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Can the Value of Pi be Changing?

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posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 10:59 PM
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Woohoo! One aye Thanks for the vote of support reticledc. I'm glad I wasn't completely shot down here.

Obsidience




posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 11:02 PM
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If you can't ask some vague, faceless poster on some wacky conspiracy site something you really want to know the answer to, who can you ask?



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 11:10 PM
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reply to post by obsidience
 


No, it doesn't really make any sense to argue for that. Pi is simply the relationship between a circle's diameter and its circumference. Physically. It can't change because otherwise it wouldn't be a circle.



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 11:29 PM
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Originally posted by obsidience
Kruel,
I also find your avatar image to be very fascinating...What is it!!!???


sorry for stepping on your toes, kruel.

kruel's avatar (how past and future interact)



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by obsidience
 


Pi cannot be changed
It is a mathematical fact or calculation,it is not physical matter, could you be refering to the change in the earths alignment that governed by the universe...........



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 12:02 AM
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Originally posted by Johnmike
reply to post by obsidience
 


No, it doesn't really make any sense to argue for that. Pi is simply the relationship between a circle's diameter and its circumference. Physically. It can't change because otherwise it wouldn't be a circle.


If one were to buy a hulahoop and extend a piece of the hulahoop into the event horizon of a black hole. What would the diameter of the circle be? Do the rules as to what we define a circle still apply? Is the hulahoop changing or is it the spacetime around the hulahoop?

Obsidience



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 12:16 AM
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Originally posted by Dr Love
I'm sorry, but some of you guys are talking way over my head. Explain it to me like I'm Mario Lopez.

Peace


Don't worry about it brother. They say pie are squared. They don't know what they're talking about. Cake are squared. Pie are round.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 03:36 AM
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Originally posted by Blaine91555
[

There is no guessing involved. You are trying to introduce abstracts. 1+1=2 will always be true. 1 apple + 1 orange=1 apple + 1 orange, not 2.



Why do you keep 2 away from 1 apple + 1 orange

when

1 apple + 1 orange = 2 pieces of fruit ?

Is it because

2 pices of fruit = 1 pear + x

doesn't have a unique solution?

Hell with the math restricted solutions and solve for x: x = cherry.

The rest is easy: cherry + pi =



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by obsidience
 


I don't get why it would, really. I haven't gone through the specifics of singularities, but there's no indication to me that something so simple would change. I don't even know how it would, let alone why. It's like speculating that 1+1=3 in a singularity, except geometrically, and that's pretty impossible.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 11:25 AM
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Originally posted by Johnmike
reply to post by obsidience
 


I don't get why it would, really. I haven't gone through the specifics of singularities, but there's no indication to me that something so simple would change. I don't even know how it would, let alone why. It's like speculating that 1+1=3 in a singularity, except geometrically, and that's pretty impossible.

Singularity is a point where all the matter of the universe was squeezed in once, as the cosmological bedtime story goes. With so much pressure, 1 + 1 = 3 is possible coz the mighty squeeze renders the inequality as 11=3, which is true, coz 11(bin) = 3 (dec).

[edit on 3/10/2009 by stander]



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 10:44 PM
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I have no idea where binary came from.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 11:25 PM
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Pi is infinitely long due only to our base 10 numbering system.
If you were to figure Pi in binary you would get 11.001001
I don't have an app handy to test how long Pi would be in base 2 (binary) or base 8 (oct) or base 16 (hex), but I would guess that the result would no longer be infinitely long.

Pi is a universal constant, but base 10 numbering is not.
Imagine trying to show your intelligence to an alien life form by tapping out Pi to the 100th digit repeatedly, only to discover that the alien only has 8 fingers so it uses a base 8 numbering system so Pi would be 3.110375... to our bug eyed alien friend.

eb



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 11:52 PM
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Originally posted by Razmear23
Pi is infinitely long due only to our base 10 numbering system.
If you were to figure Pi in binary you would get 11.001001
I don't have an app handy to test how long Pi would be in base 2 (binary) or base 8 (oct) or base 16 (hex), but I would guess that the result would no longer be infinitely long.

Pi is a universal constant, but base 10 numbering is not.
Imagine trying to show your intelligence to an alien life form by tapping out Pi to the 100th digit repeatedly, only to discover that the alien only has 8 fingers so it uses a base 8 numbering system so Pi would be 3.110375... to our bug eyed alien friend.

eb



Razmear23,

I understand the insignificance of base 10 however 1:1 binary to decimal conversion is simple. I suggest you read:

cs.furman.edu...

I also suggest you type in "what is pi in binary" into a google search box, google will telll you right away.

Nonetheless broaden your horizons a bit and understand that the math of physics is not base 10 or 2 but base pi and c and so on.

Take care!

Obsidience



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:24 AM
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reply to post by Razmear23
 


No, pi is infinitely long in any number system, including binary. It's an irrational number.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:43 AM
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Originally posted by Razmear23


Pi is a universal constant, but base 10 numbering is not.
Imagine trying to show your intelligence to an alien life form by tapping out Pi to the 100th digit repeatedly, only to discover that the alien only has 8 fingers so it uses a base 8 numbering system so Pi would be 3.110375... to our bug eyed alien friend.

eb


No, the aliens have ten digits on each hand as well and use decimal system too. But they know more about the nature of pi than we do.
Here, check it out:
www.dailymail.co.uk...



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 12:53 AM
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I don't think Pie should change...don't use Splenda! Ok...i'll shut up...



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 10:41 PM
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I guess the only way to connect pi with physics is via cosmophilosophy.
pispacetheory.storytwig.com...

But in all practicality, pi will always remain a handy messenger between some curves and straight lines.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 05:44 AM
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Pi is constant in euclidean space (the space we are familiar with).

Should a value of Pi be calculated where space is strongly curved, we would observe a different value to that which are are familiar with.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by Johnmike
I have no idea where binary came from.


Binary's a human concept and came from computing (in the 1940's) and from a mathematics of "base number concepts" (fairly old.) Binary became useful once computers developed, so it's an outgrowth of information theory in the 1930's. It's the foundational programming language. In a sense, though, it is the basis of any information (dits-and-dahs from telegraphy to the waves for television)

I can give you the whole lecture on it, but you don't want it. Trust me on this one. I can go on forever about it.



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 02:45 PM
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Originally posted by obsidience
Nonetheless broaden your horizons a bit and understand that the math of physics is not base 10 or 2 but base pi and c and so on.


Uh... not even close, I'm afraid. The math of physics is tensors and sets and algebras. No bases involved.



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