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Mysteriouse Maths

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posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 01:00 AM
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Maths is a language that has helped us understand alot of things which we wouldn't understand using our more artistic language, that being said it should make any individual wonder how the hell did we come up with this sophisticated language that helps us see beyond, helps us see the things we cannot see, helps us hear things we cannot hear, so on and so forth. So I did alittle research, it is a shocker at least for me.


Mathematical genius has a habit of popping up spontaneously among people, as demonstrated by the many child prodigies and untutored but distinguished contributors in the known history of mathematics.



For instance, Blaise Pascal (1623 to 1662) is said to have re- invented much of Euclidian geometry as a child, and at sixteen he came up with “what is still the most important theorem of projective geometry”[3]. The mathematical giant Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777 to 1855) baffled his parents and schoolmasters with his precocious comprehension of numbers and found at the age of ten the formula for summing up a series[4]. The mostly self- taught genius Ramanujan (1887 to 1920) came up with several thousand theorems new to the mathematics of his time[5], and the “mathematician extraordinaire” Paul Erdös (1913 to 1996) discovered negative numbers on his own at the age of four[6].


Can anyone make sense to this? The Egyptians at least had an idea about it:


Numbers, to them, lived and acted in the same unseen world beyond ours that contained the gods and spirits, but unlike these, the numbers followed knowable laws. Numbers could therefore help those who studied them to come closer to whatever powers affected their lives from that invisible realm.

I stated previousely that if Internet becomes conscious it would be because of us, and undoubtedly it wouldn't be conscious if we were extracted from the equation. I am proposing the idea that Humans also are conscious because of another being which exists and if they are extracted from the equation, our consciousness would disappear. I am proposing that Maths maybe has something to do with these other creatures, as the Egyptians believed that Maths came from another realm.


a 30,000 year- old wolf bone found in Czechoslovakia has 55 notches cut into it. These form groups of five, and a notch of double length separates the first 25 from the others, in an arrangement that suggests some rudimentary understanding of multiplying and dividing by five[9].



On the ancient Egyptians’ own continent, but still more millennia before the nation- founding Narmer than we live after him, we have the 11,000 year old Ishango bone from the Congo region around Lake Edward. This famous bone is incised on its three edges with notches in groups of 11, 21, 19, 9; then 3, 6, gap, 4, 8, gap, 10, 5, 5, 7; and on the third edge 11, 13, 17, 19.

" as Dominic Olivastro explains in his book “Ancient Puzzles”[10], the first group looks like an experiment in addition and subtraction: 10+1, 20+1, 20-1, 10-1. The next one presents examples of doubling in the first two pairs of the next column, and of halving in the third one. Then comes a series of primes: five and seven fill the end of this line, and the next four entries on the next edge complete the correct sequence of all primes between four and 20. "

I am confusing myself I think, but confusion is good because it forces you to do more research. And when I do so I will post my findings.




posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 01:56 AM
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Interesting thoughts.

I think more about math than I used to. A couple of thoughts. There are two kinds of infinity. The infinity of the very large and the infinity of the very small. Curiously there are two kinds of zeros as well. The zero that lies halfway between the infinity of the very large and the infinity of the very small and the zero that is the limit to which the infinity of the very small tends.

Math is interesting and maybe less rational than people think it is.



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 02:15 AM
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Thanks for the star above. As I read my post again I thought that "infinity" is almost like a conceptual mobius strip that encompasses all of mathematics. It has to be the most flexible value in all of mathematics because you can almost fit it in almost anywhere.

I had to edit that last sentence above. The two infinities are tantalizing and slippery notions.

[edit on 3-3-2009 by ipsedixit]



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 02:16 AM
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If any prodigal children exist in this modern world, they would be ridiculed and torn to pieces by modern name calling and the other childish antics and insults typically found in the school society.

Nerd, Geek, Smartypants, Freak, Teacher's Pet, Homeschooled Freak

I think the child would ultimately supress his ability and choose to conform and have an enjoyable childhood in the schoolyard rather than focus on his mathmatical talents.

Way back then, these great mathematicians were heralded and respected. Nowadays the masses respect and follow Actors, Actresses...Musicians.

It is likely that humans are still being born with these natural mathematical abilities but they are just not being found or coming out as easily as they would have back then.

As for the origin of Math....our fingers have always been there for us to count on as long as cells have been around to divide into two



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 02:29 AM
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Originally posted by Nick_X
If any prodigal children exist in this modern world, they would be ridiculed and torn to pieces by modern name calling and the other childish antics and insults typically found in the school society.

