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Myth: Alexandria library contained unknown secrets

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posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 12:06 PM
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This post comes in response to a great number of threads discussing what's hidden in the Vatican and does the secret libraries of the Beasty Catholic Church contain secrets captured from Alexandria etc. etc.

Well, the myth goes that there were great secrets within the Alexandrian Library. Well, you all seem to forget one cruxial thing: Everything within the walls of the Library was copied from other sources. Everything. You see, when the library was founded during third century BC by the Ptolemy's, it was part of their taxation strategy, or more precisely a "toll road". Everyone who wanted to reach beyond Egypt to the Red Sea, or the other way around to the Medeterranian ie. ships docking in Egypt, with people wanting to pass through, well, they had to hand over everything written onboard for copying by Alexandrian scholars and writers. Maps, logs, litterature, diaries and so on, and everything was gathered in the Library of Alexandria. The books and scrolls kept inside the library would probably be more interresting for skippers and captains instead of you people searching for secrets and supposed lost ones, like Atlantis etc. Most of what was contained was actually logg books from merchant ships and maps. So why do people seem to blow to Alexandria's fires by claiming it was greater than it was? As far as I know indexes of what was gathered there have survived to this day, but since it's a straight forward boring read, people cling to myths with gazoline uppon it's fires, trying to bring some kind of mystery into a totally uninterresting subject. Beats me....

[edit on 10/3/2009 by Neo Christian Mystic]




posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 01:07 PM
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I am intrigued by the library of Alexandria because of the vast amount of ancient knowledge that was apparently kept there. Almost like rebuilding the Tower of Babylon if you believe that sort of thing. I am not really looking for any secrets myself, but could you imagine what could be learned from a database of the worlds history. I always imagined there would be some kind of info on harnessing the power of crystals or prisms or something cool like that but who knows. I wonder if they used the Dewey Decimal System? LOL We could always dig up the paw of the Sphinx, Edgar Cayse said there were copies located in Atlantis and Egypt in his trance-like state. If nothing else it gets the imagination going.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 01:56 PM
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well yeah we know that it was a repository for other peoples work, thats sorta how library's are supposed to work, it would be a university if it researched it's own stuff.

When all the works of the Greek's, Roman's, Egyptians. Babylonians, etc were collected together for a brief time it was the most complete library in the world - however then along came a crazy guy (catholic priest) who decided that it was an abomination, also all worth while things were already in the bible (such as when to stone your family, how to punish slaves, etc) so he ordered it burnt to the floor.

However, we all know that the Catholic Empire rose to power on a base of lies and fraud, the information gathering networks of the catholics was legendary (confession, torture, bribery, etc) and as the clergy well knew Knowledge is power - thus when they held mass book burnings and the like it was always the case that the Vatican made sure they had a copy of the forbidden knowledge. The Vatican did once have a forbidden library that much cannot be doubted, it's mentioned countless times in old papal texts , what happened to it we don't know -weather the pope does or now we don't know either.

As a good example of this sort of action by the Vatican i would suggest you visit it, the museum (very long and mostly boring) has a great selection of Egyptian objects, why? Because back in the day they made an effort to collect them and hide them away so that people wouldn't see that the Jesus story had been told before in Egyptian folk law, or because they might lead people to worship the old gods and the bible says not to do that.

So to deny that the vatican could have had any secrets just because the library was a library is crazy - many, many works were lost forever in that fire -Greek plays, Roman Historys, Mathmatics text books, etc, etc -maybe even the lost works of the sophists (the people plato trashed, we 'lost' all their ideas) which would be very useful if we ever wanted to understand how humanity came to be human. They might even know the REAL story of how we developed, Babylons real history maybe even some texts talking of Gobeki Tepe?

Plus they more likely than not have the lost records of the Celts who were wiped out by the Romans (pontus maximus was in charge of the looting armys, now in charge of the catholics) and maybe even some Vandal or Hun truth, oh and some south american toltec, mayan, etc knowledge. The Catholics have made a real effort to destroy the entire history and culture of many, many groups throughout history - of course they stole and hid the knowledge.

did it's location die out with some lost dynasty of Jesuits? Did some crazy firebrand clergyman burn it all to get satan out of the Vatican? Did it rot away and get chucked out as worthless by some devout but stupid monks?

