It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Myth: Alexandria library contained unknown secrets

page: 2
3
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 02:04 AM
link   
I might be wrong here, but didn't Alexander bring all the information he gained form conquering the known world to Alexandria? I always thought that was the beginning of the library. Seems like he would have gained some interesting things

If it was as mundane as you claim why did Christians think it was such a terrible thing that deserved to be destroyed. I know Christians have never needed a good reason to do something stupid but still.\

Edit: Didn't make sense before

[edit on 11-3-2009 by DJones]




posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 06:07 AM
link   
Well, unless Julius Cæsar was a Christian (which he was not) -- Christianity walks free here, for Alexandria was apparently destroyed by accident by the hands of good ol' Julius way before Jesus or any Christian ever walked the Earth. Where do some of you get the idea that the Church somehow managed to predate themselves, pose as Julius Cæsar half a century BC, and accidentally put fire to the library during some kind of show? Beats me. Isn't history interresting enough for you guys? So you have to fabricate events that simply couldn't have happened.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 06:23 AM
link   
The supposed date of Julius Caesar's destruction of the Great Library is in 48 BC.

But,

Strabo, the famed Greek historian, geographer and philosopher, had been to the library, worked in there and even referenced books from the Library in his magnum Opus "Geographica"!

This was almost 25 years later in 25 BC!

There was ofcourse a fire that destroyed parts of the Library but not wholly.

The real destruction could have happened during later stages,

perhaps during the attack of Aurelian
or during the reign of Theodosius I, who had ordered all pagan books to be burned, which the Patriarch Theophilus of Alexandria had gladly carried out.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 08:52 AM
link   
Well strabo was sixty years old when Jesju was born, and could very well have seen the library in the time of Julius Cæsar who died when he was over twenty, and who apparently destroyed the Alexandrian Library about half a decade prior to his death when Strabo was about 18 years old. Your timeframe doesn't match my sources...



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 03:30 PM
link   
reply to post by Neo Christian Mystic
 


It seems to me that the Alexandria Library was like the Library of Congress in its day. There were many copies of great works in the time, although the originals may still be around somewhere. There are vast cave systems that were used to store scrolls and other written works just in case the villages or towns were raided. It is possible that copies of what was housed in Alexandria could still be hidden somewhere.

It is a shame that the library was destroyed, since all we can now really do is just speculate at what was really housed there.

It could of either held the secrets of the universe, or the Jacqueline Susann of the day.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 03:51 PM
link   
There is overwhelming evidence in the historical record that libraries as well as other cultural instutions were commonly destroyed by invaders to isolate the conquered culture from its heritage, thereby, after the 'extinction of living memory,' that is to say after about three human generations, the 'revisionists' can step in to do their remarkably effective work in creating a 'history' more 'compatible' with the 'new managements' policies and objectives ...

One need look no further that the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1959, with the subsequent destruction of over 6000 monestaries, all containing irreplaceable collections of priceless texts, to see that this 'tried and true' method of conquest and 'cultural eradication' is still 'alive and well.'

Any claim that the holdings of Library at Alexandria were insignificant to an understanding of Humanity's collective heritage is shockingly naive and entirely misinformed.

Hope this helps.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 04:25 PM
link   

Originally posted by NatureBoy
reply to post by Neo Christian Mystic
 

... did you read my post?

It was the most complete library in the world containing copies of most of the important works, those same works were ALL destroyed by other catholics over the next thousand years or so and hence huge chunks of text were lost,

The library suffered through several fires. There was never a point where great works were stored at Alexandria and NOWHERE else.

Fact is, other libraries were also destroyed at other times, or fell into disuse, etc.

You should research this matter further. You'll see that no one really knows what happened to the Library.

The "Catholics" didn't destroy the thing. At least, not all of it.

Harte



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 07:03 PM
link   

Originally posted by visible_villain
There is overwhelming evidence in the historical record that libraries as well as other cultural instutions were commonly destroyed by invaders to isolate the conquered culture from its heritage, thereby, after the 'extinction of living memory,' that is to say after about three human generations, the 'revisionists' can step in to do their remarkably effective work in creating a 'history' more 'compatible' with the 'new managements' policies and objectives ...


That's why many ancient cultures were experts at memorising texts. One example is the Hebrews who after Babylon rewrote the Tannakh from memory. Still today, devoted Jewish and Muslim youngsters memorise their holy scriptures letter by letter.


One need look no further that the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1959, with the subsequent destruction of over 6000 monestaries, all containing irreplaceable collections of priceless texts, to see that this 'tried and true' method of conquest and 'cultural eradication' is still 'alive and well.'


