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U.S. rattled as Mexico drug war bleeds over border

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posted on Mar, 5 2009 @ 09:32 AM
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If Violence Escalates in Mexico, Texas Officials Plan to Be Ready
As drug cartels continue to terrorize Mexico, Texas officials are planning for the worst-case scenario: how to respond if the violence spills over the border, and what to do if thousands of Mexicans seek refuge in the United States.




posted on Mar, 5 2009 @ 09:08 PM
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Originally posted by Spectre0o0
you guys don't get it. if the federal gov sits back until its really bad,they will make a deal to send troops into mexico"to calm things down."
once we have a prearranged deal and the troops are in,they will propose a north american union,since bush already signed our borders away.

THEY SAID WE WOULD ASK FOR IT,AND THEY WOULDN'T HAVE TO FORCE IT ON US.

this is why there is no response from the federales. hell,they're probably running this show.
create a problem,and offer a solution

they get:
gun control
money from selling arms to the mexicans
american union
change economy to ameros
create a permanent base in mexico
control the flow of goods into the US
and they're probably,as in the past,supplying the drugs
AH! forgot one
they make money from contractors who house prisoners
just by waiting.

[edit on 2-3-2009 by Spectre0o0]


Hmmmm....methinks thou art a prophet!



posted on Mar, 5 2009 @ 09:17 PM
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reply to post by AntiNWO
 

In fact, take a look at this new news item. It is already happening:
www.google.com...

US military chief to offer help to Mexico in violent drug war

WASHINGTON (AFP) — America's top military officer heads to Mexico this week to offer help to a government battling powerful drug cartels, amid alarm in Washington over escalating violence across the border. With the death toll at 5,300 last year and Mexican cartels armed with automatic weapons and billions in cash, the crisis has become a full-blown national security concern for the United States. Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was due in Mexico later this week as the United States signalled it was ready to step up military and other assistance to tackle the heavily armed drug rings ravaging the country's north. "The cartels are retaliating," Defense Secretary Robert Gates told NBC on Sunday. "It clearly is a serious problem." But he said Mexico has dropped its traditional reluctance to cultivate ties with the US military. "I think we are beginning to be in a position to help the Mexicans more than we have in the past," Gates said. "Some of the old biases against cooperation between our militaries and so on, I think, are being satisfied." The United States started sharing intelligence with Mexico in November and under a new program plans to provide helicopters, maritime surveillance aircraft and other equipment, Pentagon spokesman Commander Jeffrey Gordon said.



posted on Mar, 5 2009 @ 09:29 PM
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Originally posted by nikiano

Originally posted by spark00
The mexican cartels have all the stimulas money.
check this out
Mexico's Stimulas Money




You know, I have to laugh at that, because today, I came up with "another conspiracy theory" today about what happened with the TARP money, and this is almost exactly what I came up with.

I asked myself: Isn't it interesting that we can't find 2+ trillion dollars that went bye-bye in the first bailout. And isn't it interesting that it seems to be that our government seems to be waiting for......something major to happen before they do anything about the violence in Mexico.

And then I put those two thoughts together and said: What if the 2+trillion dollars are being held in a secret account, to be used to basically buy up Mexico when the time is right? We come up with an excuse to invade, use the money to grease the palms of the corrupt politicians and the drug cartels who are now in control of Mexico, and viola.....the way is paved for the takeover of Mexico.


I think you may be onto something here, however allow me to present a slightly different angle... What if the money just went to the drug cartels. Imagine the weapons they could buy with that - not just guns, but RPGs, stingers, tanks, body armor, etc.

Now imagine this scenario: The cartels get so powerful as to topple the Mexican government. Now they want to set up (more) bases of operations in the U.S., so violence spills over the border with such force as to overwhelm police, Border Patrol, and the feds. Now Americans are being raped, robbed, kidnapped, tortured, and killed by the thousands every day in the border states....

The people start begging the government for protection - the perfect time to invoke martial law, confiscate weapons from Americans, go to war with Mexico, and take it over and execute the final stages of the North American Union.



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 02:12 PM
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Lets see.
The mass of armaments is coming from the US.
The Market these drug cartels are killing for is in the US.

We need to deal with our supply and demand issues here in the states - First and Foremost. Prosecute to the fullest extent of the law, those that are fueling the cartel wars and benefiting or profiting from it. When we start to choke off those enabling elements, we are closer to a resolution.

There is no way the Mexican government will ever put an end to this - ever.
One would have to have lived under a rock for the past 50 years not to know that their government is as corrupt as a government could get. The only way to stop this from spreading is to come down hard on the perpetrators here in the US first.



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by AntiNWO
Now imagine this scenario: The cartels get so powerful as to topple the Mexican government. Now they want to set up (more) bases of operations in the U.S., so violence spills over the border with such force as to overwhelm police, Border Patrol, and the feds. Now Americans are being raped, robbed, kidnapped, tortured, and killed by the thousands every day in the border states....

The people start begging the government for protection - the perfect time to invoke martial law, confiscate weapons from Americans, go to war with Mexico, and take it over and execute the final stages of the North American Union.


