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'Invisibility Cloak' Directs Light Away From Eye

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posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 10:57 AM
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'Invisibility Cloak' Directs Light Away From Eye


dsc.discovery.com

A new metamaterial created by Rice University scientists could hide objects from human sight.

By creating perfectly aligned dimples in a material, the scientists channeled specific wavelengths of light from many directions into one uniform direction.

The first "invisibility cloak," which hid objects from radio waves, was created in 2006 by scientists from Duke. Since then scientists have tried to create ever-smaller structures to manipulate the visible spectrum of light.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
dsc.discovery.com

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Researchers develop 2-D invisibility cloak
Japanese scientists spawn invisibility cloak




posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 10:57 AM
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What we imagine becomes reality! Harry Potter lives in Houston!

This definitely is the next step in soldier evolution.

Can you imagine a special op's team cloaked in light bending shields. What on earth could stop an invisible soldier?

If this device can bend and distort light bouncing off, can it also hide a heat signature? They could be cloaked thermally and visibly!


dsc.discovery.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 11:00 AM
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Huh....that IS pretty damn cool.
I don't think I have every looked at "cloaking " tech from that angle. Good find my friend S&F for you.



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 11:01 AM
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Originally posted by jdub297




Can you imagine a special op's team cloaked in light bending shields. What on earth could stop an invisible soldier?



A device that can detect them, maybe detecting heat or something, hmm.

Seriously I want a invisibilty cloak!! I doubt they would sell it thou, too dangerous.

[edit on 6-3-2009 by _Phoenix_]



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 11:19 AM
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If built right nothing optical can detect these. It could be made to bend the whole electromagnetic spectrum around it. Thus no radar, no microwaves, no infrared, no UV can bounce to the person scanning.

As for actually body heat or something else, you don't need nano tech to do that. But it can be done if one wants the ultimate shield by reversing the process on the inside to make the infrared waves keep traveling on the surface inside effectively trapping them.

Sonar can be absorbed so that leaves sound detection with not much chance. Maybe if you pore paint on the cloak it'll become visible.

[edit on 6-3-2009 by broli]



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by broli
 


What happens when this object moves?



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by djvexd
 

Rice University has always had an "egghead" reputation. This really looks like a viable product from what I've read about other attempts and possible aplications.

Too bad Sharper Image is gone. They'd be in their Christmas lineup, no doubt.

jw



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by broli
 

My guess is Rice was working on a grant from DARPA or DoD and that all these considerations are being rolled into one product.

From what I understand, vehicles, even tanks, buildings and aircraft could utilize this, although the "dimples" would affect aerodynamics. Slow-moving or rotor-bladed aircraft could conceivably benefit.

We'll see. No, I guess we won't, will we? Isn't that the point?

jw



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 04:46 PM
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If it directs light away from the observer, wouldn't the observer see a black silhouette where the object should be?

I'd imagine that would be pretty useless in the day time.

Either way, interesting development regardless. Might be useful in optical communications. Multiple sources of light all heading in one direction...

WAH! Fiber optics! This would allow fiber optic communications to be spliced without electronic repeaters!



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 01:43 AM
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Originally posted by jdub297


This definitely is the next step in soldier evolution.

Can you imagine a special op's team cloaked in light bending shields. What on earth could stop an invisible soldier?

If this device can bend and distort light bouncing off, can it also hide a heat signature? They could be cloaked thermally and visibly!


dsc.discovery.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


Yes that's quite impressive, but even more impressive would be a robotic special op team cloaked in light bending shields.

We would no longer need to put American lives at risk, and the invisibility would make the robots even more cost-effective.



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 01:50 AM
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Invisibility does not include nullifying sound.

This reminds me of an old cartoon about the Philly eperiment, where we see a wake from an invisible ship, but the flag and conn tower and soldiers standing on deck are still visible.


This "cloak" would be given away by light distortions, especially when the one wearing the material moves, and then also, the sound of their movement.

IMO I think putting soldiers behind cloaked material is somewhat chicken poop. Might as well send in robots instead.

Heh, cloaked robots..and again, you got the sound problem and light distortion problem.

Not very practical no matter what is wrapped up inside the material...a living breathing soldier or a mechanical mass of click and bang robot.


Cheers!!!!



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 01:58 AM
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Originally posted by RFBurns
Heh, cloaked robots..and again, you got the sound problem and light distortion problem.

Not very practical no matter what is wrapped up inside the material...a living breathing soldier or a mechanical mass of click and bang robot.



Silent movement can be perfected, once that's achieved a cloaked robot could be just as silent as the best trained ninjas.



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 02:30 AM
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i guess sprinkler fields may be the new defense against this. haha or snow. it will screw up the spectum. it wont work if theres any liquid.



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 12:42 PM
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reply to post by ghostlandseller
 


Unless its liquid resistance. Damn haven't thought of that. The liquid could just drip off it like it was frictionless. As for being spotted by moving due to some distortion. Sure but this can be perfected in later generations. Even with the distortions it's still 1.000.000x better than any camouflage out there. Using this as an argument to make it sound useless is stupid.

None the less this makes people wonder why we rarely see ufo's. If this take can be achieved by primitive apes so to speak then how far does alien tech go.



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by broli
If this take can be achieved by primitive apes so to speak then how far does alien tech go.


Likely farther than in Star Trek.



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 01:37 PM
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Maybe already in use? (Apologies for the source. Best with the sound turned down too.)

Prepared to have your eyes pop out about 3 minutes in:





posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


WHOA, that was freaky. I would like to see the original without the "red circle" tracking the object.

Impressive.



posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 12:45 AM
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reply topost by pause4thought:

Someone tried to refute or explain this elsewhere, but I'm pretty impressed. It seems he blends into whatever he's if front of, even on the tank.



posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 03:06 AM
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I have heard of several invisibility cloaks now, this being a newer one. The one I hav seen, well not seen, if you get me was made of fine diamonds, also hold vibrations, and it made it look like nothing was there. All I know is invisibility is definatly a real thing happening, yet the masses are still struggling to even question 9/11. We will keep researching and be the leaders of the future world.

Also if tht was back in 2006, well it's three years on now, I'm sure the suit would be a little more upgraded....



posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by kingdogol
microwave invisibility was publicized in 2006. Rice's visible spectrum work is current, but I'm sure we're finding out about it only because it is being patented. No doubt it has been 'refined' over a couple of years, at least.




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