Yes and it's a tragedy every time stuff like this happens. Personally I believe more divine and universal knowledge and secrets were lost in Tibet in the fifties and sixties by the hands of Chinese cultural rape of Tibet. But thankfully, the monks also here start memorising texts from very young age, just in case stuff like that should happen, but still, much of what has been written and collected will never again be seen or read. BTW I am currently reading the Tibetan Book of the Dead, in it's first ever complete translation into English, published by Penguin Books. I highly recomend it. His Holiness the Dalai Lama has been consultant and written the foreword.


Any claim that the holdings of Library at Alexandria were insignificant to an understanding of Humanity's collective heritage is shockingly naive and entirely misinformed.

Hope this helps.


Like any library, the Alexandrian one were naturally not insignificant, but like I said, books were scarse back then, and you wouldn't find many of them in ships, and like I said, the vast majority of the stuff kept there were copied from whatever was kept onboard merchantships docking in Egyptian harbors. That was how the library came into being in the first place, to house copies of whatever ships docking in Egypt brought with them. And that was also why it became so big, atleast in the measure of the age.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 02:59 AM
link   
There was a another library, holding copies of the originals of the manuscripts held in the original library.

The Daughter Library!


It must be noted, however, that the Royal Alexandrian Library, or the Museum as it was called for including the original versions of the world’s most renowned books, was not the only library located in the city. There were at least two other libraries in Alexandria: the library of the Serapeum Temple and the library of the Cesarion Temple. The continuity of the literal and scientific life in Alexandria after the destruction of the Royal Library, as well as the flourishing of the city as the world’s center for sciences and literature between the first and the sixth centuries AD, depended to a large extent on the presence of these two libraries and the books and references they contained. Thus, while it is historically recorded that the Royal Library was a private one for the royal family as well as for scientists and researchers, the libraries of the Serapeum and Cesarion temples were public libraries accessible to the people.[17]

Furthermore, while the Royal Library was founded by Ptolemy II Philadelphus in the royal quarters of Bruchion near the palaces and the royal gardens, it was his son Ptolemy III who founded the Serapeum temple and its adjoined library in the popular quarters of Rhakotis. Later, the Serapeum library became known as the Daughter Library, because it contained copies of the original versions found in the Royal Library.

en.wikipedia.org...

So, maybe the original manuscripts /books could have got destroyed during caesar's fire, but the knowledge survived in the copies at the Daughter Library!



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 07:24 AM
link   

Originally posted by DJones
I might be wrong here, but didn't Alexander bring all the information he gained form conquering the known world to Alexandria? I always thought that was the beginning of the library. Seems like he would have gained some interesting things

Unlikely.

It's thought that the Library was founded in the early part of the third century BC. Under Ptolemy I or Ptolemy II.

Alexander died in the fourth century BC (323 BC.)

Harte



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 07:49 AM
link   

Originally posted by Neo Christian Mystic

Originally posted by NatureBoy
well yeah we know that it was a repository for other peoples work, thats sorta how library's are supposed to work, it would be a university if it researched it's own stuff.

When all the works of the Greek's, Roman's, Egyptians. Babylonians, etc were collected together for a brief time it was the most complete library in the world -


Well the point is that you wouldn't find much classic works in Alexandria. Like I said, most of it's contents varied from maps to loggs. Not much interresting in other words. Besides, why would anyone sail out with unique knowledge onboard? I would guess they would make sure to use copies and copies of copies, knowing the dangers of sailing. Like I said, there was not much mystical about this library in the antique world, and perhaps even less today....


wat evidence do you have that alexandria didnt have unique knowledge?



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 10:12 AM
link   

Originally posted by Neo Christian Mystic
It's the same as with the hanging gardens of Babylon, the Kolossos of Rhodos, the endavours of Archimedes and so on.


I am not sure why you bring the Colosus of Rhodes into this.
There has been many pieces of the actual Bronze statue found on the island and in the sea around the horbor. They have even found parts of the plinth that it stood on.

As for the Library, it has always been listed as a repository for knowledge and liturature. The fact that we do not have a complete and accurate listing of what was kept there means we will never be able to prove claims either way.

But to call it nothing more than a store house for maps and logs is very narrow.

But lets say that it is nothing more than that, what is to say that those maps (many made by a ships navigator during the voyage as anotations to existing charts) do not show civilizations that are no longer in existance?

Take the Mediterranean as a whole, we know of at least two volcanic islands that exploded during the time of the Minoans one even was responsible for the destruction of Minoa.

Eruption of Thera volcano

The tidalwaves from the blast flooded the costal cities of Minoa and led to their eventual extinction. What historical, geosocial, and geographical information is now lost due to the libraries distruction?

