It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

1.5 million year old footprints found in kenya SIZE 9's

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 02:26 PM
link   
Anthroplogists have found the tracks of an early homonid in sediments in Kenya.

The prints indicate that our ancestors had fully made the transition to living on the ground by that time.


1.5 million year old size 9's found in Kenya




I am surprised at the size, that to me would indicate an idividual that was nearly the size of a modern human.

I personaly believe that our arboreal ancestors were very far back, millions of years farther back than thought.
There are fosils from the med. that indicate a semi erect primate lived there 6 million years ago.




posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 02:31 PM
link   
reply to post by punkinworks09
 


We're not native to this planet, these are not our ancestors..



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 02:34 PM
link   
It's a nice link to our ancestors... But I'm not all that surprised this one had the same sized feet as my self!

I do agree that it is entirely possible that modern man existed well before we commonly accept - heck I believe there are whole civilisations and technological developments that have either been miss, mis understood or just plain over looked.

I like to think back then humanity was much more diverse - it's just over all homo sapian won through in the long game.



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 03:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by Now_Then
I do agree that it is entirely possible that modern man existed well before we commonly accept - heck I believe there are whole civilisations and technological developments that have either been miss, mis understood or just plain over looked.
I do agree that it is entirely possible that modern man existed well before we commonly accept

"Modern Man?"

There's no evidence of modern man from this time period.

Even the article mentions it's likely to be H. Ergaster, an early form of H. Erectus.

Believe what you want about earlier civilizations. If you look into it at even the shallowest of depths, you'll see there's simply no evidence for it and overwhelming evidence against it.

Don't let a little thing like evidence dissuade you though. Why should you? Very few other posters here do.

Harte



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 03:37 PM
link   
reply to post by Harte
 


Hi there Harte

I see you are in good form today!




My good friend Mr. Ergaster

The HE's found have been of unusual size some over six feet (1.85 m)

I believe there is some non-concensus on when HE separated from Homo Erectus.



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 03:40 PM
link   
They were not arboreal. That is nonsense.
I don't know how could anyone think they were arboreal.
There's nothing in their anatomy or any other traces, except some wrongly understood idea of evolution, that points out those ancestors were arboreal.



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 03:42 PM
link   
reply to post by Harte
 


Yes but the article also says...


Modern feet mark just one of several dramatic shifts in early humans, specifically regarding the appearance of Homo erectus around 2 million years ago. Homo erectus is the first hominid to have the same body proportions as modern Homo sapiens.


Now 'modern man' is a little gray area... But I'm gonna say personally I'd go with hunter gathers using tools... Hunter gather is not a very efficient life style, but little is known about the actual lives these 'people' lived.

I would like to think you could select a few individuals from 1.5 million years ago from birth - y'know snatch em from their mothers arms right on day one and put them into today's world... I bet they would pick thing up quite well - probably there would be social problems, frustration and anger, but so far as reading and maths go I bet they would learn to about a 14 year old's standard by the time they were adult... And I bet they would teach us a few things also.



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 03:59 PM
link   
reply to post by DangerDeath
 


Howdy DD

These dudes were aboreal but our and there earlier ancestor were, just go back a few million years. As to when we came out of the tree is a matter of some debate.

Hi there NT

Yeah lots of grey area with a few points of data. Snatching up a HE and bring them back here, Hmmmm well that would be interesting to see how much brain power they actually have.

Lets ask for a grant....oh wait... LOL



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 04:43 PM
link   
Another not very bright theory about using a lot of energy to chew raw meat.
What do you think they needed those hand axes for?
To peel off meat and then smash it into a Tartar steak. No chewing at all...

Just thinking creatively...

Do you think they used ropes, harnesses, lasso, bolas?

[edit on 26-2-2009 by DangerDeath]



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 08:00 PM
link   
reply to post by Now_Then
 




Now 'modern man' is a little gray area...

they are refering to basically modern anatomy, the proportions of our bodies and limbs and the basic structures of our anatomy havent changed much since.




Hunter gather is not a very efficient life style, but little is known about the actual lives these 'people' lived.


thats not at all true,

depending on the environment it can be an amazingly efficient way of life.

If you want to see how these people lived, there are a few (a couple maybe?)cultures left in the wild tropical places around the world, that are living a lifestyle not too different.
There a small groups of extremely isolated tribes in new guniea, that until just a few years ago lived a lifestyle not at all different from our Homo Erectus ancestors.
They didnt practice any agriculture and lived an entirely gatherer/hunter lifestyle.



posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 08:21 PM
link   
reply to post by punkinworks09
 


It depends on your point of view but hunter-gathers (especially in places like Polynesia where they took up farming too_. Can be quite a good life style. One that we followed for hundreds if not a million years or more - and until the 19th century was rather common.

Hunter-gathering/scavenging was one of our more successful inventions.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join