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U.S. Rattled as Mexico Drug War Bleeds Over Border

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posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by jdub297
 


What's the difference between the gangs we have here and the gangs they have over there?

Murder is murder no matter how gruesome or violent it is. Yet I don't see Americans forming a posse to take our gangs on. Many of American streets are owned by gangs.

Another question.

How many gang members do you think are causing all of this trouble in Mexico?

I personally am not buying into what the government is selling. I honestly feel something is going on behind the scenes and somebody is pulling strings.




posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 11:19 PM
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reply to post by jam321
 
I don't believe American gangs are be.ing police and politicians and rolling their .s into nightclubs, or burning bodies in mass graves.
I've not heard of any American police departments being supplanted by gangs, or of police chiefs forced to resign because of the murders of their subordinates and families.

I've yet to read of protracted shootouts between American gangs and police in which the police were outgunned and had to beg nieghboring countries for additional arms and backup.

Nuevo Laredo, alone has seen 2 police chiefs and numerous officers shot down in the streets. Ciudad Juarez police patrol only in pairs and with guns drawn at all times.

These are all happening in Mexico as we "speak."

At least three International Bridges have been closed from the Mexican sides by protesters threatened or paid by cartels and gangs.

The "ZETAs" have come into the U.S. to kidnap and murder Amercian civilians and law enforcement.

Several were tried over the past few years and convicted in American courts, but there are thousands more beyonf our reach.

ZETAs were originally trained and armed to be Mexican Special Forces by American advisers, but were bought off by cartels.

This has been going on for years.


No word that Bllods, Crips, M-13 or other "American" gangs have done any of this that I know of, although several cliques are known to be tied to foreign-based gangs.

We are bieng invaded.

jw



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 11:40 PM
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reply to post by jdub297
 



We are bieng invaded.


That is your opinion and I respect it. I don't believe we are. I believe we are being lied to so the US will stop the immigration issue.

First of all, we don't know if those that were gruesomely killed were part of the business and were put out because they might talk. We really don't know why they are choosing these tactics. The one thing I do know is that 5 or 6 gangs are fighting for the top spot.

Second, I don't see these drug cartels killing the hand that feeds it. If the US didn't have such a dependency problem these drug cartels would have to find a different line of business or take their product elsewhere.

How can Mexico go from almost legalizing to war on drugs in a year?

Somebody played a hand in this decision IMO.



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 12:32 AM
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Originally posted by jam321
I believe we are being lied to so the US will stop the immigration issue.

First of all, we don't know if those that were gruesomely killed were part of the business and were put out because they might talk. We really don't know why they are choosing these tactics.

Second, I don't see these drug cartels killing the hand that feeds it.

How can Mexico go from almost legalizing to war on drugs in a year?


1. You don't have to rely on U.S. press reports. Go to foreign sources and see what they report. Lies will not "stop the immigration issue." This is not about immigrants.

2. The drug cartels aren't "killing the hand that feeds it." They are killing police and business kidnappees. When they pin messages on the dead as warnings, the are pushing against limits imposed by U.S. and Mexican authorities.

3. The Mexican President campaigned on an anti-drug and anti-corruption platform. They have never "almost legalized."

When members of a foreign military enter the U.S., that is an invasion. You don't need the press or gov't. for that. Ask the grocers and store owners in Pharr, Harlingen and other Texas border cities. I've been there and done that. Federal Soldiers have driven miles into Texas to buy supplies they can't get in Mexico. Corrupt Federales have fired on Americans across the border. Ask border law enforcement.

When ZETA members are captured and tried in Texas, they testify to the truth because they know they will be executed if returned to Mexico. Life in an American prison appears to be more desirable than torture in Mexico.

jw



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 12:40 AM
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Why are there two identical threads going on this same issue?

Just curious.

Cheers!!!!



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 12:48 AM
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reply to post by RFBurns
 
I posted this one at 1 on political news, David posted at 7 under Brkg Alt News.
jw



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by jdub297
 


I see...now both are in breaking news forum. No worries just unusual to see two identical threads going in the same forum about the same thing.

On topic tho...are any of you aware of how often the Mexican drug cartels easily prance back and forth across that southern border on a daily basis?

