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Vegetarianism - Good or bad

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posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 


Vegans can take B12 suplements Veg1 its called, also algue has B12. We can get everything from plants to survive, there are lots already to prove this to date.. we do not need to eat meat to get all our nutriants.

Eating meat causes a barbaric society I believe, we as humans need to give meat up to allow us to become "ligher" beings and only digest "light" food, not dead flesh that holds the emotions of the animal.

Yuk.




posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 


I don't know if you are really concerned about Veg*n health or a witty Omni trying to find flaws in a no meat lifestyle?

I get B12 from my Soymilk, a one cup serving has 50% of the daily allowance and for an extra kick I also use Red Star nutritional yeast (also contains B12).



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 09:24 PM
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I was vegetarian for 3 years. I ate all the time and gained weight.

I discovered the blood type diet. I am type o and according to this diet I should eat meat. After about a year on the diet (with few exceptions) I went for a check-up with my physician. My HDL (good) cholesterol was 128, the highest my doctor had ever seen. They want it to be above 59. (It was slightly over that but not nearly that high). At that time I reviewed charts in physicians offices, thousands of charts and had seen maybe 5 people with an HDL cholesterol of 115. I eat about 6 eggs a week, meat and vegetables. Minimal wheat, corn, potatoes or condiments. Severely lactose intolerant, I use soy milk. My LDL (bad, should be under 100) cholesterol was 75. Before, it was about 117. All problems with my digestive system cleared up.

According to the blood type diet, blood type A is the only diet that can be vegetarians without experiencing a problem.

I don't believe in the FDA's idea that one diet regime fits all. Neither do I believe that with the blood type diet that there aren't variations in a person's tolerance for certain food. It is trial and error. Sticking closely for the blood type diet works for me.

It would be interesting to know what blood type is of the vegetarians on this sight that are doing well.





[edit on 2-3-2009 by liveandlearn]



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 09:20 AM
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reply to post by liveandlearn
 


I'm O- blood type and I've been either a vegetarian or vegan for 7(4 years vegan, 3 years vegetarian) years now and I'm the healthiest I've ever been in my life. So I'm not sure your blood type diet is based on anything accurate.

And B12 is not only found in animal products. Cyanocobalamin is used in many multi-vitamins and other products like soy milk for example. It is a source of B12 that our bodies can use just fine.

To those people here who say algae has vitamin B12, be careful. Don't use it as your primary source for B12. It may not be a usable form of B12 and will make it appear that you have a normal B12 level on most tests even if you are deficient. A B12 deficiency can be quite dangerous so be careful.



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 09:31 AM
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I haven't eaten any fish or meat for the last 17 years. I don't think 'ill ever eat it again, haven't missed it , for even 1 second.

I'm a lacto-vegetarian, which means i still eat eggs, milk and other dairy products. i just don't eat fish nor meat.

People with a certain bloodtype are better of not following a vegetarian diet.

for me it workes, but you won't find me promoting it, or trying to ruin poeple who eat a juicy steak, for me anyone can eat meat.

Although i know that 80% of the meat eaters would not have the stomach, nor the guts, to kill a cow and cut out their own steak out of it.... as long as it's nicly prepared and displayed on a plate, it's alright.



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 11:30 AM
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reply to post by XyZeR
 



Although i know that 80% of the meat eaters would not have the stomach, nor the guts, to kill a cow and cut out their own steak out of it.... as long as it's nicly prepared and displayed on a plate, it's alright.


I know i definitely couldnt do something like that and im sure barely any of us could aswell let alone eat what they have just done aswell.

and thats the annoying thing everything is soo neatly prepared it makes you less aware of EXACTLY what you are eatnig and how it got to where it did.



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by Anti - Government
 


This is exactly the point that most advocates of a carnivorous diet forget...most of us simply could not kill, let alone kill efficiently and painlessly. That's a really difficult, skilled thing to achieve, and the hypocrisy of eating what I can't kill myself is mostly what makes me vegetarian. People really need to understand this. It's not just about the little plastic trays in the supermarket...it's the whole animal production and slaughter process that is shameful. If people had to buy their meat from an abbatoir and see what goes on there, there would be many more vegetarians for sure, and animal welfare standards would be much higher if people had to witness it.



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 12:03 PM
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reply to post by Bosko
 


Glad you are doing so well on your diet. I do believe blood types have probably adjusted to diet variations over thousands of year.

Still it remains that more type O people are lactose intolerance and type A is a risk factor for colon cancer. What do they advise not to eat to prevent colon cancer? Red meat.



posted on Mar, 3 2009 @ 04:20 PM
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reply to post by XyZeR
 



Killing a cow is merely an extension of hunting, which is what humans have done for 1000s of years.

Lots of people seem to have no problem killing moose, deer, sheep, goats or even chickens for meat. If there were a dilemma was between being bullied by local bears or enjoying dinner for the whole winter, I think the choice is obvious.

