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nibiru location

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posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 12:02 AM
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It seems like it is in or near our solar system?

Top image is older than the bottom image

[edit on 6-3-2009 by star in a jar]




posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 01:10 AM
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reply to post by star in a jar
 


How do you know when the images were made? I'm sure you are aware that the WWT images are not real time or even close to it. The optical images are all at least 10 years old. BTW, both objects currently appear in WWT.

The source images are from the second Palomar Sky Survey which was conducted from 1987 through 1998.

The first object (5h49m15s, -4:02:37) only appears in the original image from the POSS/UKSTU Red survey. It may be an actual object but it does not appear in the blue or infrared surveys so is more likely a photographic or scanning flaw.

The second object (5h34m30s, -2:10:15) does not appear in any of the original images so is probably an artifact of WWT processing.

You can retrieve the source photos here:
archive.stsci.edu...

[edit on 3/6/2009 by Phage]



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 05:56 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by star in a jar
 


How do you know when the images were made? I'm sure you are aware that the WWT images are not real time or even close to it. The optical images are all at least 10 years old. BTW, both objects currently appear in WWT.

The source images are from the second Palomar Sky Survey which was conducted from 1987 through 1998.

The first object (5h49m15s, -4:02:37) only appears in the original image from the POSS/UKSTU Red survey. It may be an actual object but it does not appear in the blue or infrared surveys so is more likely a photographic or scanning flaw.

The second object (5h34m30s, -2:10:15) does not appear in any of the original images so is probably an artifact of WWT processing.

You can retrieve the source photos here:
archive.stsci.edu...

[edit on 3/6/2009 by Phage]


i would say u check your info first as in thes pics added by jar are 1 day old and are in the middle of orian and the you tube vid is over a yer old it shows how its moving through orian

and by saying mwt pics are 10 years old when nibiru is about 5 billion miles away what we see through a telescope is older than man



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 05:57 AM
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Originally posted by star in a jar


It seems like it is in or near our solar system?

Top image is older than the bottom image

[edit on 6-3-2009 by star in a jar]


great pics jar thanks



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 06:01 AM
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previous reply was for phage



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 06:10 AM
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mwt is in real time as for 3 weeks it has been moveng 1 degri every day and not allways ra an dec some days both move today


location 5h 34m 30s -2 10:13 yesterday ra and dec changed
today just dec please check for yourselfs or keep a daily check
and you will see what i have

thanks dean



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 07:22 AM
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reply to post by thegeezer
 


MWT uses archival data from old sky surveys, it is not real-time. There's no telescope in the world that could survey the entire sky, north and south hemispheres, in a single night. I see nothing in authoritative sources of those sky surveys, so I agree with phage that it's a processing artifact.
archive.stsci.edu...



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 07:34 AM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by star in a jar
 


How do you know when the images were made? I'm sure you are aware that the WWT images are not real time or even close to it. The optical images are all at least 10 years old. BTW, both objects currently appear in WWT.

The source images are from the second Palomar Sky Survey which was conducted from 1987 through 1998.

The first object (5h49m15s, -4:02:37) only appears in the original image from the POSS/UKSTU Red survey. It may be an actual object but it does not appear in the blue or infrared surveys so is more likely a photographic or scanning flaw.

The second object (5h34m30s, -2:10:15) does not appear in any of the original images so is probably an artifact of WWT processing.

You can retrieve the source photos here:
archive.stsci.edu...

[edit on 3/6/2009 by Phage]


Google has struck a partnership with scientists building a huge sky-scanning telescope, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), on a mountaintop in Chile, with hopes of helping the public with a "people's telescope" to provide access to real-time digital footage of asteroids, supernovas and distant galaxies. Officials say the telescope will open "a movie-like window" on nearby asteroids and far-off exploding stars, and help explore the mysterious "dark energy" believed to fuel the universe's expansion.





posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


1962 April 26
Ariel 1 (UK) investigated Solar UV and X-radiation, and obtained an energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays.
1964 March 27
Ariel 2 (UK) Radio astronomy
1966 April 8 (Atlas-Agena D)
Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO) 1 (Nasa). Active for 3 days.
1967 May 5
Ariel 3 (UK) Radio astronomy
1968 July 4
Explorer 38 (RAE-1) (Nasa). Radio Astronomy Explorer. Deployed four 230-m antennae, discovered Earth's radio radiation.
1968 December 7 (Atlas-Centaur)
OAO 2 (Nasa). 11 UV telescopes, discovered a supernova (May 1972)
1970 November 30 (Atlas-Centaur)
OAO-B (Nasa). Launch failure (fell into Atlantic).
1970 December 12 (Scout-B, from Italy's San Marco maritim platform near Kenia's coast)
Explorer 42 (SAS-1, SAS-A, Uhuru) (Nasa) First X-ray satellite observatory.
Uhuru page at HEASARC (GSFC, Nasa)
1971 December 11
Ariel 4 (UK) Radio astronomy
1972 March 12
TD-1A (ESA). Thor Delta satellite 1A. UV, X-ray and Gamma-ray instruments. TD-1A page (HEASARC)
1972 August 21 (Atlas-Centaur)
OAO 3(=OAO-C, Copernicus) (Nasa). 80-cm UV telescope, then the heaviest scientific US payload (2220 kg).
OAO-3 (Copernicus) page (HEASARC)
1972 November 15 (Scout-B, from San Marco)
Explorer 48 (SAS-2, SAS-B) (Nasa). Gamma-ray spark-chamber telescope. SAS 2 page (HEASARC)
1973 June 10 (Thor-Agena Delta)
Explorer 49 (RAE-2) (Nasa) Radio Astronomy Explorer. Lunar orbit.
1974 August 30
ANS-1 (Netherlands) UV, X-ray astronomy ANS page (HEASARC)
1974 October 15
Ariel 5 (UK) X-ray astronomy Ariel 5 page (HEASARC)
1975 April 19
Aryabhata (India): Indian Scientific Satellite. Measured X-rays from Milky Way and extragalactic regions, besides Solar and ionosphere observations Aryabhata homepage (HEASARC)
1975 May 5
Explorer 53 (SAS-3, SAS-C) (Nasa). X-ray telescope. SAS 3 page (HEASARC)
1975 August 9
COS-B (ESA) X-ray, Gamma-ray. COS-B page (HEASARC, GSFC/Nasa)
1977 August 12 (Atlas-Centaur)
High Energy Astronomical Observatory (HEAO) 1 (Nasa) X-ray, Gamma-ray telescopes.
HEAO-1 page (HEASARC, GSFC/Nasa)
1978 January 26 (Thor-Delta)
International Ultraviolett Explorer (IUE) (ESA, Nasa, UK) 45-cm UV telescope Working for over 18 years; shut down and destroyed from healthy state on September 30, 1996, 18:42 UT, because of funding reasons. IUE homepage (GSFC/Nasa), IUE homepage (ESA), Images from IUE (STScI)
1978 November 13
HEAO 2 (Einstein) (Nasa) X-ray telescope. HEAO-2 (Einstein) page (HEASARC)
1979 February 21
Hakucho (Japan) Known as CORSA-b before launch on ; X-ray satellite. Hakucho homepage (HEASARC)
1979 February 24
P78-1 (Nasa) Shot down in USAF anti-satellite weapons test on September 13, 1985. P78-1 homepage (HEASARC)
1979 June 2
Ariel 6 (UK) X-ray astronomy. Ariel 6 page (HEASARC)
1979 June 7 (Intercosmos)
Bhaskara-I (India) Primarily an Earth observing satellite, it also carried an All-Sky monitor similar to Ariel-V. Bhaskara 1 info (Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay and ISRO)
1979 September 20
HEAO 3 (Nasa) Gamma-ray satellite. HEAO-3 page (HEASARC)
1981 February 20
Tenma (Japan). Known as Astro B prior to launch; X-ray satellite. Tenma homepage (HEASARC)
1983 January 26 (Delta 3910)
IRAS, Infra Red Astronomical Satellite (Nasa, Netherlands). IRAS homepage (IPAC, Caltech)
1983 March 23 (Proton D-1-e)
Astron-1 (USSR) Astrophysical satellite with an 80-cm UV telescope. Astron page (HEASARC)
1983 May 26 (Delta 3914)
Exosat (European X-ray Observatory Satellite, ESA). Exosat data center at ESTEC; Exosat homepage at HEASARC (GSFC/Nasa)
1987 February 5
Ginga (Japan); known as Astro-C prior to launch. X-ray satellite. Ginga homepage (ISAS), Ginga homepage (HEASARC)
1989 August 8 (Ariane 44 LP)
