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The Mars South Pole Ring Anomoly

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posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:19 AM
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What forces could result in such an isolated feature so different from its surrounding area? How did it get there? Why is is there? What is its purpose? These are questions that must be answered to find the truth in mars anomolies like this one.

Here, we have a ring. Just sitting there by itself. No other rings in the area. Just one ring. Completely different from the rest of the landscape.

I will let you be the judge, natural or artificial?


Original NASA image (no image tampering!)

Original NASA image


Link
I dont know why but it wont let me post the picture itself.
Id like to thank j.p. skipper for the awesome work he is doing!


[edit on 11-3-2009 by SuperSlovak]




posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:24 AM
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Wow that's pretty neat. It reminds me of a speaker, especially the last photo. Weird that the ring has no snow on it like it's been freshly tilled.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:29 AM
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reply to post by SuperSlovak
 


Very good find SuperSlovak !

will be interesting to find out what this is

star and flag


[edit on 11-3-2009 by easynow]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:33 AM
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Looks like a recent strike by a meteorite.......

My 2 cents.

-Kdial1



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:35 AM
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Originally posted by SuperSlovak
What forces could result in such an isolated feature so different from its surrounding area?

The force of a large rock, plummeting from the sky.



How did it get there?

A large rock plummeted from the sky.



Why is is there?

Because a large rock plummeted from the sky.



What is its purpose? These are questions that must be answered to find the truth in mars anomolies like this one.

To give Skipper something to do?



[edit on 3/11/2009 by Phage]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:36 AM
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It keeps getting stranger when you zoom in the center.
Looks like some sort of object in the middle.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:38 AM
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Why does it always have to be a rock or a balloon?



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:39 AM
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reply to post by SuperSlovak
 


I don't think balloons make craters.
It's a crater. Like thousands, all over Mars.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:45 AM
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I hear balloon and just a rock come up alot to explain away ufos

But this ring is perfectly round most creators are oval shaped
This one looks a little different



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:47 AM
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even if it's a perfectly round rock...lol

what's up with the black circle ?



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:56 AM
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Creators go below ground because of the impact, this ring has comes to a peak in the middle, or there is something in the middle.
That's what I was trying to say.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 01:04 AM
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reply to post by SuperSlovak
 


Impact craters sometimes form with a central peak.
www.marstoday.com...

The south polar reason seems to have a high percentage of such craters.

Mariner 9 imagery shows that central peaked craters occur much more frequently in the Martian south polar region than in typical equatorial areas, and that both regions have crater size frequency distributions characteristics of saturation. Several arguments indicate that a preferential production mechanism, e.g., pingo formation made possible by subsurface permafrost confined to Martian polar regions, may account for the central peak excess in the south polar region.

Sourc



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 01:05 AM
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what phage said..

Creators go below ground because of the impact, this ring has comes to a peak in the middle, or there is something in the middle.
That's what I was trying to say.


think of a water droplet hittingng "water" what happens?

this time we are dealing with rock not "that has solidified"

easy really,,,

nothing more than a impact from "something"

very normal unless the object was infact sqaure! "just to be a pain"




posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 01:07 AM
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reply to post by SuperSlovak
 


Super.....

Looks a lot, to me, like a fairly recent meteor impact.

Most craters are, in fact, mostly round.

Again, it looks very much as if the ejecta from the impact (that would be a lot of the sub-surface soil) was thown up, arced out, and re-settled into the ring you see now.

Lack of any erosion, no snow.....it would seem to be quite recent!

I believe, under certain scenarios, the rebounding of the shockwaves can cause some soil, and/or crust, to "heap" near the center.

Look up 'Meteor Crater' in Arizona, USA. Of course, that crater is estimated to have been formed about 50,000 years ago....and has undergone a lot of erosion.....the similarities are striking (no pun intended)

EDIT D'Oh! Phage and result beat me to it!!!

result, like the analogy to a water drop!!! Of course, some of the rock would become molten....wish I'd thought of it.....

[edit on 3/11/0909 by weedwhacker]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 01:10 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 01:20 AM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


I try to keep it simple


btw the arizona impact was "dug" into as people thought it something "that hit it" had something special "deep down there".. most impacts "depending on the "heat" ie water drolet anolagy" would infact produce the same "bump" due to the heat "motelten rock" ect

physicis 101

; )

or feel free to visit any site that deals with impacts of metors " same thing happens when a rain drop hits water" only this time we use rock and heat to get the same effect.

thanks for the
hehe



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 02:18 AM
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Originally posted by Phage

Originally posted by SuperSlovak
What forces could result in such an isolated feature so different from its surrounding area?

The force of a large rock, plummeting from the sky.



How did it get there?

A large rock plummeted from the sky.



Why is is there?

Because a large rock plummeted from the sky.



You sure that rock has'nt plummeted from the sky onto your head?

Ok its understandable that meteors hit Mars, but that ring has no similarities to impact craters in other areas of Mars.

The center circle does look like an impact crater.

But that huge outer ring...Im not so sure that was caused by your plummeting rock from the sky. The ring looks too even with the rest of the surface, outside of it and inside up to the center indention.

Good find!


Cheers!!!!



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 02:31 AM
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Hi burns

please see my post above.

A water droplet hitting a pool of water will have the very same effect depending on "factors" of "what" hit the surface..

It may look "odd" when infact its not. I am not saying things in space or on other planets can be tossed away, But in this case its very clear its just an impact creater.

nothing more to add really.

It even has a "ripple" effect.

You see when something HOT hits something "depending on its density" would also make the "target" or "impact" hot(er) and would produce "liquified" rock " fluid dynamics" rock is very much like water, only it does not have the same energy that water has "getting all physicys" ect..

what im trying to say is the electrons need to be stimulated to produce heat that water natural "lacks" that makes it a fluid, rock has a stronger bond in that respect, the only way to get rock to be liquified is for heat to be "injected" into it "smashing a comet into a planet for instance" would produce this energy "hence" making the rock act like " a water droplet"

hope that helps sorry if i went on abit i was trying to explain why it has such an odd shape.




posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 02:39 AM
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reply to post by theresult
 


Yep I read your post. Its a good theory. Given the layer of permafrost there and possible liquid water underneath, it might cause such an effect.

The "ripples" seem to be consistant all around the circumference of the ring. But here is the deal..where is the "splatter" reminants?

There should be some kind of evidence of splattered ice chunks or runs of water that froze up around the outer area of the ring, if the analogy of a drop onto water is to be applied. I just see the outer edge of the ring where it abruptly ends and then completely different surface feature like that of several miles distant and all around that ring.

Cheers!!!!



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 02:47 AM
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hey nps burns


it could do with alot of factors, here is just one i tired to point out..

comets are not all made from the same "stuff" if one thinks of how vast the cosmos is, it may "may" just be a very very dens object wacking into a spot on mars that would produce this effect, and in all honest would be a once in a life time effect that we would witness.. alot of comets hit earth "tho granted" not mega huge ones but in our past we have had many that have made very oddball shapes...

If you look at the one in arizona "classic" imapact, then you take a look at some of the oddball shapes on the moon and other planets, this is just as rare.

I think the important thing was "the place it hit" and what infact the comet was made from, im guessing "based on my physicis over many years" this thing wacked into mars at a time when "the land was softer" layers of sand "see nasa comet impact pages / vids" using pelets on glass / sand compounds" and the object being very dens in order for the "splatter" to not had been "lets say" not a comment typicaly made from ice but of iron or something with more of a force "strate on impact . trajectory ect.

its like as soon as that thing hit, the mantal froze, almost like it hit lava

you kinda see what im saying?



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