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'Invisibility Cloak' Directs Light Away From Eye

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posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 12:28 PM
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How does the cloaked person see out of the cloak? If light is being bent around then it would never reach the eyes... unless the eyes alone were uncloaked. Then you'd have a pair of eyes visible and nothing else.
Like the invisibility powerup in Quake.




posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by Leto
 


Cloak of Silence Design Unveiled

It is already a reality



posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 03:55 PM
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This cloaking device. Does it work the same as THIS?

Assuming it's not. A while back I read about some kind of similar mechanism called "Chameleonic" Optic Camouflage. Does the same thing but with the added benefit of concealing the wearer from Night Vision Observation Devices (NOD) as well as IR/Thermal Imaging devices. The mechanism can be applied also to vehicles (trucks, tanks, aircraft).

When asked how much weight the mechanism would add to an unmanned aerial drone, the inventor of the device replied "Less than two pounds."

You can read more about it below.


Optical Cloaking Technology for Urban Warfare and Counterinsurgency Operations

According to Dr. R. A. Zeineh (a.k.a. "Dr. Z"), his company's (Advanced American Enterprises) IR-Stealth 4.B combination thermal/IR (infrared)/night vision (NV) stealth system could have protected Israeli infantry warfighters from Hezbollah guerrilla fighters in Lebanon. One of the recent new documents we've received from AAE discusses how the Hizbollah guerrillas used night vision (NV) equipment to kill two Israeli commandos (out of a 4-man team) near Baalback, Lebanon.


Read the rest of the original article here.

(Note: There are some additional links beneath the article to related information.)

----
I always thought that photo-refractive optic stealth camouflage tech, similar to that featured in the video game "Metal Gear Solid" could be possible.

Ohhh...the wonders of the 21st Century. What will they think of next?



posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 11:24 PM
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Originally posted by johnsky
If it directs light away from the observer, wouldn't the observer see a black silhouette where the object should be?

I'd imagine that would be pretty useless in the day time.


My thoughts too!

The invisibility I know is either you bend light around you(could be achieved by fiber optic, but results aren't perfect for sure - like in predator movie at best) or you let light pass through you.



posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by ahnggk
 
agreed. without something to reflect back to the observer, the material would only be useful at night.

I guess.

jw



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 04:07 AM
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Originally posted by jdub297
reply to post by ahnggk
 
agreed. without something to reflect back to the observer, the material would only be useful at night.

I guess.

jw



Hmm, come to think of it, as long as you're working with a black background...

If you're thinking what I'm thinking, it could be used by spacecraft, satellites and high altitude aircraft!

It's funny, you could just use soot and get almost the same effect, only the bad part is soot heats badly when exposed to intense light, may amplify the damage caused by a high energy laser, than otherwise if it used a reflective surface.

Maybe the technology was intended for hiding space vehicles, cloaking them against the black backdrop of space without exaggerating the damage from weapons grade laser beams or the intense flash from nuclear explosions.

[edit on 9-3-2009 by ahnggk]



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 06:31 AM
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This has been doing the rounds for over 15 years now, I remember reading an articulo in my local newspaper that reported that wars will be fought very quickly due to this type of technology.

I wonder why the revival of the 'light reflecting soldiers' is in the media again?



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 06:59 AM
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Originally posted by broli
If built right nothing optical can detect these. It could be made to bend the whole electromagnetic spectrum around it. Thus no radar, no microwaves, no infrared, no UV can bounce to the person scanning.

As for actually body heat or something else, you don't need nano tech to do that. But it can be done if one wants the ultimate shield by reversing the process on the inside to make the infrared waves keep traveling on the surface inside effectively trapping them.

Sonar can be absorbed so that leaves sound detection with not much chance. Maybe if you pore paint on the cloak it'll become visible.

[edit on 6-3-2009 by broli]


the problem to me seems to be that the light is reflected in some direction. maybe not the direction you would be looking from, but if there were other people standing around they would be able to see it refleced back in their direction. at least that is how i interpeted the ariticle.



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 10:12 AM
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Originally posted by ahnggk

Originally posted by johnsky
If it directs light away from the observer, wouldn't the observer see a black silhouette where the object should be?

I'd imagine that would be pretty useless in the day time.


My thoughts too!

The invisibility I know is either you bend light around you(could be achieved by fiber optic, but results aren't perfect for sure - like in predator movie at best) or you let light pass through you.



You are missing something major. What about absorption/adsorption? The intake and altering of the lightwave into a band that is out of our range of perceptoin, for example.

It IS being done, and has been for quite a while. The process is much simpler than the metamaterials approach....but still somewhat compex nonetheless.



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 11:24 AM
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What happens if they lose the cloak?

How will they ever find it?

Or what if said soldier with cloak on is shot dead. How will they find him?

[edit on 9/3/2009 by xxpigxx]



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by jdub297



Can you imagine a special op's team cloaked in light bending shields. What on earth could stop an invisible soldier?






An invisible enemy



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 06:04 PM
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I saw a shirt a few years ago that had cameras on the back so looking at the guy it looked like his chest wasn't there... actually i think it was a poncho. There was some talk in the article about applying it to tanks. That was in main stream media.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 10:11 AM
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Originally posted by pianopraze
I saw a shirt a few years ago that had cameras on the back so looking at the guy it looked like his chest wasn't there... actually i think it was a poncho. There was some talk in the article about applying it to tanks. That was in main stream media.


Indeed, I remember that, the video could very well be on our beloved YOUTUBE. Its pretty freaky! very cleverly done. I think it may have been the chinese who did that experiement. Not entirely sure.



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 11:00 AM
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This may be what you saw,

I think a professor at the University of Tokyo is responsible for these, he was the first to be publicly known to make a cloaking device. It was cloaking jacket...



[edit on 11-3-2009 by Odins Advocate]



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 04:26 PM
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The system used in the Japanese videos works by mounting a video projector next to the camera lens. The projector displays a video of the desired background, and the "cloak" materials are retroreflective, returning the projected image back to the camera. Alas, the coveted "invisibility cloak" is still just a dream.

There are emerging systems which might be applied to a more authentic active camo. OLEDs and possibly miniaturized versions of "mechanical displays" like this one,


could be adapted for such applications.


[edit on 11-3-2009 by zerotensor]



posted on Mar, 14 2009 @ 10:19 AM
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reply to post by jimmyx
 
seems that 'scatter' would eliminate that problem, so long as there was not enough light refracted in any one specific direction. Sort of like what stealth tech does to radar.



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