Hipparcos. Astrometric satellite. Although launched successfully, the spacecraft didn't achieve its desied high orbit. Nevertheless, it was highly successful and measured 118,000 star positions at 0.001 arc seconds acuracy, plus over 1 million positions at 0.025 arc seconds. Hipparcos homepage (ESTEC, NL; Esa)
1989 November 11 (Delta)
COsmic Background Explorer (COBE) Cobe Project homepage
1989 December 1 (D-1-e Proton)
Granat (USSR); Gamma ray observatory satellite. Granat homepage (HEASARC)
1990 April 5 (Space Shuttle STS-37, Atlantis F-8)
Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) (originally GRO) Compton Gamma Ray Observatory homepage, COMPTEL Collaboration
1990 April 24 (Space Shuttle STS-31)
Hubble Space Telescope (HST) (Nasa, ESA). Launched with improperly designed optics. Refurbished December 1993, STS-61. Further service missions were flown in February 1997 (SM-2, STS-82), December 1999 (SM-3A, STS-103), and in March 2001 (SM-3B, STS-109), a final service mission is currently scheduled for April 2008 (SM-4, STS-125). Hubble Project Homepage (GSFC/Nasa) Hubble Space Telescope homepage (STScI); Latest results; HST image archive at SEDS
1990 June 1 (Delta II)
Rosat (Roentgen Satellite) Rosat homepage at the MPE Garching; Rosat Homepage (HEASARC)
1990 July 11 (SL-4 Soyuz)
Gamma (USSR); Gamma ray astronomy. Gamma homepage (HEASARC)
1990 December 2 (STS-35, STS Columbia)
Astro-1 Space Shuttle mission, landed December 11, 1990. Carried several telescopes: UIT, BBXRT. BBXRT homepage (HEASARC)
1991 July 17 (Ariane 40)
SARA (French Highschool of Engeneers in Electrotechnics and Electronics, ESIEE). Radio astronomy.
1992 June 2 (Delta II)
Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) EUVE CEA homepage; EUVE homepage (HEASARC)
1992 July 31 (STS Atlantis)
Eureca (ESA) European Retrievable Carrier (reusable satellite). Carried Watch, the Wide-Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-rays (of 6-150 keV energy). Retrieved STS Endeavour on July 1, 1993. Eureca homepage (HEASARC)
1993 February 20 (Mu-3 S2)
ASCA, Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Asuka (formerly Astro-D, Japan). X-ray telescopes. ASCA page (HEASARC, GSFC/Nasa)
1993 April 25 (Pegasus)
Alexis (DoE, USA). Array of Low Energy X-ray Imaging Sensors. Built and controlled from LANL. Alexis homepage (LANL)
1994 November 1
GGS-Wind. Carried TGRS (Transient Gamma Ray Spectrometer). GGS-WIND homepage (HEASARC)
1995 March 18 (H-II)
IRTS/SFU (Japan). Infrared Telescope Satellite/Space Flyer Unit. IRTS homepage
1995 November 4
Surfsat. Student-built radio astronomical satellite
1995 November 17 (Ariane 44P)
ISO, Infrared Space Observatory (ESA). ISO homepage (ESTEC); ISO homepage at IPAC/Caltech
1995 December (Delta II)
Rossi X-rays Timing Explorer. XTE homepage (HEASARC)
1996 April 24 (Delta II)
MSX (US Navy): Midcourse Space Experiment. Carried IR instruments sensitive for radiation of 4.2 to 26 microns (micrometers) wavelength. MSX homepage (Navy Research Lab); MSX homepage (IPAC, Caltech); MSX Celestial Background page; MSX Celestial Background team
1996 April 30 (Atlas-Centaur)
SAX, Italian X-ray sat. SAX homepage (ASI), BeppoSAX page (TeSRE), SAX homepage (HEASARC)
1997 February 12
HALCA, VSOP, Muses-B (Japan): Highly Advanced Laboratory for Communications and Astronomy, VLBI Space Observatory Program. Radioastronomical satellite, carrying an 8-meter antenna to allow VLBI. Muses-B project info page at ISAS; Muses-B homepage; VSOP homepage
1997 April 21
Minisat 1 (Spain) carries the Low Energy Gamma-Ray Imager (LEGRI). Minisat homepage, LEGRI homepage (GSFC), Legri homepage (Univ. Valencia)
1998 December 5 (Pegasus XL/L-1011)
SWAS, Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Investigates water, molecular oxygen, CO, and atomic C emissions from interstellar clouds. In Nasa's Small Explorer (SMEX) Program. SWAS homepage (GSFC)