One day we might know, one day we might be able to understand how we got into this mess - for now we just have to accept, everything and anything could be nothing like it seems.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by NatureBoy
well yeah we know that it was a repository for other peoples work, thats sorta how library's are supposed to work, it would be a university if it researched it's own stuff.

When all the works of the Greek's, Roman's, Egyptians. Babylonians, etc were collected together for a brief time it was the most complete library in the world -


Well the point is that you wouldn't find much classic works in Alexandria. Like I said, most of it's contents varied from maps to loggs. Not much interresting in other words. Besides, why would anyone sail out with unique knowledge onboard? I would guess they would make sure to use copies and copies of copies, knowing the dangers of sailing. Like I said, there was not much mystical about this library in the antique world, and perhaps even less today....



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 03:45 PM
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reply to post by Neo Christian Mystic
 


... did you read my post?

It was the most complete library in the world containing copies of most of the important works, those same works were ALL destroyed by other catholics over the next thousand years or so and hence huge chunks of text were lost, not until the arab scribes traded copies of them (mostly made at the library) back to the europeans did we see these works again.

When the library burnt we almost certainly lost some great works forever, there is even a list of books which are known to have been in the library which we now don't have - many, many greek philosophys and moral fables, histories, etc -- all lost forever because one group of bigots decided they were the only people worth listening to on the planet.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 03:48 PM
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reply to post by Neo Christian Mystic
 


You would be surprised at the amount of information that could be derived about their sociological interactions and psychological behaviours from seemingly mundane records...especially a large collection of such.

As well, it is likely that there were a variety of works kept in Alexandria.

So yeah, I'm thinking a great repository of information and 'secrets' were lost...



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 04:21 PM
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Originally posted by Neo Christian Mystic

Well the point is that you wouldn't find much classic works in Alexandria. Like I said, most of it's contents varied from maps to loggs. Not much interresting in other words.


You seem to be assuming that the boats only carried the crew. Most of the scholars during those periods travelled and learned from all over, as you say, Alexandria was a major part of this, many people would have come for the library alone, imparting knowledge as a privelage.


Besides, why would anyone sail out with unique knowledge onboard? I would guess they would make sure to use copies and copies of copies, knowing the dangers of sailing. Like I said, there was not much mystical about this library in the antique world, and perhaps even less today....


Not sure about mystical but I could only imagine some of the writings that could have been there, I think it was alot more than maps and logs.

EMM

[edit on 10-3-2009 by ElectroMagnetic Multivers]

[edit on 10-3-2009 by ElectroMagnetic Multivers]



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 04:21 PM
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Originally posted by NatureBoy
reply to post by Neo Christian Mystic
 


... did you read my post?


Yeah, and you fail when you say it was a regular collection. It wasn't it was a depository where merely written or drawn contents on ships seeking harbour in Egypt were copied and stored. Why would anyone bring a classic masterpiece on a merchantship anyway? Do you know what such a book would be worth back then? And the indexes I have seen vary from boring shipnames and their respective loggs mostly. What would probably be interresting there would be the maps they carried. Not much more. Back then a copy of Eratosthenes' Geography would be worth millions of dollars as would any book of the same size. Noone would carry this on a ship. They carried maps and loggs, and some popular writings and pornography. Not much more. You give sailors too much credit. Today like back then sailors doesn't read classics, and back then they didn't even read or write, so appart from understanding maps and stars etc. there wasn't much to tell.....

[edit on 10/3/2009 by Neo Christian Mystic]



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 04:28 PM
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It's been very well established that many, many things were lost in the Library, when it was destroyed. Works in literature. Science, and geology, as well as medicine. Histories of ancient peoples that we, today, only suspect existed.

It was a great loss. Who knows where we'd be as a race today.

The library was the MIT of its day, with more than a little dash of the Library of Congress added to it.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 04:37 PM
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Well established? Perhaps among romantics. But the Library was the storehouse of the Egyptian customs toll police. Now would you go there to get knowledge and classics? I don't think so. The reason it was so big was that there was loads of bogus there noone would care to read. And that wasn't the point. Up through the ages Egypt has proven to be brilliant in being fascist. No ship entering an Egyptian harbour couldn't sail on until all written material onboard was copied. It's politically motivated, nothing else. Like their ban on papyrus-export to Greece at the same time, not to mention their dispute with Rome which probably led to the destruction of the library by good ol' Julius. It's a popular myth that there was anything interresting at all in Alexandria Library.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 04:40 PM
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Originally posted by Neo Christian Mystic
It's a popular myth that there was anything interresting at all in Alexandria Library.


