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Question about rings.

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posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 10:37 AM
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It's blatantly obvious that our moon affects our oceans, everyone thats passed 2nd grade knows that. And I wouldn't doubt for asecond that the moons of other planets affect it's geography as well, not just the liquid on the planet, right?

Also, do the rings of the gas giants affect it's primary in any way? Like, the Giant Red Spot on Jupiter.... Would taking away any of Jupiter's moons change it's speed or path or anything?

Thanks for your time,
Schmidt1989




posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 10:44 AM
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Hi, spacial ATSers.

Pay long visits there:

CASSINI_SATURN.
saturn.jpl.nasa.gov...

NASA Phoenix.
www.nasa.gov...

Mars Explor Rover Mission.
marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov...

That can be a good start, for jumping to other planets. B-)

Blue skies.

[edit on 2009/3/6 by C-JEAN]



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 10:47 AM
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Just what exactly are you planning anyway?

A planet's moons don't affect its orbit around the Sun (other than causing a slight "wobble" perhaps). Removing a moon would have an effect but because the moons of the gas giants are so small in relation to the planet the effect would not be great. There may be effects on surface of the planet (in the case of Saturn, on its rings as well) due to the changes in tidal forces. Because of those tidal effects the rate of rotation of the planet may also be be affected slightly, over a long period of time.

[edit on 3/6/2009 by Phage]



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 02:40 PM
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When it comes to gas giants they regulate the temperature of their moons (example Europa and Titan) however there is not enough gravity for the moon to effect a gas giant. At least I don't think so.



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