I realize much government paranoia is justified, but holy cats. I honestly do not believe that the government and military are intending to arrange for America to be invaded, its people "raped, robbed, kidnapped, tortured, and killed by the thousands every day" all so they can impose martial law. For goddsakes, talk about having one belief system and forcing every imaginable situation to fit into it!

PJ



posted on Mar, 6 2009 @ 10:05 PM
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That's what happens to people who don't pay their bills in Mexico.



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 01:21 AM
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Originally posted by ZenaV
That's what happens to people who don't pay their bills in Mexico.


What happens to them? What bills? Credit card and utilities?

second _____



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 04:51 AM
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In this time of the credit-crunch etc, it might be a bad time but, erect an electrified fence (200,000 volts) with a 100ft ditch either side of it, sound sensitive electronics, mines, volunteer armed patrols and shoot the mother*******


Have a nice day y`all.



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 11:24 AM
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The U.S. Military is preparing to get involved.

Looks like we'll treat Mexico like Pakistan; use the terrorist angle, view the cartels like Taliban, employ drones, absorb some collateral damage, and make sure the public perceives limited military cooperation.

www.foxnews.com...

Top U.S. Military Leader Offers Help to Mexico
The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said the United States could help with equipment and intelligence techniques after returning from a six-day trip to Latin America punctuated by news of beheadings and intimidation by Mexican drug cartels.

AP
Saturday, March 07, 2009

...
Adm. Mike Mullen would not be specific about what kind of intelligence or surveillance help the United States might offer, but said he saw ways to employ experience the United States has gained in the ongoing hunt for extremists and terrorists.

He would not say whether there may already be U.S. drones flying over bloodstained cities such as Ciudad Juarez, where 17 bodies came into the morgue on one day recently, including the city police force's second-in-command and three other officers.

"Obviously it affects us because of the relationship between the two countries," Mullen said during a telephone news conference as he flew to Washington following meetings in Mexico, his last stop.

...

There are signs the violent competition among Mexican drug and smuggling cartels is spilling across the border, as cities in Arizona report increases in such crimes as home invasions. More than 700 people were arrested as part of a wide-ranging crackdown on Mexican drug cartels operating inside the United States, the Justice Department said last month.

Last weekend, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said he also saw opportunities for the U.S. military to help with military training, resources and intelligence.

"I think we are beginning to be in a position to help the Mexicans more than we have in the past. Some of the old biases against cooperation with our -- between our militaries and so on, I think, are being set aside," Gates said in an interview that aired last Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"It clearly is a serious problem," he said.



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by David9176
 


The concern isn't that Mexico will try to retake Texas. They don't have the inclination to do that, nor could they muster the resources. The main concern for the US is that the Mexican government will fail, leaving the country to fall into lawlessness or civil war. These drug interests are enormously wealthy and poweful; more so than the Mexican government. The drug people are not bound by laws or accountability. The only good news is that there are several warring families, which weaken their ability to make a concerted attack against the Mexican government. If they ever unify, then that government will likely fall almost immediately.

Without a central Mexican government, the task of guarding our southern border will fall entirely onto the US. At the moment, despite appearances, Mexico does contribute to blocking some of the flow of people and drugs (and weapons) into the US. Without them, we'll have to do it all ourselves. Considering how poorly we've done even with assistance, I cannot expect an improvement if we lose that assistance.

Even worse, if this government falls, whatever replaces it has a good likelihood of being indifferent or hostile to US interests. Considering how we treat Mexicans as criminals, this should come as no surprise. Having a hostile enemy on our borders would be a serious problem, requiring much stronger protection than we now have in place. Someone correctly commented that given our wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, we are in a poor position to use scarce resources protecting our own borders - but this wouldn't be something we could just ignore or defer. Borders would take priority over a war in some God-foresaken desert we never heard of until 9/11. Either we'd withdraw from Afghanistan, or we'd be fighting on three fronts and would need to bolster our military through conscription.

One possible way out seems, to me, to stop making drugs so profitable. Interdiction hasn't worked. Possibly stopping the interdiction and (say) taxing the hell out of them might take the heart out of the drug interests. Prices of drugs would fall, and profits for illegal interests would vanish. Resources now being used to enforce insane, ineffective, and arbitrary drug laws could be rechanneled into education and treatment of addicts. Some 40% of our prison population could be released, easing that burden and saving enormous amounts of money.

Our "War on Drugs" hasn't done a thing to stem the flow of them - quite the opposite. By making drugs enormously profitable, we've indirectly funded these violent drug families. We did much the same thing during our Prohibition era, when we tried to block the sale of alcohol. Al Capone would never have had a chance, but for Prohibition.



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 08:00 AM
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Originally posted by Seekingmyself
This is quite worriesome. Should I be cancelling my spring break in Cancun?!