1999 February 23 (Delta)
ARGOS (Advanced Research and Global Observations Satellite). Carries the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) experiment.
1999 March 4 1999 (Pegasus)
WIRE (Wide Field Infrared Explorer). In Nasa's Small Explorer (SMEX) Program. This small satellite failed shortly after a flawless launch because of electronic failure destroying its cooling system. Some optical astronomy was still possible with the 5-cm guiding telescope. WIRE homepage (IPAC/Caltech), Wire page at GSFC (within the SMEX program), WIRE page at Cornell U.
1999 April 28 (Cosmos-3M)
ABRIXAS ("A Broad-Band Imaging All-Sky Survey", Germany) X-ray satellite. Failed during second day in orbit because of power supply failure. ABRIXAS homepage (MPE)
1999 June 24 (Delta)
FUSE (Nasa): Far UV Spectroscopic Explorer. FUSE homepage
1999 July 23 (Space Shuttle STS-93)
Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) (Nasa). Developed as Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). X-ray satellite. AXAF info from Harvard; Chandra XRO homepage (HEASARC); Chandra Homepage (Nasa); Chandra X-Ray Observatory Center (Harvard)
1999 December 10 (Ariane 5)
XMM Newton (ESA): High Throughput X-ray Spectroscopy mission. XMM homepage (ESA); XMM Newton Science Operations Center (ESA Villafranca, Spain)
2000 February 10
Astro-E (Japan). Complex X-ray observatory. Lost during launch attempt. Succeeded by Astro-E2 (see below). Astro E page (HEASARC)
2000 October 9 (Pegasus)
HETE-2: High Energy Transient Explorer. To detect GRBs and observe in X-ray and Gamma ray radiation. HETE-2 Homepage (HEASARC)
2001 June 30 (Delta II 7425-10)
MAP: Microwave Anisotropy Probe. MAP homepage
2002 October 17
Integral (ESA, Russia, Nasa): International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory. X- and Gamma ray observatory (15 keV to 10 MeV at a resolution of 12 arc minutes). Integral homepage (ESA)
2003 January 12
CHIPSat (GSFC/Nasa/U Berkeley): Cosmic Hot Interstellar Plasma Spectrometer. Carries out all-sky spectroscopy of the diffuse background at wavelengths from 90 to 260 Angstrom. CHIPSat homepage (U Berkeley)
2003 April 28 (Pegasus XL)
GALEX (JPL/Nasa): Galaxy Evolution Explorer. UV imaging and spectroscopic survey mission. GALEX homepage (Caltech), GALEX page (JPL)
2003 June 30
MOST (Canada): Microvariability and Oscillations of STars. Successfully launched from Plesetsk, Russia into a 820-km orbit. Carries a small (15-cm aperture) telescope, to look for tiny light variations at stars in order to detect e.g. small-amplitude star oscillations or occultations by planets. MOST homepage (Univ. British Columbia)
2003 August 25 (Delta 7920H)
Spitzer Space Telescope (SST) (JPL/Nasa): Developed as Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Large IR telescope in a sophistivated Solar orbit. SIRTF homepage (JPL)
2004 November 20 (Delta II 7320)
Swift (GSFC/Nasa). Multi-wavelength mission to study Gamma-Ray Bursts in X-ray and UV/optical. Swift homepage (GSFC)
2005 July 10 (M-V-6)
Suzaku, Astro-E2 (Japan): X-ray astronomy for 0.4-700 keV radiation. Backup for lost Astro-E. Astro E2 homepage (ISAS); Astro-E2 page (HEASARC)
2006 February 26 (M-V)
Akari, Astro-F, IRIS (Japan): Infrared Imaging Surveyor. IRIS homepage (ISAS)
2007 April 23 (PSLV-C8)
Agile (ASI, Italy). AGILE - Astro-rivelatore Gamma a Immagini LEggero. Successfully launched with a PSLV (Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle) of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) from Sriharikota, India. Gamma-ray astronomy satellite, measuring photons of energy above 100 MeV. Agile Homepage (INAF)
2008 June 11 (Delta 2)
GLAST (GSFC/Nasa): Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope. Successfully launched from KSC. GLAST homepage

