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The Mars South Pole Ring Anomoly

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posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 02:48 AM
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reply to post by theresult
 


Also, result.....we have no knowledge of the underlying strata at the impact point.

To expand on result's analogy....I think the reference was to high-speed camera footage of how water reacts to impacts, as a pebble, for instance, is dropped in.

There are ripples, of course....but also, that center bit....it slaps up a droplet of water, which of course, being water, smooths out very rapidly.

NOW, imagine rock/crust being superheated to a molten state, very suddenly....mimicking the liquid water effect, but solidifying quickly, in the center, leaving a mound.

The impact has also caused an ejecta to arc up and out, and precipitate in a mostly circular pattern.

Drop a marble into sand....of course, the marble won't melt and become part of the crater and ejecta, but the effect is similar....just no superheating and melting of rock.

getting clearer?

And, again.....since it is on an ice cap....and this is purely speculative...it is extremely recent. Since, there has not been time for more ice....whether H2O or CO2 ice, either way, you'd expect that as every Martian 'year' (about equilavent to two Earth years) passed, the ejecta rim would accumulate white stuff.....


EDIT....can anyone calculate the approx, diameter of the ring???


[edit on 3/11/0909 by weedwhacker]




posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 03:02 AM
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yep i would agree with you on this, we dont know what the "ground" was like but im guessing it was lava at the time to produce that effect, and the object that hit it was very dens and came in more or less in strate on, as rf burns pointed out "no splatter" very very smooth and no elongated ness ect..

I have no idea how big it is ill try have a check and update or check the scource.




posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 03:08 AM
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Originally posted by SuperSlovak
Why does it always have to be a rock or a balloon?


Because Phage owns stock in rock and balloon companies even the ones
that "plummet from the sky"



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 03:19 AM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69

Originally posted by SuperSlovak
Why does it always have to be a rock or a balloon?


Because Phage owns stock in rock and balloon companies even the ones
that "plummet from the sky"


ROFLMAO!!!!


Oh God Im busting a gut on that one!!! Saved for future laughs!!



Cheers!!!!

[edit on 11-3-2009 by RFBurns]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 03:34 AM
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www.msss.com...

The large, circular feature in this image is an old meteor impact crater. The crater is larger than the 3 kilometers-wide (1.9 miles-wide) Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, thus only part of the crater is seen. The bright mesas full of pits and holes--in some areas resembling swiss cheese--are composed of frozen carbon dioxide. In this summertime view, the mesa slopes and pit walls are darkened as sunlight causes some of the ice to sublime away. At one time in the past, the crater shown here may have been completely covered with carbon dioxide ice, but, over time, it has been exhumed as the ice sublimes a little bit more each summer. The crater is located near 86.8°S, 111.6°W. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the upper left.

and this picture just is amazing


mars3d.com...

and you thought that object looked wack, check some of the stuff in that picture!!


woops forgot to say hope that helps with the "size" of the thing!!


[edit on 11-3-2009 by theresult]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 04:28 AM
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It is an impact crater, likely not very recent:
www.msss.com...


[edit on 11/3/2009 by internos]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 04:32 AM
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reply to post by internos
 


ohh nice piccy


would you agree with my assesment interno then? just bog standard creator ect..?

Looks odd but thats the cool thing about planets!! hehe

I still freak out at the size of cydonia "that mother is HUGE"



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 04:40 AM
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reply to post by theresult
 


Absolutely, yes: besides, the image that you've posted clarifies its appearance: it's a complex-not so complex crater
What is always hard to understand is the central peak, which formation is not always easy neither to explain nor to understand. This is a crater relatively old, but definately nice looking.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 04:58 AM
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reply to post by internos
 


hey thanks interno


woops 2nd line


[edit on 11-3-2009 by theresult]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 05:32 AM
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I'm thinking this picture is exactly what came into my head when i read Arthur C Clarke's 2001: a space odyssey's description of the worm hole the spaceman finds when he visits one of the moons of Saturn.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 10:42 AM
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Phage, thank you.

I took a look at the image and immediately thought "isn't that what impact craters are supposed to look like?" Then saw your post, and busted a gut laughing. Funniest thing I have read all day.

Sorry OP but it most likely is what it looks like. Luckily most things are, otherwise life would be very confusing.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 11:54 AM
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My only problem with the theory it is a strike is that you can see the central peak as well as the impact melt. But the super hot ejecta is not present. There would be melted ice where the ejecta was thrown, instead there is just normal undisturbed ice. You should see the remains of a quasi pyroclastic cloud effect that is not present.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:07 PM
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Lol @ the arguments. Don't be so sure of yourselves, it could be anything. But I must say, it looks like no crater I've ever seen.

And is it just me, or is the terrain up until the first inner ring color change, look extremely flat to you? Craters don't hit and leave a somewhat leveled surface do they?

[edit on 11-3-2009 by -NewSense-]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 02:32 PM
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As a followup to my previous post.

The central peak also is not an indication of a meteor strike in the sense that if you look at most complex craters just after their creation the central peak is smoothed out. This central peak has anomalies that are not characteristic.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 02:42 PM
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its on a planet no human has been before
so we will never know 100% what it really is



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 02:46 PM
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Sure, but it's still fun to debate about.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 02:52 PM
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reply to post by DaMod
 


Several arguments indicate that a preferential production mechanism, e.g., pingo formation made possible by subsurface permafrost confined to Martian polar regions, may account for the central peak excess in the south polar region.
Source


The craters near the south pole are different and it may be because of a layer of permafrost.

A pingo, also called a hydrolaccolith, is a mound of earth-covered ice found in the Arctic and subarctic that can reach up to 70 metres (230 ft) in height and up to 600 m (2,000 ft) in diameter.

en.wikipedia.org...

The melted permafrost could also reform with a smoother, more regular surface than normal regolith.

[edit on 3/11/2009 by Phage]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 03:05 PM
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Ah, thanks Phage enlightening as always.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 09:51 PM
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That is a very interesting feature. It looks to me like there is molten rock or glass in the interior of the ring. There also appears to be a large central mound. The polar ice surrounds the ring but does not appear to cover the interior surface. There are what looks like ripples inside the ring but these features do not seem to extend beyond the main body of the ring.

There are a couple of things that I can think of that could cause these features.

A very large Boloid meteor, which exploded above the surface. These types of meteors don't leave impact craters per se, they do release a lot of heat. This could account for the shape and the appearance of molten rock or glass.

The feature could be volcanic in origin. The parts that look like molten rock could be exactly that, and the dark area could be ejecta from the central cone. The ripples could be due to uneven distribution of the ejecta. The lack of ice coverage could be due to differences in temperature,
elevation, texture, or a combination of these factors.

Another cause could be a local hotspot of geothermal heat. I noticed that the area that looked like molten rock exists outside the ring. This could be a much older feature and may not necessarily be related to the ring itself. In this case the hotspot would keep the area clear of ice, and the surface features outside of the ring would be obscured by ice. This would cause the interior of the ring to look out of place, but if we saw the whole area free of ice, then the ring would not be visible at all.

Anyway, these are some possiblitlies that are an alternative to the impact crater theory.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 10:02 PM
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reply to post by theresult
 


That is a very interesting picture. Any idea what the straight line features are? They remind me of the Nazca lines. I originally thought that they were imaging artifacts but when I looked closer they do seem to be on the surface of Mars.




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