Source please...

Otherwise we are just waxing philisophical...



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 04:43 PM
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reply to post by Neo Christian Mystic
 


Really? Then there are alot of historians in several different eras who'd disagree somewhat vociferously.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 05:00 PM
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It's the same as with the hanging gardens of Babylon, the Kolossos of Rhodos, the endavours of Archimedes and so on. Anything big that was destroyed is always great myth material. Never mind Atlantis! They were freaking geneouses who were probably on the moon and they were gods and so on. Give me a break!

Just because a myth is mentioned many times and seems to get ever more elusive every take, well, I don't buy it. Compared to any modern school library the Alexandrian one wouldn't even compare in size and numbers of books. Back then there was probably one book for every tenthousand men, and Europe wasn't exactly big back then. And concidering how it would take a scribe years to copy a book, well, you get the picture. You should anyway.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by Neo Christian Mystic
You should anyway.


I shouldn't anything without a source...



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 05:11 PM
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A source for something that is lost? And which when looking at what was kept there was mostly handwritten bogus about seaserpents and Neptune destroying a sail east of Cyprus and inaccurate maps and lists of what and what not. You are merely baffled over the library since it was basically the only one in existance. The only thing I could imagine was interresting would be a map over where the Minoan civilisation AKA Atlantis was located and what the islands looked like before San Torini destroyed the place.....



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 05:15 PM
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To the OP:

you said: "trying to bring some kind of mystery into a totally uninterresting subject. "

Since the contents of the Library in its entirety cannot be confirmed, it is a "Mystery"as to what the collection contained. Simple as that.

If the fruit of all your research is so "un-interesting" as you put it, then why research it at all, and why open a thread to discuss the topic? Wouldn't a discussion about something that you find un-interesting, be even more un-interesting thus adding to the overall dis-interest in the subject all together?

I personally find the subject very interesting and I am glad you made this thread. Although I'm not even convinced the Library ever even really existed. The whole story could be an allegory for the concept of achieving great knowledge and losing it.

who knows



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 05:19 PM
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I tend to think that there were all kinds of copies of documents squirreled away all over Alexandria and Egypt in general. I saw a show not too long ago about the library in Timbuktu, which is trying to rebuild itself after a couple thousand years of attacks and abuse. And there is a continuing tradition of keeping old manuscripts buried in secret holes out in the desert.

Regardless of who attacked what when, a pretty good portion of the manuscripts (or copies) in the various Alexandria libraries were removed and hidden, likely in secret storehouses out in the desert. Like the Nag Hammurabi "library." A lot of interesting manuscripts hidden in a hole in the ground, then lost. We'll occasionally find some of those again.

But I think it's pretty unlikely that anything really Earth shattering, like proof of Atlantis or aliens, would be found in them. For one, the most important manuscripts are the ones people would work hardest to save, and for another, we have lists that can be used for cross-reference to see what documents we have and what ones are still missing. Nothing describing lost technologies of power crystals, ancient maps of America, or anything of the sort.

But interesting from a historical and anthropological perspective, at least. And certainly worth looking for.


[edit on 10-3-2009 by Nohup]



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by cynical572
Since the contents of the Library in its entirety cannot be confirmed, it is a "Mystery"as to what the collection contained. Simple as that.


Well, we know what was kept there. Loggs and maps mostly. It was all about control. Egypt demanded to copy whatever was written or drawn onboard ships docking in their harbours. Now, how many ancient shipwrecks have traces of classical works onboard? I sure haven't heared of any. And don't tell me they have been destroyed over time. We have many loggs and maps etc. discovered in quite old shipwrecks, so don't even try. To own a book back then was like owning a Mideavel castle these days. Not something many of us does. Get the point?

Like I said the Egyptian policy that led to the Library being built in the first place was all about control. It was a means to control ship traffic and to figure out who did and had done what. It was basically an ancient way of evesdropping or tapping. Intelligence and spying. Besides everyone docking in Egypt knew about this policy in advance, so they sure wouldn't dock in Egypt having great secrets onboard.

[edit on 10/3/2009 by Neo Christian Mystic]



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by Nohup

But interesting from a historical and anthropological perspective


And that would be the only reasons I have for romantisising about it...




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