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SAS survival guide GET IT

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posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 06:05 AM
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People shouldn't "need" a survival guide. Isn't it all more or less common sense? If you need a book to survive...., then don't. That's Darwinism in action......




posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 10:12 AM
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reply to post by Zenagain
 


That's like saying Math is common sense so why bother using textbooks to learn. Or forget a cookbook and use common sense making a soufle. Come on, Zenagain.

Do you think every person knows the ins-and-outs of surviving in the wilderness? People who were raised in big cities with no outdoor experience wouldn't last a day or two in the wilderness. Maybe you were privileged growing up surviving in the wild. But most city dwelling citizens couldn't tell what plant to eat or how to build a fire.

Besides, books have been essential in developing societies for centuries. Why ignore them?



posted on Mar, 12 2009 @ 11:06 AM
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Yeah this book is pretty buzzball.

All I've got at the moment is the urban survival guide and if that's anything to go off then the real deal is a gem of a book to own come SIT X
`



posted on Mar, 16 2009 @ 10:17 AM
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I have this book and really am enjoying all the different items that are covered.

I think some of the best sections are the sections where they show you different type of poisonus plants and edible plants. Lots of great detail on how to make a camp, how to hunt/trap, and how to survive in different climates.

Cheers,

Otto



posted on Mar, 16 2009 @ 10:33 AM
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Horace Kephart's "Camping and Woodcraft" is another really good book that covers a broad range of survival skills- from firemaking and basic shelter to processing game, making leather, cordage etc. Most of the information is only useful if you're in the woods, but it's definitely worth reading. One of the big problems with the book is that it was written so long ago, almost all of the gear he recommends is totally obsolete. It helps if you substitute contemporary equivalents to the materials he suggests- but the underlying concepts he uses are strong.

I have the SAS Survival guide as well, and I agree that it's one of the best resources out there. I've been studying it and Kephart's book for a while, and practicing techniques from them as much as I can. Reading how to do something is one thing, but actually doing it is quite another. Having a good book will be useful if things get bad. But having the actual, physical skills to do things is very important. After you do something a few times, you work out the kinks and become much more efficient at it. Having to do something for the first time in a survival situation is less than ideal.

[edit on 16-3-2009 by moonwilson]



posted on Mar, 17 2009 @ 12:51 AM
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reply to post by spymaster
 


try half.com or amazon.



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