Are any of you aware that they have set up shop in just about every border town in Texas and New Mexico and Arizona and California?

Also, are any of you aware that in those towns and cities, the murder rates related to 'gang activity' is quite high?

Point here folks is that the Mexico drug war has bled over the border quite a number of years ago and it is only getting noticed now because these drug cartels are spreading upward byond the heartland regions and making their way into both north east and north west.

Im not a racist but let me give you an example of what I mean.

I moved to central Wyoming back in Feb 2007. When I arrived here, there were very few Mexican nationals. Over the past year, the numbers have increased exponentially. Now considering Wyoming is not an isolated state when it comes to the flaky economic situation of the entire country, why would there be an increase in the Mexican nationals with fancy cars and trucks yet the unemployment is considerable?

Drug runners and drug organizers is the only thing I can come up with as to how these people seem to be quite well off when everyone else who has lived here their entire lives are loosing their homes and jobs just as the rest of the country is.

Fact is that the strength of this nation's backbone is so weak that it may just be that easy for it to be overun.

The border issues need to be resolved now. IMO, they need to be closed for a time until certian issues are resolved and this country's internal strength is increased.

Otherwise we will be hearing of reports of this drug war starting to bring harm onto American citizens in their own front yards.


Cheers!!!!



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by RFBurns
 
For years when I was growing up, wealthy Mexicans would travel to central Texas to shop. When I started out in business, they were buying land as well.

Today, most border cities depend on Mexican cash and property taxes. There are mansions in what is otherwise scrub brush and desert.

The rich now include smugglers and cartel lieutenants and they are buying like crazy while the market is down.

I've got a 20-acre game ranch outside of San Antonio that several different Realtors want to market to Mexican investors who don't need a mortgage, they have cash to burn.

As you've seen, they are looking everywhere now, not just in border states.

As far as "doing business" in the states, I can only speak for parts of Texas. What I see and hear is that they are content to trans-ship from here, but don't sell.

They do enforce across the border and there are frequent kidnappings along the border.

Laredo, Eagle Pass, Del Rio and the Rio Grande Valley used to be nice places to cross to shop, but most people no longer go across there anymore. Many of these cities are dying. Local law enforcement are over-taxed and under-manned.

Places like McAllen-Pharr-Weslaco and Harlingen have exploded with high-dollar stores and real estate developments as a result of Mexican investment and consumers. That money comes from the interior.


jw



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 01:35 PM
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3. The Mexican President campaigned on an anti-drug and anti-corruption platform. They have never "almost legalized."



MEXICO CITY — Heeding an outcry of criticism, President Vicente Fox retreated Wednesday from supporting a proposed law that would have allowed small amounts of drug use in Mexico without criminal penalties.

Fox's office said he was sending the legislation back to Congress so it could make "necessary corrections to be absolutely clear that in our country the possession and consumption of drugs is and will continue being crimes."

The sudden move, a day after Fox's spokesman said he would sign the bill, follows expressions of alarm from U.S. officials, Mexican church leaders and others that the proposed law could promote more drug use and drug dealing. Some said it might set a bad example of decriminalization.


seattletimes.nwsource.com...


MEXICO CITY - The United States reacted cautiously on Saturday to a Mexican measure that would make it legal to carry small amounts of coc aine, heroin and other drugs for personal use.

News of the decriminalization did not make the front pages of any major Mexico City newspaper, nor was it discussed in editorials. It was slightly better publicized in the north of the country, where turf wars between rival drugs gangs have caused hundreds of killings along the Mexico-U.S. border, but was still overshadowed by news about immigration.

President Vicente Fox has yet to sign the bill, which would eliminate penalties for those caught with small amounts of some drugs, but his office has applauded it.


www.msnbc.msn.com...

Seems like an almost IMO.

One has to question why the US helped changed their mind?



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by jam321
 

Not even close. One thing you learn from living near and among Mexicans, and travelling in Mexico, is that nothing in the press (or left out) is to be believed until confirmed.

Fox's aides and other "officials" hailed the legislation believing Fox would turn his back on U.S. $$, or that we would look the other way.

It was never about to happen so long as Fox's hand was in Uncle Sam's pocket. He left office to exile after looting the treasury of U.S. funds in the billions of dollars.


jw



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