Have you told your Family Yet?

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posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 11:23 AM
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*looks around*


wow we have a great imagination then, it actually manifested itself......

chicken lil syndrome?




posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 12:31 PM
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I was asked to post the contents of my BOB. I know there are several other lists out there. I hope you all will consider the items in this list along with those found in other lists to create a bag that's ideal for you and the people you'll be with. List Follows:

This is the new list of items I recommend be included in your Bug-Out-Bag. This is not an all inclusive list. For purposes of individual preference I strongly urge you to include items that you may need for personal reasons that are not included (such as epi-pen, allergy medications, important life saving medications). As Always, should you need assistance with selections, I am always happy to help.

Bag = REI Lookout
INSIDE FLAP POCKET
One 2.5 ounce container of 98% pure DEET (bug repellant)
One pair of safety glasses kept in plastic case (get these at Lowe’s or Home Depot)
Stormproof Matches (fantastic in rain or high winds)
Two carabiners (make sure these are load bearing and not those ones for your keys)
Fire Paste (comes in handy if you don’t have dry wood to start off with)
MAIN POCKET
One 32 oz. Nalgene wide mouth bottle (BPA Free) Fill it with these:
One medium sized key ring carabiner
One key ring compass (small but effective)
One .5 fl oz bottle of Stingeze (if you need this, you’ll love having it)
One match container (make sure it has a flint striker on the bottom)
One emergency whistle (can be heard far further than the human voice, make sure it also has a compass and thermometer on it)
Two small strips of sandpaper (for various uses including matches)
One tick removal tool (also great for getting out slivers, magnifying glass that comes with it can start fires)
One pair of fingernail clippers
One titanium spork (lightweight, won’t easily melt like plastic)
One pair of leather work gloves (wear them and make sure they fit)
One emergency radio (I use the Grundig FR-200 for features & hand crank power)
Eight glow sticks (four different colors) used as visual indicators. Establish what the colors mean. Allows night time signal that others will not be able to determine)
One 32 oz. Nalgene wide mouth bottle (BPA Free) Fill it with these:
One key-ring carabiner
One First Aid Guide
One scissors
One tweezers
Every bandaid you can afford of different sizes and kinds
At least 6 alcohol pads (for cleaning wounds)
At least three freezer zip-loc bags
One Bivvy Sack (I have the Thermo-Lite 2.0 by Adventure Medical)
One bag of zip-ties (these things come in VERY handy for many uses, even handcuffs)
One roll of Duct Tape (buy the good stuff and keep it in the plastic wrapper)
Two 16 Meter lengths of 6mm accessory cord (for hoisting packs in bear country)
One water filtration system (I use the MSR Miniworks EX)
One candle lantern with extra candles (light and heat inside a tent)
One emergency Anorak (a waterproof jacket, get XL, mine is by Sierra Designs)
One Airman’s Manual (AFMAN 10-100) Will help you through lots, find on Amazon
One set of NITEIZE, Figure 9 rope tighteners (makes hoisting with ropes a breeze)
One plastic mirror (won’t shatter, can be used for signaling)
One inflatable pillow (great for pillow of seat for cold weather lookouts)
One sleep pad (you’ll freeze laying on damp ground otherwise, I have a Big Agnes REM Sleep Pad 20 x 72 x 2.5)
TOP POCKET
One leatherman (or other multitool)
One “SAS Survival Guide” by John “Lofty” Wiseman” in a zip-loc bag
One small wire-bound notebook with three pens (not the liquid pens) I use the “Rite in the Rain All-Weather Notebook” by J.L. Darling Corp.
Your best compass (mine is the Silva Guide Model #426)
Your secondary Multitool


Okay, that’s my bug-out-bag. I keep it in my vehicle rather than the house. Things I will add to the bag (with the carabiners) when I have to abandon the vehicle and press on walking, are: map book, first aid kit, hatchet, and 3 D-Cell LED Maglite.

This is one of the bags my family DOES know about. They know what's in it, and where it is. They know why all the things I put in it are in it. This is a personal BOB, it's not a Family BOB. I choose to focus on individuals. If you are in need of a Family BOB list, I would start with the list above, then get smaller bags for the rest of the members and put in there all the things they would need, though not necessarily everything listed above.

Some of the key things to remember:

1. With the amount of uncertainty in the world right now, avoid footwear that you won't be able to walk ten miles in while out in the weather you're having to deal with.

2. Discuss with your family what you'd all do if the cell / phone networks went down. Rally points are a great way to do this. Use an earthquake or loss of power as reasoning for bringing it up.