And that is if it is just maps and logs.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 10:29 AM
link   
Let no forget that the Library also contained no only ships logs but also what they voyagers found within faraway lands.

Like the OP calls nothing of interest that could be found he has not prove of this been the truth.

This logs were part of historical accounts of what the people saw experience and witness during their trips.

Is human nature to want to preserve into history anything that they see as important to them.

So saying that it would have been boring is very far away from the truth.

Unless the OP believe that this seaman had not imagination at all.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 11:21 AM
link   
Here are some rather nice links to discussions of the Library at Alexandria. Not only was it a repository of knowlege without equal in the Ancient World, but a school and research institute, in its own way, certainly the equal of the foremost institutes of its kind in our world today.

Here they are:
Wikipedia
Library
Of
Alexandria
Best Link

This'll get anyone who cares to research the Library started.

The destruction of the Library at Alexandria was a crime of collosal proportions.

[edit on 3/12/2009 by seagull]



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 12:21 PM
link   

Originally posted by Achorwrath
I am not sure why you bring the Colosus of Rhodes into this.
There has been many pieces of the actual Bronze statue found on the island and in the sea around the horbor. They have even found parts of the plinth that it stood on.


There has been found a great deal of splinters from the cross of Jesus too up through the ages. If you gathered them all, you could build a small village. They have no idea where it was located allthough there are many good theories, they don't know what it looked like, and nothing has been found of it, I would like of you to tell me where these mysterious pieces are so I can see them with my own eyes. The accounts say it fell on land and destroyed houses, so why would they find pieces of it in the water? Beats me.



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 12:56 PM
link   

So why do people seem to blow to Alexandria's fires by claiming it was greater than it was? As far as I know indexes of what was gathered there have survived to this day, but since it's a straight forward boring read, people cling to myths with gazoline uppon it's fires, trying to bring some kind of mystery into a totally uninterresting subject. Beats me....


These straight-forward, boring reads could rewrite history. What if there are mundane logs of shipments from the ancient Americas to Egypt (i.e. for mummification supplies, gold, etc.?). What if there are government lists legitimizing societies like Atlantis, etc.?

Sure, they were copied from other documents, but those documents may not have survived in any other form other than those in the Alexandria library, and THAT is the big hope for anyone seriously interested in finding the lost library. Not that the library contains rare tomes that only it had, but that it contains tomes that may not have survived elsewhere...



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 08:28 PM
link   
The Ptolemys were notorious for the lengths they would go to acquire knowledge from around the civilised world. As this extract from Carl Sagans - Cosmos illustrates .




Ptolemy III Euergetes wished to borrow from Athens the original manuscripts or official state copies of the great ancient tragedies of Sophocles, Aeschylus and Euripides






Only after Ptolemy guaranteed their return with an enormous cash deposit did they agree to lend the plays. But Ptolemy valued those scrolls more than gold or silver. He forfeited the deposit gladly and enshrined, as well he might, the originals in the Library





The outraged Athenians had to content themselves with the copies that Ptolemy, only a little shamefacedly, presented to them. Rarely has a state so avidly supported the pursuit of knowledge

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

And as to the fate of some of the libraries contents ..... heres one account taken from The Vanished Library by Luciano Canfora



The books were distributed to the public baths of Alexandria, where they were used to feed the stoves which kept the baths so comfortably warm.

Ibn al-Kifti writes that 'the number of baths was well known, but I have forgotten it' (we have Eutychius's word that there were in fact four thousand).

'They say,' continues Ibn al-Kifti, 'that it took six months to burn all that mass of material.'

==============================================


[edit on 23-3-2009 by UmbraSumus]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 08:47 PM
link   
The mind boggles as to what priceless artefacts have been discarded / damaged in the early years of amateur archaeology.

Workmen dumped "lumps of coal" into the sea whilst crudely excavating Caesars father in laws Villa at Herculaneum, Italy.
Only to later realise they were carbonized manuscripts .

Thankfully 1,800 rolls of carbonized papyrus scroll survived long enough for us to develop the technology to read them .
BYU Adapts Space-age Technology to Study Ancient Documents



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 02:14 AM
link   

Aristotle's teleological concepts had various effects. No matter what subject or science he embarked on he tried to trace the growth of knowledge in the respective field from as far back in the past as possible. He did so critically, rejecting some ideas, agreeing with others. Although his essential purpose was to show that his own theory on the subject was the last step, the telos of a development towards which his predecessors had been groping, 2 Aristotle's search for his antecedents produced several important consequences for the ever-growing role of literacy in the advance of civilization. His research into the past caused Aristotle to collect all available information and literature in his fields of interest-- and there seem to have been none that failed to interest him-- and thus to collect a comprehensive library which established the pattern for the foundation of the Library of Alexandria by the Ptolemies. The operation of a library requires the critical examination and, if possible, the restoration of original texts and their preservation for future generations. The library became a cornerstone of literate civilization; it inspired liberal education and systematic scholarship. Literary scholarship sparked the humanistic ideal of the perpetuation of all knowledge and ideas in literary form, with each generation adding to what it has received.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.




