC.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by badkarma90
 


Not the web bots again. Last time I checked, their predictions are not comming true



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 09:30 PM
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I can't comment much on whether or not the crisis is over, or the meltdown stabilizing, but I will say this - now is the time to start researching and looking into investments, especially within the fields of genomics, biotech, and nanotech. The former two, perhaps, more than the latter at the moment. If you can find a good startup company to invest in, do your research, and play the markets right - you stand to make a LOT of money in the next 10~20 years. It'd be like getting in on the ground floor of IBM or Microsoft back when they were first startups.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 09:32 PM
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Originally posted by rattan1
reply to post by badkarma90
 


Not the web bots again. Last time I checked, their predictions are not comming true


The web bots accurately predicted that their predictions will not come true. With that kind of foresight, how can you not trust them?



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 10:11 PM
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I seriously doubt the crisis is over yet - there's still a very long way to go IMO.
It's more likely that Citigroup are dreaming against all hope that people will start to buy their shares & get some confidence back into their business. A bunch of leaky nonsense if you ask me...

The only way out of all this mess is to get the economy moving again, get producing & manufacturing so people can keep their jobs & so businesses don't fail just so long as the people get spending again to buy all the stuff being produced & get the whole system & the flow of money moving again...etc... but in all honesty - that whole process is just not going to happen overnight - it's going to take ages to get that sort of momentum up in the current situation.

Think about it: there's so many businesses on the brink of failure, countless people already losing jobs, interest rates next to nothing on any savings that people might actually have & the rest too scared to borrow & future job security (for those that still have one) is shaky at best, certainly no guarantees.

People just aren't going to start spending in any big way right now, there's still a lot of fear about the economy & what might yet still be to come. (If they lose their job or house....aaaarggg!!! it's scary stuff if you've got a family to feed) & last time I checked most businesses are paralysed with fear & stopping production & shedding employees rather than upping production.

Actually quite serious advice **do not buy shares right now** all that glitters is a maresnest. They just want to tempt you in before the axe falls & squeeze the last buck out of your hands...

Now is not the time to start gambling with stocks & shares, just give it a while longer, at least until the momentum picks up so that things are a bit more stable.

Just go look at the Citigroup shares over the last year, the recent upward turn of a couple of dollars is insignificant compared to where they were at their over-inflated prices, it really is just a wobble rather than a turning point of the end of the crisis.

The overall trend forecast is - well, still far too early to say... but I very much doubt there'll be any bottom-levelling until it's all crashed out & we've expelled all that stale flatulent air out of the bubble... & I reckon that'll be a long way off yet.

[edit on 11/3/2009 by migtsema]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 10:24 PM
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What the H, I just enrolled in my employer's 401K


We might not be at the very bottom yet, but we sure as H are close. So anything I put in now should go way up over the next 10 years or so, until we hit the next recession.

Good time to start investing, IMHO.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 10:38 PM
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The 300+ point rise was NOT due to Citi's "news" (creative writing, I call it). It was short-covering that drove the market yesterday. Believe this is over, and I have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell you. Normally, I'd charge 10 Billion for it, but for you- $9,999,999,999.98 .



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 11:09 PM
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Originally posted by rattan1
The Economic Meltdown is over….. Time to make some money.


Here's a prediction for you. Tomorrow we resume the bear market freefall.



As for CITI, you failed to read the memo or you would of noted that Citi included $44 billion in deferred tax assets to their TCE ratios and no mention of write offs, which means it's was a big load of unquantified horsecrap as Citi is bankrupt and on welfare cheese. The resulting bear market rally had more to do with a very low put-to-call ratio, market maker markups and rumors of mark-to-market rule changes.

As for bottom, the book value on the S&P500 is around the 500pt level, so look there.


[edit on 12-3-2009 by Regenmacher]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 11:12 PM
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Originally posted by disgustedbyhumanity
Thats why it wasn't over. Hoover failed to act. We have acted decisively.

The derivatives were the biggest danger to the system. By not allowing the banks to default(fail), they have removed that danger from the system.

Thats why the market went up yesterday. Because Bernanke made it a point that the big banks WILL NOT FAIL! The mark to market and uptick rule were just sideshows, but will also have a positive effect once they are corrected. This will take care of a bunch of solvency issues and allow repayments to the goverment. AIG is the most effected. Then Citi. Then BAC.
Decisively the opposite what should've been done: Pick an economics team of proven failures and second choices, burn money instead of investing, throw money at failing companies instead of the strong, send money to people who never paid taxes.