3. Know secondary and tertiary routes from where you work to where you live.

4. If you live in a city and feel that you'd be safer in a rural area, know where it is that you'll go. Are others likely to choose the same spot? Is this area going to be patrolled? Are there several ways to get to this area?

5. If you are unarmed, you need to make sure you keep others you don't trust away from you by at least twenty feet. Keep your distance. If you are armed, make sure you unholster your sidearm and cock it before the person is within twenty feet of you. Let them know you have it by holding it in your hand. Only an aggressive person will advance. In that case, you'll have to make a decision promptly.

Once you're back with your family, figure out whether you want to remain in place or move to your pre-determined secondary location. I call this your Site Bravo. Also have a Site Charlie in mind should the area you chose be one someone else did as well. Really be creative when choosing sites. If you stay home the stuff you've saved up will be very important, but not as important as if you choose to leave.

Any questions, please feel free to ask.



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by hstock28
 


I was in a gunshop looking for a shotgun yesterday and I noticed that there were a fair amount of ladies in there shopping for handguns and other things. There was one mom over near where I was looking at small cal rifles and she was shopping for her 12 yo son. She was looking at 22 cal rifles. So, you may have to purchase items and put them away.

When it comes to food stuffs, buy things that you can use and incorporate into your current diet. That way you are buying for the family needs now and that it is being rotated. As far as ammo and guns are concerned...find away to get the bare nec items. I am urging my co-driver to purchase a shotgun and 22 rifle at the very least and get some food and other items...his budget for his family is so titght that it is tough-but he will do it.

I cannot say I understand being married, however, you have to provide for the family and if something happens, regardless if it is man made, nature or something else- you must provide for the family-even if your "other" isnt. Find away to be prepared with less.

Food Calculator Note I am not Mormon-but this is very useful!

I am not sure what part of the country people are in, but I find some like mined people and network.



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 12:50 PM
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You know, I'm lucky because my girl friend is just as aware of these issues as I am. I know that when the # hits the fan we will meet quickly and enable our plans with military precision. We are both well armed and well informed. And intent on taking care of our community with the involvement of the community.



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 12:53 PM
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Originally posted by Whisper67Now, I've considered buying a can of spam and some beef jerky everytime I go to the store to put in reserve but the poster, sorry hun, don't remember your handle, about stocking up on rice and beans - brilliant! Even included spices! Okay, where do YOU live? lol


The important thing is to make sure you prepare so that you don't have to find people like me (I'm the one who you're commenting about here
) Beans & Rice have a very good feature, they expand significantly. A little makes a lot.


That same poster mentioned he had compasses, maps ect. I think I have a crush on you...Our best bet would be to head to my father in laws. Now there's a man! He's got a nice piece of rural land in Illinois, he's an excellant hunter. Problem, he's three hours away. Am I right in my thinking there's zero chance we could make it there? 70 W would be a gridlock nightmare and we would for sure end up in the FEMA camp - now I'm serious about this question and would like an intelligent response.


I have since provided a post of the items in my BOB. If you're looking to acquire some of those things, I'd print out that list and take it with you to your favorite outdoors store. They'll have a lot of it. Find sales and discounts. That's how I put together all that stuff. A little at a time, we may just not have a whole lot of time left. As to your serious question, 3 hours is doable, but you'll have to think about alternative routes. Get out a map and look at the back roads. Those back roads are both a benefit and a detriment at the same time. A benefit in that they will likely be less crowded, and a detriment in that there are people who will likely seize upon the opportunity to stop vehicles and take everything you have. Timing is critical here. If something goes down, that's when you hop in your car and leave. Right then. The longer you wait, the more things deteriorate. Secondary and tertiary routes are a great idea. Know them. You'll likely have to fill up on the way, unless you keep your car full at all times (NEVER allow it to drop below half a tank). You CAN make that trip, but you'll have to be quick about it.

1. Know your routes and keep the car filled with fuel
2. Have your BOB's ready in the garage so that when it's time to go, you can literally "Bug Out".
3. Make sure you have enough cash on you to pay for fuel along the way. Don't depend on credit.
4. If something looks suspicious, it likely is. Time, Distance, & Shielding is a great thing to keep in mind (though it's for nuclear exposure, it'll work here too). The less you expose you and your family to threats, the safer you'll be. The more distance you keep between yourself and those around you, the safer you'll be (keep at least ten feet between you and the car in front of you at all times - never break that rule). Three car lengths are preferred. Shielding is important too. Lock your doors, keep your windows rolled up, and always try to keep something between you and someone you find suspicious.

