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Russian general says U.S. may have planned satellite collision

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posted on Mar, 4 2009 @ 09:13 AM
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Russian general says U.S. may have planned satellite collision


en.rian.ru

03/03/2009 13:01 MOSCOW, March 3 (RIA Novosti) - A collision between U.S. and Russian satellites in early February may have been a test of new U.S. technology to intercept and destroy satellites rather than an accident, a Russian military expert has said.

According to official reports, one of 66 satellites owned by Iridium, a U.S. telecoms company, and the Russian Cosmos-2251 satellite, launched in 1993 and believed to be defunct, collided on February 10 about 800 kilometers (500 miles) above ...

(visit the link for the full news article)




[edit: clipped quoted content to 500 char. limit]

[edit on 5-3-2009 by 12m8keall2c]




posted on Mar, 4 2009 @ 09:13 AM
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When I learned of this DARPA program, I had wondered how they were going to test it.

I thought the Orbital Express was intended to 'service' US Satellites, and for that matter, anyone else's who was willing to pony up the dollars.

I can see some validility to the story, and I'm wondering how much of the truth has been buried.

en.rian.ru
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 4 2009 @ 09:32 AM
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I can't find the post, but another one of our ATSers had a thought about this. I guess Russia is thinking about this also. Hey and why not, the rusian satelite was defunked anyways. No harm, no foul right?



posted on Mar, 4 2009 @ 09:56 AM
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Well lets look at what Darpa says about the aims of the program :


According to the DARPA, the program was "to validate the technical feasibility of robotic, autonomous on-orbit refueling and reconfiguration of satellites to support a broad range of future U.S. national security and commercial space programs."


Well i think the sattelite managed the 'reconfiguration of sattelites' ( into space junk) just fine and as for the 'support of a broad range of future national security programs' it's pretty clear that it well supported it's target out of existence thus meeting the US national security aims which normally consists of destroying enemies and things in general. You just have to be familiar with intelligence doublespeak to see that this is all pretty obvious stuff.


Only half kidding btw.....

Stellar

[edit on 4-3-2009 by StellarX]



posted on Mar, 4 2009 @ 11:21 PM
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Here's the original DoD press release:

www.defenselink.mil...


"Iridium will not only add to our existing capability, it will provide a commercial alternative to our purely military systems. This may enable real civil/military dual use, keep us closer to the leading edge technologically, and provide a real alternative for the future," said Dave Oliver, principal deputy undersecretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics).



posted on Mar, 4 2009 @ 11:37 PM
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While I'd like to believe nobody would be reckless enough to create shrapnel debris in orbit (for the sake of the operation of other satellites), it is however incredibly unlikely that a satellite would alter course enough to collide with another in the manor in which these two did.

Vertical instability is a common issue with satellites, their orbits decay. But altering trajectory accidentally in a lateral movement isn't something that can be achieved without intervention, or say, a propulsion mishap.

It is my conclusion (which is mine, you can make your own mind up) that these two satellites were either brought together intentionally, or one of them produced or experienced lateral force unintentionally.

Either way, unless acted upon, it seems either of these satellites experiencing a decaying orbit would have brought them out of each others orbital altitude, and effectively, out of range of a collision.


But that's what I've walked away with, as I said, you can make your own minds up.



posted on Mar, 5 2009 @ 11:17 AM
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To me, it's looking more like they think we did do it:

www.nytimes.com...


MOSCOW (AP) -- Russia is working to develop anti-satellite weapons to match efforts by other nations, a deputy defense minister was quoted as saying Thursday.

Gen. Valentin Popovkin said Russia continues to oppose a space arms race but will respond to moves made by other countries, according to Russian news reports.

''We can't sit back and quietly watch others doing that, such work is being conducted in Russia,'' Popovkin was quoted as saying.
Russia already has some ''basic, key elements'' of such weapons, but refused to elaborate, Popovkin said.

Popovkin, who previously was the chief of Russian military Space Forces, reportedly made the statement at a news conference in response to a question about U.S. and Chinese tests of anti-satellite weapons.



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