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Company sold workers' secret data

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posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 04:47 AM
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Company sold workers' secret data


news.bbc.co.uk

The information watchdog has shut down a company which it says sold workers' confidential data, including union activities, to building firms.

A raid on The Consulting Association in Droitwich, Worcs, revealed a serious breach of the Data Protection Act, the Information Commissioner's Office said. The ICO said a secret system was run for over 15 years enabling employers to unlawfully vet job applicants.

Action is being considered against more than 40 firms who used the service.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 04:47 AM
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Obviously it's a good job that the Information Commissioner's Office dealt with this however, it's hard not to think that this is the tip of the iceberg and this, as many people have either claimed or merely pessimistically assumed, is a fairly common practices.

I find it genuinely worrying that someone's politics should be an issue - it's not just the 'far-right' that has problems with this. Similarly, the fact that someone was an "ex-shop steward" shouldn't be an issue to anyone unless they were concerned they couldn't shaft their employees.

The ties to Big Brother are worrying in a couple of ways too. Firstly, this demonstrates that personal and sensitive data does get abused despite how much the government likes to claim that we're being protected. Secondly, it makes me wonder whether these kinds of stories merely give the government another opportunity to implement safety features that are in their interests rather than ours when it comes to yet more 'databases'.

news.bbc.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 05:30 AM
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I've just read this same story myself and have to admit that I am not in the least bit surprised.

I have long suspected that all kinds of checks are carried out on us without us having any idea that they are going on.

Some of the comments that appear to have been made about some of the are absolutely disgusting and if I was mentioned on the list I'd definitely be looking at legal action against these people.

It's so, so wrong and as the OP claims, I think it is fair to believe that this is merely the tip of the iceberg.

Peace,

MGGG



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 08:52 AM
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UK - The National Staff Dismissal Register - The register is an initiative of Action Against Business Crime (AABC), a partnership between the Home Office and the British Retail Consortium and was set up by Surrey based, Hicom Business Solutions www.hicom.co.uk...

www.changeboard.com...
The database will allow employers to search for potential workers by name, address, date of birth, national insurance number and previous employer. Records on individuals – accessible online via an encrypted password system - will be kept for a five-year period and can include photos.

There appears to be no regulatory body monitoring the listings. Individuals can be included on the Register without any trial or criminal conviction, so there is a risk that it could be abused by employers. There is a real risk that individuals could be “blacklisted” from any organisation that has access to the information.

The TUC is seriously concerned that this register can only lead to people being shut out from the job market by an employer who falsely accuses them of misconduct or sacks them because they bear them a grudge. Individuals would be treated as criminals, even though the police have never been contacted.

The Criminal Records Bureau was set up to assist employers to make safe appointments when recruiting staff to work with vulnerable groups. The CRB already provides appropriate and properly regulated protection for employers. Under the new register, an employee may not be aware they have been blacklisted or have any right to appeal.



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 02:26 AM
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Originally posted by GFCAX
The Criminal Records Bureau was set up to assist employers to make safe appointments when recruiting staff to work with vulnerable groups. The CRB already provides appropriate and properly regulated protection for employers.


And unfortunately, aren't CRB checks actually being abused? I'm sure I've seen several reports that have shown many people are being made to have CRB checks for areas of employment which aren't really applicable. It seems they are almost becoming a default measure now, rather than solely dealing with the young and/or vulnerable.




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