Making sure you have the supplies you need is one thing. Being prepared to use them is something else entirely. Good luck to you.

[edit on 25-2-2009 by bpg131313]



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 01:37 PM
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Yeah, you guys go ahead and spend all yur money and be prepared for the Giant Disastrous Whatever, just like back during -- Y2K -- . I'll bet everyone was really GLAD they were ready when the giant disaster from Y2K happened. OOps. Oh wait. Nothing happened after Y2K. Well then, I suppose them pinko my'noritees are gonna acum a'gittn fer yer GUNS! Dontcha wish ther wuz still lynchins, so thens everywuns wuld feel more rite?
(I'm making a point sarcastically, but I have a feeling I better clarify that in a thread like this wun).



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by simonecharisse
 



Get an education man. Learn about how economic breakdowns affect crime rates and social unrest. Read about what the government is doing, about how the economy is going, and how people are reacting. This isn't about waiting out some doomsday scenario. It's about being prepared for the reasonable expectation that things could become unstable.



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 01:43 PM
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First off I stocked up very well but some things to add.

Don't sit there and explain to your family that the NWO is ran by reptilians who want to enslave the world into one order.

Or any other odd conspiracies.... If they ask just say that you want to be prepared for something if it happens and that you think the world is a little bit crazy right now.

-Psycho



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 02:23 PM
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I'm amazed, it took a full 6 pages for the trolls to jump in. I have to laugh and wonder what they will do if / when TSHTF. What they fail to realize is that by putting stuff away for a rainy day, we have lost nothing. Another point is what I spent a dollar on today I am sure will cost more next month, so I saved some money in the long run.

Spiritowl



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by simonecharisse
 


Well thank you for such a great reply.

First, I am fairly sure that most survivalist do not spend all their money on as you say " something that never happened "

Second, like someone has pointed out, you need car insurance, but hey whats the point, you're not going to crash are you ! but if you do, you are covered.

There are many, many survivalists on this board and many more out there, some think that doomsday will happen very soon, some are just happy to have enough food to feed their family's for a year without struggling should things take a turn for the worst.

If you really feel that nothing will ever happen, why are you here ??



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 02:29 PM
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good post many idea for my BOB

What size bags do you recommend for a medium carry. E.G a 75 ltr bag ?



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by simonecharisse
 


OK. So some people are burying hundreds of dollars worth of food and things. That's fine for them. I'm not going that far.

I think the key with most people is that they are stocking up on things that they would eventually use anyway. That's what I'm doing. It's an old concept called a "pantry". When you go to your pantry, and you pull out batteries, for instance, make a note to replace them so you have spares. Keep a rotating stock of most of the items that are your staples.

If I could suggest two more items for everyone's BOB or pantry.

Immodium and laxative. Honestly, if you're living on a diet of beans and rice after SHTF and your system isn't used to it...you'll be happier you have these around. They're also helpful in just any worst case scenario.



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by thecrow001
good post many idea for my BOB

What size bags do you recommend for a medium carry. E.G a 75 ltr bag ?


The bag I suggested was a 40 liter. You can get much bigger than that, but it's going to take up a lot more space in your car. Ideally, you want to be as light as possible because you may have to go an extended distance on foot. One thing I didn't add to that BOB, because I tell everyone to customize, is their own personal clothing. A BOB without clothing is really lacking. Make sure you have a change of clothes and a second pair of footware. Make sure your gear is designed for the worst weather, not the best conditions.



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 02:58 PM
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Originally posted by WickettheRabbit
reply to post by simonecharisse
 


OK. So some people are burying hundreds of dollars worth of food and things. That's fine for them. I'm not going that far.

I think the key with most people is that they are stocking up on things that they would eventually use anyway. That's what I'm doing. It's an old concept called a "pantry". When you go to your pantry, and you pull out batteries, for instance, make a note to replace them so you have spares. Keep a rotating stock of most of the items that are your staples.

If I could suggest two more items for everyone's BOB or pantry.

Immodium and laxative. Honestly, if you're living on a diet of beans and rice after SHTF and your system isn't used to it...you'll be happier you have these around. They're also helpful in just any worst case scenario.