I would. Because of all the lawless over there. Kidnapping are frequent. In Juarez thousands of young women go missing(women of juarez). They turn up weeks or months later dead, tortured and raped. Right now things are hellish over there, cartel hitmen and dead cops turn up with there heads chopped off. If something was to happen to a US citizen over there, I doubt there be anything you could do about it. I would think skipping any vacation plans over there til things calm down.



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 10:54 AM
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Originally posted by chiron613
reply to post by David9176
 


One possible way out seems, to me, to stop making drugs so profitable. Interdiction hasn't worked. Possibly stopping the interdiction and (say) taxing the hell out of them might take the heart out of the drug interests. Prices of drugs would fall, and profits for illegal interests would vanish. Resources now being used to enforce insane, ineffective, and arbitrary drug laws could be rechanneled into education and treatment of addicts. Some 40% of our prison population could be released, easing that burden and saving enormous amounts of money.



As being a former user and abuser, I'd like to agree and disagree with your statement.
The mark up from the manufacturer to the street price is enormous. The Cartels profit margin takes in account the shipping cost, bribes and confiscation cost. Leagalizing and taxation would not hamper their profit margin. As a result there would be more product readily avalible at a lower cost to the user. The taxation would fall also on the user. The pharmacy companies would price accordingly to demand. The resources now spent on the "war", yes, could be better spent on the education and rehabilitation of drugs.
The "40%" of our prision population is abit far fetched. Yes there are quite a few prisoners solely on posession charges but the majority also have other charges stemming from their posession charges.
As far as a solution? I don't have one. The wanting to place oneself in an altered state of mind has been around since history began.



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 11:23 AM
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What annoys me most about this sort of thing is that the US have the best funded (sorry over funded) intelligence service in the entire freakin world, and yet they cant stop a bunch of degenerate druggies from messing up all over the border??? I have a few ideas in this regard. How about putting a minefield all over that border? How about gun emplacements and missile launchers being deployed. EVEN BETTER IDEA !!! Get the smelly corperate warmachine out of Afghanistan and put it where it needs to be... AT THE POINT YOU ARE ACTUALY BEING INVADED FROM !!!



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 11:56 AM
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Originally posted by Impreza
Wtf is this ****?! What is the government waiting for when it has come to the point where our people are being taken from homes and shopping malls? This is outrageous! ****ing Texas could take care of this whole mess alone if the Fed would just get the hell out of the way, so what gives?!


I fear that is why we are being desensitized to the FEMA camps by the MSM. They want us to start demanding a resolution from the government so they can put jack boots in the streets and haul people off to the camps.

It may start with drug dealers and illegals but the next step will be the American citizen.

Some states are already crying broke and complaining that their legal system is bursting at the seams; so they will have no choice but to put the American citizen “suspected” of committing a crime right in the cell along side the others.

Remember in the camp you have no rights, you don’t get a telephone call and you don’t have the privilege of an attorney until they official charge you with something and there is time frame for when they have to do that.

If they don’t get around to case for twenty years you are just stuck.

I think we have to very careful about what we ask for and give close scrutiny to any actions concerning the camps.

If those camps are allowed to go into operation the next time a loved one is more then thirty minutes late you had better start checking the camps and pray they will tell you the truth.



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 05:44 PM
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Hey everyone, here's a radical idea: Let's just say "no" to drugs and not provide a profitable market for weed, pills, heroin, etc. blah, blah, blah.

Starting tomorrow, all drugs will not longer have any value!

Le't watch Mexico go broke!

Ya think????

Hold on I've got more to say but I need some more chocolate chip cookies. Hey, dude,...pass that joint over here...



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 10:54 PM
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Mexico is so corrupt it is pretty dangerous. I think there are areas that are less so; for example, as a tourist, I'd much rather go to Playa del Carmen than to Tijuana (doh) for safety reasons as well as environment reasons. My father went to get married there once. He took 10x as much money as he thought he could possibly need, but by the time he'd bribed about 11 different people to let it happen (and two police officers that 'invented' driving crimes against him but were happy for a few bills in exchange) he was broke. My aunt went there once on vacation and was shopping, and while standing on the sidewalk (!) a taxi hit her. She nearly dived got out of the way but it caught her ankle and foot. The hospital and surgeons were such a nightmare that in the end, her husband and many of his friends had to bribe everybody in and out of sight and then kidnap and steal her from the hospital and back over the border, so she could go to an American hospital--without which she probably wouldn't have walked on (or kept) that foot again. On the other hand, a couple coworkers went to Playa del Carmen (southern tip of Mexico) and said it was glorious.

PJ



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 04:59 AM
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If the borders where adequately manned this wouldnt be a problem. Of course that would require the US accepting that defense can only happen on the door step of your nation, not miles away in a dustbowl most of the citezens never knew existed.
If the US bought all thier troops home, and deployed them on the mexican border, then there wouldnt be a problem. I dont care how rich and powerful the cartels get, theres no way they would keep raiding across the border, if no matter where they tried to cross, there where fifty well trained , fully kitted out men with assault rifles, backed up by a pair of tanks and emplaced weapons. I mean I know the cartels are big, but they arent hard enough to take that .




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