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Ignited Pluto?

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posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 06:26 PM
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This maybe in the wrong forum and it maybe completely stupid.

But is Pluto supposed to be on fire?

I thought it was blue?




posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 06:58 PM
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reply to post by OutofLives
 


The link only contained the picture, but I suspect that that is an infrared image.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 07:28 PM
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Interesting, the infrared image means that heat is coming from within Pluto?

Perhaps Pluto is not cold and lifeless, but a whole living world exists beneath its cold exterior.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 07:46 PM
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No. No. No. Pluto like any planet, reflects light. The image is probably in the infared spectrum and overexposed. Someone else will explain it better.


[edit on 10/3/09 by YourForever]



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 07:54 PM
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I don't think there is much of an atmosphere on pluto so I don't see how anything could actually ignite on it



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 08:09 PM
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I read a report that Pluto is said to be much warmer than they origonally thought, I think I read it on Space.com, so something has changed.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 08:16 PM
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It is impossible for Pluto to ignite.

It is a rocky planet with barely any atmosphere so fire could not exist on it.

If you are talking about ignition like a star, then that too is impossible, because pluto is rock, not gas, and has no where near enough mass for that to occur



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 08:34 PM
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Pluto did not ignite.
The image was made in 1994 with the Hubble Space Telescope with the Faint Object Camera. It it not a true color image and you can read all about how it was made here

Here is the image that is used in Google sky (which is not a real time image, btw):
apod.nasa.gov...

[edit on 3/10/2009 by Phage]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 02:49 AM
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According to the date on Google Earth it was taken at 0:00 AM on the 10th March 2009.

Plus all the other planets/major stars have realistic images not thermal or infrared etc.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 01:14 AM
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Originally posted by OutofLives
Plus all the other planets/major stars have realistic images not thermal or infrared etc.


That's because we have good pictures of the seven other planets due to probes being sent to them.

Pluto has never been visited by a deep space probe so this is about the best we have:

www.nasa.gov...

The New Horizons probe is speeding to a 2015 rendezvous with Pluto.

[edit on 2009/3/12 by IAttackPeople]



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by IAttackPeople
 


Yes, and I really hope it takes close-up pictures of Uranus and Neptune as well. We don't have any high quality pictures of those planets either. The best ones we have were from Voyager and you know how long ago that was.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 05:21 PM
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Pluto is little more than a ball of rock and ice, just like the hunderds(?) of other keiper belt objects.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 07:02 PM
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I don't think Pluto will ignite but I guess it shows how photos can be so deceptive. According to Sheldan Nidle, Pluto is an excaped moon of Neptune. Uranus was knocked on it's side by Reptilians during the war. The destruction of Maldek (Asteroid Belt), Mars' atmosphere and oceans, and Venus' atmosphere was all because of warfare. Earth originally had 2 smaller moons, which were destroyed. Vulcan a tiny world inside the orbit of Mercury was destroyed in the 1980s according to him. Our present moon is supposed to be a hollow titanium ball covered in asteroid belt debris. The craters are not just from meteor strikes. Many are from weapons fire and bombs. Can't prove any of it, but it makes fascinating reading.



posted on Mar, 13 2009 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by OutofLives
According to the date on Google Earth it was taken at 0:00 AM on the 10th March 2009.


No -- that date stamp is not the time the picture was taken. That is the time and date that Pluto was in THAT position in the sky shown on Google Sky when YOU were viewing it (which was probably March 10, or a few hours into March 11).

Here is the information I got when I viewed it today (March 13)

"This is the location of Pluto on March 13, 2009, 0:00 AM UTC. Sunlight reflected from the surface of Pluto at this date and time takes 4.4 hours to reach Earth."


Planets move differently relative to the background stars. Obviously they don't take a new picture of the planets every day to show them in their new positions against the background stars. Google Sky simply moves the "old" image of the planet to the place it is supposed to be.


Plus all the other planets/major stars have realistic images not thermal or infrared etc.

As others said, that's only because we have taken close-up pictures of the other planets via space probe. That picture of Pluto is the best we have.


[edit on 3/13/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Apr, 6 2009 @ 03:54 PM
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Really? Do you really know if Pluto has any kind of Atmosphere? There are my things that Humans don't know about the universe, and they clam they know what they are talking about. The sad thing is that they can't leave their little blue planet. So who do they know what they see is not the truth or a lie.



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 07:28 AM
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Originally posted by dogg85
Really? Do you really know if Pluto has any kind of Atmosphere? There are my things that Humans don't know about the universe, and they clam they know what they are talking about. The sad thing is that they can't leave their little blue planet. So who do they know what they see is not the truth or a lie.


Not this BS again we have ways of detecting whats in the atmosphere of planets etc just google it!




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