And you're right. Most people wouldn't go to such extremes. But then again, I'm thinking worst case scenario, not a minor inconvenience. When this whole thing goes down, it's going to make the riots of L.A. appear to be a picnic. Think of all the people out there that wouldn't have a problem with attacking you for what you have, especially when they were the ones that chose not to stock up at all. It's going to get dicey. Here's my reasoning for what I did. Fire. If someone doesn't get what they want and they are repelled from your property (they won't be solo by the way), they will choose the age old option of burning your house down. When you want to displace a population you do so by removing their place to live. They will move out all on their own, and they will become beggars themselves. If everything you have is within the confines of your walls, you'd better be sure that you live in a non-combustible structure, to include your roof. This was known as a "Sweep and Clear" operation in Vietnam.

Does this mean I'm certain it will happen? Definitely not. But by making sure that all of your assets are within the walls of your combustible house, you've essentially put all of your eggs into one basket. I'd rather be safe than sorry, especially knowing that fire is an incredibly powerful motivation tool to get people out of their houses and off their property.

As for the Imodium and laxatives, I did mention in my BOB posting that I strongly suggest people to customize their medical supplies based upon personal preference. If the SHTF in a truly epic fashion, I'd suffice it to say that nearly everyone will be on a diet that they are unaccustomed to.



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 03:00 PM
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Oh right thanks i was thinking off a very large bag as i think i would be alone and be on the move all the time just like a nomad i guess.

I know the US are alot closer to this situation but how far would the UK be behind if it happens to the US

Would it effect us ?



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 03:06 PM
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My girlfriend is rather skeptical about any type of situation X, and she says that if SHTF, she'll just leave and go to Peru. She's got family there and thinks it's better than the US. I have however gotten my father to see what I see after 10 years of talking to him and trying to show him what's wrong with this place, and he's finally seen the light. He's stocking up just like I am, and we'll work together should stuff go down. That's very nice in my situation, since he and I used to never see eye to eye on anything and pretty much dislike each other to the fullest extent. We're now father and son again, rather than the ******* and the punk. Warms my heart that imminent disaster can bring us together


[edit on 2/25/2009 by JetshadowTRUE]



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 03:17 PM
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Originally posted by thecrow001
Oh right thanks i was thinking off a very large bag as i think i would be alone and be on the move all the time just like a nomad i guess.

I know the US are alot closer to this situation but how far would the UK be behind if it happens to the US

Would it effect us ?


It is far more likely that the wave of genuine misfortune will begin in Eastern Europe and spread to Western Europe, ending up on your doorstep before ours here in the US. I have many friends in Europe and Great Britain and one thing they all seem to tell me is that they are extremely worried about what could happen because the populations of the nations in Europe are dependent on their governments to provide so much for them. It's even more brutal when you factor in that few people live in single-family housing where they own the land and structure. We've intertwined our economies so tightly that we're now all essentially in this together.

As this thread is titled, "Have you told your family yet?"? You may want to start discussing options. This downturn will be global. It'll affect my friends in Europe, my friends here in the US, my friends in Asia, and myself equally. Preparation is the key to making sure you do well in the coming crisis.

Best of luck to you over there.



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 03:17 PM
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reply to post by JetshadowTRUE
 


It's a pretty long walk to Peru. I wouldn't make Plan A be to leave the country. I think that most travel will be restricted to the point where international travel isn't going to be allowed. I would be very surprised if any of the airports are operational outside of military aircraft if it all goes bad.



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 03:23 PM
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Don't buy gold. It's going to be worthless. Instead stock up on extra things people might really need and be willing to barter for...meds, jeans, food.

As for me informing my family...well I'm probably divorced now because of my mindset. However, my dad prepared us, I'm prepared, and I've prepared my son. We have supplies, bug-out-bags, meeting places and backups, and a network.

Yeah...hope it never happens but be ready just in case.

Peace.

[edit on 25-2-2009 by ~Lucidity]



posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 03:24 PM
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Originally posted by kettlebellysmith

I would like to know where I can lay my hands on some 5 gallon buckets and lids. I'd hate for mice to get into my supplies.

Do you have any rubbermaid type bins that are air tight? Some have holes in the handle for some reason. As long as your food is in packages of some type and not touching the container, IMO you'd be ok as far as chemicals from plastic go.

As far as food grade 5 gallon buckets go; I got mine for free from a friend that works at the bakery at my local Wal*mart. They even came with lids with gaskets. Just about any bakery or resteraunt would do. I'm guessing you don't have to know someone there, but I thnk it helps. The only problem I have now is that the lids that came with the buckets are really had to get on and off. I'd need a malot or hammer to get them on and I might have to get a crowbar to get them off. Instead I think I'll just get some gama lids.
does anyone know of a website where I can get a good deal on gamma lid seals?

[edit on 25-2-2009 by FunSized]





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