Aristotle's treatises reinforced the trend towards written publication of scientific findings. From Aristotle on, the book and the library became the undisputed means for the preservation and accumulation of knowledge. He was the first to advocate public education in literacy administered by city governments, an idea that soon was to be put into practice by many of the Hellenistic poleis of the Near East. Plato's Academy and Aristotle's Lyceum were the first establishments of higher learning and models for the first insti-s tutions for scientific research and scholarship sponsored and supported by the rulers of states, such as the Museum attached to the Library of Alexandria.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



From the beginning Ptolemy I, Alexander's lieutenant, vigorously supported the promotion of Greek civilization in an alien environment. He had been a friend of Alexander from early youth and may have been under the influence of Alexander's tutor Aristotle. He later invited to his court Demetrius of Phaleron, who as governor of Athens had helped Aristotle to establish the Lyceum and had been one of his pupils there. The Ptolemies founded the Library of Alexandria with its attached Museum as a sanctuary of the Muses and of the arts and sciences they stand for. It was without a doubt inspired by Aristotle's Lyceum, and was the first government-sponsored institution of higher learning and research. The Ptolemies invited to the Museum the outstanding Greek poets and scholars of their time and provided them with the means to pursue their studies. In return the guests at the Museum functioned as librarians and educators of the royal children. The library, which eventually contained all known Greek literature, became the heart and soul of classical scholarship, of Hellenistic poetry and science. The new Greek capital Alexandria grew to be not only the most prosperous commercial city but also the intellectual center of the Hellenistic world.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



Demetrius of Phaleron suggested to Ptolemy II to add the Jewish scriptures to the collection of the Library of Alexandria. Ptolemy dispatched Aristeas with a letter to Jerusalem requesting the high priest to send 72 Jewish scholars, six from each of the twelve tribes, to perform the translation. It was also the beginning of a voluminous Jewish-Alexandrian literature in Greek. The Greek translation added a new dimension to Jewish thought and influenced the evolution of the religion.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



The Power of the Written Word: The Role of Literacy in the History of Western Civilization. Contributors: Alfred Burns - author.


EDIT: Sorry. These are not news sources. They are only parts of the text mentioned above but I don't know how to post them as such.


[edit on 3/24/2009 by haika]



posted on Mar, 24 2009 @ 06:37 PM
link   

Originally posted by UmbraSumus
The Ptolemys were notorious for the lengths they would go to acquire knowledge from around the civilised world. As this extract from Carl Sagans - Cosmos illustrates .


These scrolls and papyri weren't kept in Alexandria, they were kept by the royal libraries. Whichs' books or their contained knowledge are today helt by the elite, people you'd probably call Illuminati or Zionists or elitists today. Knowledge is never lost. The level of knowledge among the common man is controlled by the people who carry it from the generation prior to themselves, in a line of princes since God came her and left the first ones. We now live in the end of the mechanic age -- everything from bow and arrow, to the steem engine to the atomic bomb are mechanical devises. We are now quantum leaping into the age of forces and new substance, call it the world of the science and concern of the philosophers' stones building up a quantum reality where everything is defined mechanised and constructed, and flaws in the scientific mind like scepticism and denial, atheism and religion -- law, will sease to exist the way we know it. And so on. Alexandria was a warehouse or starage for an incredibly vast collection of laws, inventory lists, maps, loggs etc. whatever ships docking in the ports of Egypt during a couple of hundred years BC. It was big OK, but that only shows the true face of the Greco-Egyptian byrocracy and their attemts to control all ship traffic in the Med. and the Red.

And, appart from this ... The biblioteque was bulit partly because Egypt had stopped it's export of papyrus to Greece and Asia (Minor) and most of the ME which led to the invention of parchment in the Asian town Pergamon, and several attemts elsewhere to produce liable and lasting writing media, anyway, to do off with all the extra papyrus Egypt produced, most of it ended up in vaults like the Alexandria library in a gigantic national-economical effort to build up power and wealth, knowledge and intelligence -- control.



new topics

top topics



 
3
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join