There is scientific proof that plants know what's going on around them. Electrical activity on their leaves increases in response to other living beings either feeling fear or being killed. These findings only makes sense -- animals don't need eyes or ears in order to sense things intuitively.



posted on Mar, 4 2009 @ 04:18 AM
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Originally posted by vcwxvwligen
reply to post by XyZeR
 



Killing a cow is merely an extension of hunting, which is what humans have done for 1000s of years.


I'm sorry, but genetically engineering cows to produce as much a meat and milk as possible is not an extention of hunting, not at all, it's the opposite.
Hunting means you go hunt the food. What we do in the west, the industrialisation of raising cattle leads to repercussions by mother nature (mad cow desease, pork-plague, etc etc....) are clear indicators of this.

By the way, i wasn't attacking anyone, it was just an observation i made.
anyone can eat what they want imho.


There is scientific proof that plants know what's going on around them. Electrical activity on their leaves increases in response to other living beings either feeling fear or being killed. These findings only makes sense -- animals don't need eyes or ears in order to sense things intuitively.


Lol what's your point ? Are you trying to tell me plants live full lives with awareness ? That's ...amazing

See...As long as plants don't have brains to proces those "intiutive senses" they are not capable of "feeling senses", sorry !


There is scientific evidence, that cows are responsible for a great percentage of the Methane gas that is partualy responsible for global warming, so if everyone would eat less meat, it would help against global warming.

www.simplydumb.com...



posted on Mar, 11 2009 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by XyZeR
 



I'm not sure whether they are "gentically engineered" but quality cows are selectively breeded. Particularly greedy farmers feed their cows growth hormones and anti-biotics, because the growth hormones cause the udders to be more vulnerable to infection. I think that most people will agree that this is cruel, but that's not how every farmer raises his cows.

You are gravely mistaken. Learn the difference between the "brain" and the "mind."

Actually, no. Research how much methane gas exists in the atmosphere in proportion to other greenhouse gases.



[edit on 11-3-2009 by vcwxvwligen]



posted on Mar, 13 2009 @ 05:48 AM
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Originally posted by vcwxvwligen
reply to post by XyZeR
 



I'm not sure whether they are "gentically engineered" but quality cows are selectively breeded.


Here's a newsflash: Geneticaly engineered = selective breeding....:rolleye:


Particularly greedy farmers feed their cows growth hormones and anti-biotics, because the growth hormones cause the udders to be more vulnerable to infection. I think that most people will agree that this is cruel, but that's not how every farmer raises his cows.


That's how 99% of our meat is grown,... on an industrial scale....


You are gravely mistaken. Learn the difference between the "brain" and the "mind."


I'm sorry,....What ? How did you reach this assumption that i don't know the difference between those from what i posted...?...What am i gravely mistaken about?


Actually, no. Research how much methane gas exists in the atmosphere in proportion to other greenhouse gases.


First, is that an attempt at forming a complete sentance, have you read it yourself ?

Are you trying to say no such research exsists ? cause i posted a link about it for ya, which you clearly didn't check.

Or are you telling me cows don't produce methane on a massive scale ?


Cows emit a massive amount of methane through belching, with a lesser amount through flatulence. Statistics vary regarding how much methane the average dairy cow expels. Some experts say 100 liters to 200 liters a day (or about 26 gallons to about 53 gallons), while others say it's up to 500 liters (about 132 gallons) a day. In any case, that's a lot of methane, an amount comparable to the pollution produced by a car in a day.


source= check it



posted on Mar, 13 2009 @ 06:08 AM
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Im a meat eater,but i stopped buying processed/mass produced meat where they treat animals like dirt.I love my meat,could never give up my meat thats why i only buy the good stuff these days and its not that expensive if you know where to look.Haven't noticed a difference in my health though,but im still young..might pay off in the future.I'd say to all people that like there meat to do this.Im looking forward to the day this is used news.bbc.co.uk... seems weird at first but i wouldn't have any problem with it if it was safe and healthy.

Oh and i have no problem with vegetarians,just the ones with smug attitudes that use false information to promote their agenda.

[edit on 13-3-2009 by Solomons]



posted on Mar, 13 2009 @ 06:17 AM
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I became a vegetarian during my trip to India, where I got to know the teachings of the Bhagavad Gita and especially the Veden. The teachings include how to live a healthy life for body and soul. I used to eat meat a lot, nearly everyday, and I thought I was feeling good... well I got to know better, since I stopped eating animals, I'm feeling way better and I'm more happy and focused. Also my spirituality has changed from that point on, and expanded. Well, I don't regret taking that step in any way...

[edit on 13-3-2009 by Clairaudience]



posted on Mar, 13 2009 @ 07:40 AM
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Pro's:
1) Better for the enviroment
2) Healthier
3) Cheaper!
4) Ethics apply
5) Shopping much easier (limited selection)
6) Awareness of nuitrition facts
7) Rising interest in growing own crops
8) New inspiration in the kitchen
9) Spiritual enrichment (if into such)

Con's
1) Total vegan life style might weaken one's physical attributes
2) Time taken to contemplate shopping/cooking might increase
3) Friends might laugh at you...
4) No more classic BBQ-parties
5) There are more landmass suited for cattle than for crops
6) Ratio of nuitrition/mass is lower in most vegetables
7) Hard to let go of the holy matrimony between meat and beer
8) The hobby of hunting might lose some of its points
9) A lot of candy must be let gone of (gelatin)

So, I guess it is up to each an every one of us to decide what is more important.