Future: (some of these are in early projection phase only)

2008 September (GSLV)
GSAT-4 (Israel/India): To carry the UV telescope TAUVEX (Tel Aviv University Ultraviolet Explorer), originally scheduled as Israeli part of SXG. TAUVEX homepage (Indian Institute of Astrophysics)
2008 October
RadioAstron (Russia): Radio astronomy satellite. RadioAstron Project Web Site (RSSI)
2008 October 31 (Ariane 5, together with Planck)
Herschel, FIRST (Esa): Far IR and Submillimeter Space Telescope (85 to 900 microns). Herschel homepage (ESA)
2008 October 31 (Ariane 5, together with Herschel)
Planck, former COBRAS/SAMBA (ESA): Cosmic Background Radiation Anisotropy Satellite/Satellite for Measurement of Background Anisotropy. Planck homepage (ESA)
2009 February
Kepler (Nasa): Space-based search for extrasolar planets. Kepler Homepage
2009 April
Astrosat (India) UV and X-ray observations.
2009 (Delta-3)
SIM: Space Interferometer Mission. SIM homepage (JPL/Nasa)
2009
WISE (Nasa): Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer.
2009
LISA Pathfinder (ESA): Testing concepts for gravitational wave detection to prepare LISA mission. LISA Pathfinder homepage (ESA)
NET 2009 (Taurus)
DUO, Dark Universe Observatory (Nasa, Germany) X-ray survey. In essence, a reflight of ABRIXAS. DUO page (Nasa), DUO homepage (Sonoma State Univ)



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 08:15 AM
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Browse the Sky with WorldWide Telescope from Microsoft Research ...
Tonight, Microsoft Research has made available the Spring Beta of WorldWide ... WorldWide Telescope observes the night sky in real-time (which is awesome)



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 09:11 AM
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reply to post by thegeezer
 


Real time meaning that the elevation and azimuth of the stars in the sky corresponds to the real time positions. It is an astronomy program.


Q. Does WorldWide Telescope provide real-time data?
A. WorldWide Telescope shows you where items are in space today but all the images are from different ground- and space-based telescopes, and that content is from varying times in the past.

www.worldwidetelescope.org...

You are looking at the DSS dataset. The digitized version of the Palomar Sky Survey. If you click the "research" button in WWT you can get the source of the image.

The LSST that Google is partnering on will not be operational until 2013. (We are not talking about Google Sky, btw. Your object does not appear in Google Sky).
www.dailygalaxy.com...

The images are not real time.

Please check the positions I gave for the images from star in a jar. The objects are in completely different locations and both appear in their own positions. They are not the same object.


[edit on 3/6/2009 by Phage]



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 09:15 AM
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Originally posted by thegeezer
Browse the Sky with WorldWide Telescope from Microsoft Research ...
Tonight, Microsoft Research has made available the Spring Beta of WorldWide ... WorldWide Telescope observes the night sky in real-time (which is awesome)

It is not realtime observation. Tell me, how could a telescope see the entire celestial sphere all at once, or all the stars on the daytime side of the earth? You know that little IRAS survey you guys say is no longer available?
en.wikipedia.org...
That mission ended a long time ago, it was not realtime data. MWT is not observing the sky in realtime.

I would bet good money that if I took my scope out tonight and did a deep space image of those coordinates, there'd be nothing there.

[edit on 6-3-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 01:12 PM
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I snooped around and the 'old' orange blur is still there, as well as the new, and I marked their locations-

i637.photobucket.com...

But if some of the above posters are right, and the mission to map the skies has ended, and the data is 10 years old, then goes our chance to detect any dangerous bodies heading towards Earth.