What they've done in the last few months is enough to justify a revolution.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 11:55 PM
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Glad this mess is over.

Since it's over and it is time to make money, any stock to suggest ?

GM, Ford, Chrysler, BoA, Citigroup, Microsoft, Google ????

Real estate maybe ?????


Honestly, We all wish it's over.

The freaking problem could be that it is over !!!!

When the money will start running again in the system, because it is over.

The Fed and central banks will have to control or stop inflation. They will sell treasury bonds, but more likely raise interest rates.

So much debt created with bailouts, the states will have tremendous times paying the debt and interest on it.

There will be no other choice than raise taxes or bust if they cannot sustain the burden of debt.

Back on starting box.

Sorry, I don't see an exit of this crisis any time soon, The ups seen on the Dow is probably a dead cat bounce, Or a push from inflationary force, underlying a debasement of currency.

There is some bucks to do in a rally, 3 X ETF are risky, even if FAS made some 38 % tuesday.

The worse case would be to abandon the mark to market. Good business, with good standing will be penalized, being mix-up with corporate tramps, and lame ducks.

As an investor you won't even trust any balance sheet, What will be your referal to buy or sell ? A company is not richer because of a wishfull thinking.

It is going to lead to a bigger crash.

1) What they have to do, IMO, is devaluate the currency in order to sustain these new debts and create equity on hard assets.

2) Declare ''force majeure'' suspend bet such as CDS for those you have not ANY loans or interest to protect, like any insurances contracts, you must have something at stake to contract.

3) Let the bad guys fail.

4)Set new regulations for fiscal evasion.

5)Reinstate closets between banks, insurances and brokers.

6)Nationalize the fed (for US ) as suggested by Dr. Paul.

7) Suspend naked short selling for a while.

8) Being serious with rules inforcement (SEC).

Anyways I'm not Geithner, nor Bernanke. But I don't share your optimism.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 12:03 AM
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Originally posted by skeeveve
What the H, I just enrolled in my employer's 401K


We might not be at the very bottom yet, but we sure as H are close. So anything I put in now should go way up over the next 10 years or so, until we hit the next recession.

Good time to start investing, IMHO.


Pleased to see that you could understand the point I wanted to make. Now is indeed a good time to buy



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 12:26 AM
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reply to post by rattan1
 


It seems like Citigroup is still in trouble, and the revenue number that they released did not account for writedowns, or expenses.

Citigroup and the others bank still need more capital, and if they are thinking of buying out the bondholders, than the stock is probably already worthless. The equity holders will get nothing if this actually happens.

www.bloomberg.com...

[edit on 12-3-2009 by amaranth]

[edit on 12-3-2009 by amaranth]

[edit on 12-3-2009 by amaranth]



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 12:32 AM
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My biggest concern is with the rate of growth in the past 20 years before this crash, which in my opinion is far from over. In 1988 the DOW was at 2000, only 20 years later it was at 12 000 in 2008. That's a lot faster growth then the previous 20 years, in 1968 it was at 900 and grew to 2000 by 1988. In short 1968-1988 saw 122% growth (average of 6.1% a year), 1988-2008 saw 500% growth (average of 25% per year).

How much of those gains will have be returned until we are at realistic levels of growth over the 20 year period? I think the credit bubble was responsible for much of that huge growth and now it has burst much of it will be returned. If growth was at 122% for the last 20 years (the same as the previous 20) the market would have been about 4400 in 2008. That's not to say the past 20 years growth wasn't based on anything real or sustainable but it's worth thinking about.

[edit on 12-3-2009 by Jacob08]



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 12:45 AM
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What's going on? "You never want a serious crisis to go to waste," said chief of staff Rahm Emanuel. "This crisis provides the opportunity for us to do things that you could not do before."


And there you have it.
www.washingtonpost.com...

[edit on 123131p://bThursday2009 by Stormdancer777]



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 01:12 AM
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reply to post by rattan1
 


Citi posted a OPERATIONAL PROFIT. What that means is revenue versus expenses. But it doesn't include taxes, toxic asset write downs, and normal asset declines. It also includes many one time profits.

In other words they still lost a boat load of money and are essentially an insolvent zombie bank..



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