I am lacto-ovo vegetarian and have been so for a year now and I feel great.
I turned to this path for some reason I am yet not fully aware of. I had been thinking of it for some time, but suddenly it just came over me. It was like a message in my head, indestinct yet very obvious. Maybe I will know later. Maybe it bought me a few more years of life time for me to do something special. Anyways, I don't interfere with my gut-feelings anymore.
Besides, it saves me so much money!

I try to avoid fish most of the time, but I don't cosider fish to be in the same "chapter" as regular meat (birds included). Eggs are OK, they are not alive, never has been, never will be. Dairy- couldn't do without it, I'm sorry...guess the Gods have to cut me some slack...I am doing my best here.

I really try not to preach my diet, but I will if anyone is weak-minded enough to question it. It is very easy to start a heated debate over this subject. I think it is so sore to many people because they have supressed feelings of guilt over their meat-eating. Visit a industrial slaughter house and see how it feels afterwards...

Sometimes I get the cravings for meat, but as soon as I have it in front of me I just get overwhelmed with emotion over how "wrong" it feels.
My point is: if it is possible to live without eating meat, then why should we not do so?
The hard part is the candy! Man, I love marsmallows...but no more of that stuff...

I say that man is an omnivour if it must be. But normally, we are designed to be herbavoures.



posted on Mar, 13 2009 @ 01:33 PM
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I became Vegetarian in 1981 and a dietary Vegan in 1998.

As part of an investigation by a medical neuroscience department into a neurological condition, I had extensive medical tests over a four week period, and this included a session with a State Registered Nutritionalist. It was confirmed that my diet was very good, and that the condition was not related to nutrition.

I changed my diet because meat and derivatives gave me gut ache, and I grew out of eating pieces of dead creature. Eventually I had to quit eating eggs and dairy products too, as they were upsetting my digestive system. That lead to a lot of reading, and I had no choice but to become a dietary Vegan.

I’ve never tried persuading anyone else to stop eating animal stuff, but there’s things to realise about a meat, dairy, egg and fish diet. People in Africa, China, India and South America see the Western Diet as a target worth achieving alongside economic growth, and that is going to make meat in particular more expensive, and less easy to obtain. Seas are being overfished, due to the increasing global population.

Growing plant based food for the Global population is much greener than growing animal feed and then converting it to animal foodstuffs. Also bio fuel crops are taking up field space from human food production, and this green fuel isn’t as green as it first appears.

There are many children being born who just will not eat meat, and mealtimes can become a domestic battlefield. Some give in temporarily, only to revert when they are old enough to break away from their parental home.

It is also interesting to note that menopausal symptoms are virtually unknown in Japan, where the population consume soya based foods like bean curd. Some Western women going through the menopause have added soya to their diet, bringing reductions to their normal range of symptoms.

With most Vegetarians and Vegans, there isn’t the need to run ‘Five-A-Day’, campaigns to get them to eat sufficient healthy fruit & veg portions per day, because they normally get more than that.

Personally I wouldn’t want to go back to eating dead animal parts, it seem quite prehistoric and barbaric, but live and let live, I say. (Oops, no pun intended).



posted on Mar, 13 2009 @ 01:38 PM
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The diet is not for everyone, but it works for me. It has kept me healthy, and at a good weight all my life. I think as long as you include a lot of raw veggies and fruits into your diet, regardless if you're vegetarian or not, it will help immensely.



posted on Mar, 13 2009 @ 02:12 PM
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The one thing that is definite is that the bell will toll for me. I am going to enjoy eating all kinds of food, and would rather have a few months shaved off my life than be a bored vegan. I love greasy bacon cheeseburgers, and fries to go with that.

The bell will toll for me whether or not I am a vegan. I say, enjoy life as the bell will toll for you also.



posted on Mar, 14 2009 @ 04:56 AM
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reply to post by kidflash2008
 


Seems you are not much worried about the afterlife?


Don't you think, for one moment, that death is the end...moahahahaaa...

Besided, your argument doesn't hold!

1) This is not only your planet, and as vegetarianism is also about preserving the Earth and its scarce resources, being a meat-eater is kind of selfish really (besides the fact that other mammals and such need to give way for your pleasures)

2) No one said you have to be "a bored vegan". You can stay lacto-vegetarian at least. And it has nothing at all to do with boredom- this is one of the least valid excues: quite on the contrary you will see an entierly new universe open up for you. The Lebanese and the Indian kitchen are experts on vegetarian cooking, stuff that actually taste something!
3) You are what you eat. Greasy burgers for greasy people!


I can go on forever, but I don't know if this is the right thread to start ranting...

Peas out!



posted on Mar, 14 2009 @ 05:17 AM
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If you are interested here is a Dr. Fuhrman FAQ on your questions, he is the author of Eat for Health (was Eat to Live).

What You Need to Know About Vegetarian or Vegan Diets




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