I'm sure the military has access to space information we don't but that's the price we paid for sleeping.

[edit on 6-3-2009 by star in a jar]



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 01:22 PM
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I'm with Phage and Ngchunter on this one!!!

Not that it has anything to do with my understanding of astronomy (which is none!!) but these two gentlemen really know what they are talking about if you'd read a couple of threads they were involved in...

Much respect to the both of you and thanks for easing my worries about a brown dwarf aproaching our beautiful planet...


Peace



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by star in a jar
 


On the contrary. One of the main purposes of the sky surveys was exactly that. To find "new" objects.

Both amateur and professional astronomers compare new images to the surveys to find objects which have appeared or moved since the original surveys were conducted.

For example a new supernova was confirmed in this manner:

Discovery of Supernova 2007od at Crni Vrh Observatory (Nov. 2, 2007)



We checked POSS2/UKSTU Red, POSS2/UKSTU Blue, POSS2/UKSTU IR, POSS1 Red and POSS1 Blue at STSCI archives but there was no trace of any object at this position. Confirming images of 2007od, obtained with the 60-cm Cichocki reflector on Nov. 3.713 reveal magnitudes R = 13.9 and B = 14.5.

www.observatorij.org...



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by Phage
The WWT program is different from the PIKA program, WWT is no tracking tool anyway but a generic research program for the public and since I don't think the contents of PIKA is publicly accessible, its out of my hands now.

Tracking a possible planet X with a publicly available program like WWT is like finding a needle in a picture of a haystack. It's just impossible, I realize it now.



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by OzWeatherman
 


Yea thats right brown dwarfs are invisible from the naked eye...

So we arnt getting superhero powers?



posted on Mar, 13 2009 @ 04:13 AM
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Originally posted by Iago18
I would, by no means, claim that the image that was found at the indicated position was that of Nibiru (in any of the possible iterations). However, it is an interesting astronomical feature that is not defined by the program.

Also, for the fact that Nibiru has been debunked in past "flybys" does not automatically discount the current theory. The fact that there are several major, or Grand, CTs unifying in the next few years, there is, for good reason, an uptick in Nibiru talk.

Frankly, there will be interesting things in the heavens, whether Nibiru is a comet or a whole brown dwarf solar system with a Dyson sphere, or if its just the 2012 alignment... its still very nifty stuff.

The thing that gets me is the systematic removal of Nibiru related searches and public information over the past month. That is the creepy part.



Lol a Dyson SPHERE to much STARTREK , lets hope in the next couple of years this Nibiru cr*p stops because lots of you guys are going to look complete idiots in 2013 but by then of course the date of DOOM will no doubt have been changed yet AGAIN!



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 05:16 AM
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The 2012 date is based on lots of end(restart) dates from many many cultures

* Hopi Predict a 25yr period of purification followed by End of Fourth World and beginning of the Fifth.
* Mayans Call it the 'end days' or the end of time as we know it.
* Maoris Say that as the veils dissolve there will be a merging of the physical & spiritual worlds.
* Zulu Believe that the whole world will be turned upside down.
* Hindus Kali Yuga (end time of man). The Coming of Kalki & critical mass of Enlightened Ones.
* Incas Call it the 'Age of Meeting Ourselves Again'.
* Aztec Call this the Time of the Sixth Sun. A time of transformation. Creation of new race.
* Dogon Say that the spaceship of the visitors, the Nommo, will return in the form of a blue star
* Pueblo Acknowledge it'll be the emergence into the Fifth World
* Cherokee Their ancient calendar ends exactly at 2012 as does the Mayan calendar.
* Tibetan Kalachakra teachings are prophesies left by Buddha predicting Coming of the Golden Age.
* Egypt According to the Great Pyramid (stone calendar), present time cycle ends in year 2012 AD


The whole planet X / Nibiru / Marduk is based soley on the book by Zacharia Sitchin. The planet/people that return Anually (note the ANU part, Annunaki).

The thing that gets overlooked is that the dwellers choose to let us know or not.

I am currently researching all 2012 events and retracing steps to find sources.



posted on May, 29 2009 @ 08:21 AM
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Found another Nibiru-possible photo
It`s third and placed between 2 old ones.
img40.imageshack.us...



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