Nerd, Geek, Smartypants, Freak, Teacher's Pet, Homeschooled Freak

I think the child would ultimately supress his ability and choose to conform and have an enjoyable childhood in the schoolyard rather than focus on his mathmatical talents.

Way back then, these great mathematicians were heralded and respected. Nowadays the masses respect and follow Actors, Actresses...Musicians.

It is likely that humans are still being born with these natural mathematical abilities but they are just not being found or coming out as easily as they would have back then.

As for the origin of Math....our fingers have always been there for us to count on as long as cells have been around to divide into two

Very true, that is basically todays social issues. How many humans in this Earth? and growing yet not many of them have been glorified the way they should be. I am sure you would recognize the name Britney Spears, what a shame that is don't you think, but for the sake of socializing we do things that...

As for the origin of Math... I still don't believe our fingers had much to do with it, how does a 4 year old understand negativity?



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 02:29 AM
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reply to post by Nick_X
 

I think that some of what you are talking about has it's origins in economic disparity. There is tremendous pressure to conform nowadays. The salvation of humanity and talented children lies in non-conformity and in the wealthiest segments of the society being satisfied with taking a little less than they do off the table.

Bertrand Russell wrote once that "Most people would rather die than think and most do." But thinking and conceptualizing is fun, especially when those thoughts and concepts can be brought into the world in ways that everyone can enjoy. The world needs great masters in the art of education.



[edit on 3-3-2009 by ipsedixit]



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 02:39 AM
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Originally posted by ipsedixit
Thanks for the star above. As I read my post again I thought that "infinity" is almost like a conceptual mobius strip that encompasses all of mathematics. It has to be the most flexible value in all of mathematics because you can fit it in anywhere.

Ifinity is a very interesting subject to discuss, for example at the beginning of the Universe, the dot was infinitely small and infinitely dense. So infinity can't only be applied to space but also to other things such as weight and so on and so forth. Since infinity is so flixable it makes the impossible possible which is one of the great achievements of Maths. Who could have believe in 2015 we will produce computerized lenses in our eyes. "Hi virtual reality", 'Hi', "meet reality".



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 02:56 AM
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i would guess a 4 year olds understands negativity when you take their sweets off them pretty well lol.



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 03:42 AM
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Originally posted by Ownification


On the ancient Egyptians’ own continent, but still more millennia before the nation- founding Narmer than we live after him, we have the 11,000 year old Ishango bone from the Congo region around Lake Edward. This famous bone is incised on its three edges with notches in groups of 11, 21, 19, 9; then 3, 6, gap, 4, 8, gap, 10, 5, 5, 7; and on the third edge 11, 13, 17, 19.


" as Dominic Olivastro explains in his book “Ancient Puzzles”[10], the first group looks like an experiment in addition and subtraction: 10+1, 20+1, 20-1, 10-1. The next one presents examples of doubling in the first two pairs of the next column, and of halving in the third one. Then comes a series of primes: five and seven fill the end of this line, and the next four entries on the next edge complete the correct sequence of all primes between four and 20. "



It's also interesting how people interpret the numbers. To me they whole thing looks like a lesson in primes.

11, 21 although the both end in 1, the number 21 is devisable by 3 ( multiplied by 7).

19, 9 again, although the both end in 9, the 9 is devisable by 3 (multiplied by 3)

You could point out at this point that a prime multiplied by a prime is not a prime.

3, 6 again 2 (prime) multiplied by 3 (prime) = 6 (even).

4, 8, 2 multiplied by 2 equals 4 which multiplied by 2 equals 8, even numbers devisable by 2.

10, 5 divide by 2 in this case gives a prime.

At this point all numbers between 1 and 10 have been covered.

1,2,3,4 are very significant numbers when dealing with primes and therefore a given at this point.

[5] 6 [7] 8 9 10 [11] 12 [13] 14 15 16 [17] 18 [19] then goes on to show the next 10 numbers.

But maybe I’m just reading too much into it



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 02:59 PM
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Originally posted by spannera
i would guess a 4 year olds understands negativity when you take their sweets off them pretty well lol.

I guess you don't know the difference between literal negativity and mathmatic negativity. I didn't understand it until I was 14 years old, well that's just me.



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by northerngate
 


It does make you wonder, and that is the beuty of it. Maths is damn interesting when you think about it.



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 03:09 PM
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Infinity eh!

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm.......................................


well, I want to know this: if a fraction of 1 is a smaller number than 1, is a fraction of infinity less than, or equal to infrinity??????????????????......mmmmm


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