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Australia Extreme Weather Event

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posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 06:57 AM
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edit for double post

[edit on 7-3-2009 by Trigger82]




posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 07:03 AM
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Yep I see it now

Wasnt on the previous threat map.

Hamilton Island has 56kmph sustained winds with gusts up to 76 at the moment, and that not even in the gale force zone on the threat map.

Im thinking that this may be one of the reasons why the QLD mets have upgraded it. Latest observations page below

www.bom.gov.au...



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 07:04 AM
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One thing I have learnt about Cyclones, it doesn't matter what the predicted path is, they can just do a complete U turn and change directions in a matter of hours.
Happens more when they sit still for a while.

And in reply to the bit about the difference between hurricanes and cyclones, they spin in opposite directions, Cyclones are clockwise and hurricanes are counter clockwise.
as for the strength of them, Hurricanes tend to be much larger than cyclones and cover a larger area, cyclones are smaller and generally can pack a mighty big punch



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 07:15 AM
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Originally posted by munkey66
One thing I have learnt about Cyclones, it doesn't matter what the predicted path is, they can just do a complete U turn and change directions in a matter of hours.
Happens more when they sit still for a while.


They can, but that doesnt mean they will. There is a general pattern of movement which I explained earlier in the thread. Sitting still is not an indicator that they will change direction, the steering winds are the main culprit in determining the track



And in reply to the bit about the difference between hurricanes and cyclones, they spin in opposite directions, Cyclones are clockwise and hurricanes are counter clockwise.


Yep, that is true, due to the coriolis effect. Same happens with low pressure and high pressure systems. Low pressure spins clockwise in the souhtenr hemisphere and anti clockwise in the northern hemisphere, while high pressure systems spin clockwise in the northern hemisphere and anti clockwise in the southern hemisphere



as for the strength of them, Hurricanes tend to be much larger than cyclones and cover a larger area, cyclones are smaller and generally can pack a mighty big punch


Thats incorrect. The area of a cyclone can be huge, (check TC Vance) or small (check TC Tracy). The only reason hurricanes are stronger than cyclones is that there is more heating over a larger body of water. The ocean is the feeding factor of such storms, and the longer they are over warm water, the more potential they have to become stronger. This is why circular storms die over land, because there is no energy to feed them.

[edit on 7/3/2009 by OzWeatherman]



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 07:21 AM
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reply to post by OzWeatherman
 

I was talking in general about the size comparison,

Living in an area where cyclones come and go, I understand about the movement of them, just look at TC ingrid.

[edit on 7-3-2009 by munkey66]



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 07:30 AM
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Originally posted by munkey66
reply to post by OzWeatherman
 

I was talking in general about the size comparison,

Living in an area where cyclones come and go, I understand about the movement of them, just look at TC steve, it tried to circum navigate Australia


Hey I live in Darwin and work for the Bureau of Meterology here, so obviously I also know about the movement and characteristics of them


Steve was an interesting case, because it moved westwards, died over the cape, reintensified as it crossed the warm waters of the gulf, rounded us to the south, then intensified more off WA, then swung south west as it crossed near Carnarvon, as it crossed land it continued to decay and finally completely lost its structure in the great australian bight. It lasted eleven days which is an exceptional amount of time



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 02:15 PM
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Here's the latest threat map, updated an hour or so ago



Looks like its going to lose a little bit of its kcik as it crosses the whitsundays, nothing unusual there, but still high winds



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 10:46 PM
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www.wunderground.com...

www.wunderground.com...

It's 150 mph at the moment.



posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 05:09 PM
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Current threat map, still has it only grazing the coast




posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 07:04 PM
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5 Cyclone (Hurricane) 260kph winds bearing down on Australian east coast

Australia Northeast shores fear hurricane, floods
Updated at: 1301 PST, Sunday, March 08, 2009
www.geo.tv...

SYDNEY: Thousands of holidaymakers fled one of Australia's top tourist destinations Sunday as a tropical cyclone lashed the country's northeast coast.

Authorities in Queensland state ordered the evacuation of Fraser Island as Tropical Cyclone Hamish approached the World Heritage-listed site shortly after it was upgraded to a category five storm, the most severe on the weather scale. The cyclone has been tracking south about 120 kilometres (75 miles) off the Queensland coast, but meteorologists warn its path is unpredictable and it could veer onto the mainland, potentially sparking a major disaster.

Queensland Emergency Services Minister Neil Roberts said three islands were evacuated Sunday -- Fraser, Heron and Lady Elliot -- bringing the total number of tourist islands cleamated 500 million dollars (321 million US) in damage to crops and infrastructure. Even it remains offshore, the storm could cause major flooding, high seas and wind gusts reaching up to 100 kilometres (62 miles) an hour.



Thousands flee Australia cyclone
UPDATED ON:
Sunday, March 08, 2009
18:52 Mecca time, 15:52 GMT
english.aljazeera.net...

Thousands of tourists and residents have been evacuated from Australia's islands on the Great Barrier Reef, as a tropical cyclone battered the region, state officials said.

Evacuations were carried out on Sunday, following warnings from the weather bureau that Cyclone Hamish could cause substantial damage and flooding, with the
storm packing winds of up to 295kph.

Despite the Bureau of Meteorology downgrading Hamish to a category 4 storm, the second highest level, up to 3,000 people were evacuated from the popular tourist destination of Fraser Island, a spokesman for Queensland state's emergency services minister, said.

"They are being moved off the island by barge. The process has been under way most of the day," the spokesman said. He said evacuations were also planned for other islands.

Although the damage reported from the cyclone has so far been limited, Anna Bligh, Queensland's prime minister, has declared a "disaster situation" in response to the storm.

Sugar farmers in Queensland, who produce 95 per cent of Australia's sugar crop, are already facing substantial losses, battling floods since December 2008 after a number of storms and cyclones.

Thousands of cattle are also thought to have died in earlier flooding in the area.
www.goes.noaa.gov...
www.nrlmry.navy.mil...

Looks to be pretty bad!!!


[edit on 3/8/2009 by Hx3_1963]



posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 07:08 PM
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reply to post by Hx3_1963
 


Yep, been downgraded now, but still strong enough to cause significant damage. Most the models are keeping it off shore which is good, but I still think the coast should get a fair drenching out of it

Gladstone 512km radar gives a good picture of the eye wall, and rain bands



www.bom.gov.au

(I know it says its copywrited but Ive provided a reference and I work for the bureau of meteorology)




[edit on 8/3/2009 by OzWeatherman]




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