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Atlanta Cops Jailed For Killing 92 Year Old Great Grand Mother

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posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 05:24 PM
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This just sets me off. Only 5 years huh?
Even though they planted bags of weed?
THIS IS CRAP!
But because they are cops they get special treatment. They are us and should receive the same as we would especially after planting weed to cover their butts up.

This has officially upset me.
Just more corruption and cops with an ego.......
I'm going to go have a smoke........




posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 05:50 PM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

Click here for more information.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 06:05 PM
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Originally posted by g raj
How do these guys only get 5-10 years for murdering and then conspiring to cover up their bad deeds. I think that the punishment for cops killing innocent civilians in their own homes should be double the maximum for murder. They demand more respect and power than a common citizen, they should be held to higher standards. What is the sentence for killing a cop? If it is longer than what these jackwipes were given for killing and trying to frame an innocent old lady, this country and legal system are in far worse shape than i had imagined(and i always imagine the worst).
A effin man! Have any of you heard of "SWATing" some punk picks out a random address, calls the cops, and makes up a story bad enough to send the cavalry.
Our police need to change current policies, in search and seizure.
They need to stop focusing on arrests for bonuses, I.E. monetary seizures, gun confiscation, for resale.
More intelligence, less neglect for human life.
If your a cop, and you are there to serve, you made a choice.
To serve and protect, not destroy and neglect.
To any police on this site, I commend your service and thank you for it.
We do need you, but things like this, must not happen!!!
Especially if you care about public support, apparently some of your bretheren don't.
You good guys, and you know who you are, keep vigil for us.
Peace.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 06:10 PM
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As most of you who visit these types of threads already know I am a LEO and this incident is inexcusable. Never should this happen...EVER. I have executed MANY no knock search warrants and before we hit that door, we knew EXACTLY who was in there, what was going on and understood the situation from A to Z.

I knew one of the officers, since I am in GA too..and let me tell you...he was a complete --- and didn't deserve to wear the badge.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 06:38 PM
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Originally posted by donwhite
This is not to say there is no homosexuality in the pen, for as you may also know it is very hard to keep two people who want to share sex not to.


True dat.

Did a stretch in a state pen a few years back, and I can say that there is very little "rape" that goes on, or at least there was in my camps.

There are too many people who will do it for a few dollars worth of canteen. The raping really isn't worth it. That being said, there are a lot of people who will try to sweat you for your tangible goods behind the threat of a butt kicking.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 06:45 PM
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reply to post by rcwj75
 


Appreciate what you do and know the majority are good people. I got a question for you though, I understand a no knock search may be required in some rare cases but the article also said they were in plain clothes
is that common it seems to be asking for trouble kicking in someones door out of uniform. Also you don't have to answer this if you don't want but is caring around contraband to plant s.o.p.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 06:52 PM
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Originally posted by frankdatank
Appreciate what you do and know the majority are good people. I got a question for you though, I understand a no knock search may be required in some rare cases but the article also said they were in plain clothes
is that common it seems to be asking for trouble kicking in someones door out of uniform. Also you don't have to answer this if you don't want but is caring around contraband to plant s.o.p.


Thanks frank! As for the carrying around dope or a drop gun SOP/Normal...no...only by cops who don't deserve to be such. If you do your job RIGHT and confidently...you don't need that crap.

As for the plains clothing..yes it normal, yes its dangerous...but USUALLY there is always 1 or 2 uniformed officers taking up the rear to cut down on the confusion. Also plain clothing or not when you are serving a warrant you ALWAYS vest up..and on that vest 99% of SOP's require it to be marked with SHERIFF or POLICE...also, on a no knock you still announce who you are once the door is open.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 07:30 PM
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reply to post by John Matrix
 





Their jobs are mostly boring and routine, which is why anyone with above a 115 IQ eventually quits and moves on to more challenging career. They like them to be dumb, between IQ 95 and 105 rating cuz they have the kind of tunnel vision they like cops to have. They get paid fine for what they do, and they have benefit packages too, plus job security.



Mr J/M, I think you are being way too hard on our police. Because I liked to drive too fast and have a car that made too much noise, I can say I have been stopped by the police more times than I can count. I have been arrested 3 times and taken away. I’ve spent 100s of dollars in fines and done more time in traffic school than the law ought to allow. But to the policeman who stopped me, I have always been polite, and non-combative. Non confrontational. I have never had a policeman say anything untoward to me.

I worked in the local courthouse 17 years. I have encountered many policemen over the years. City. County. State. Federal. As for smarts, they seemed to be as smart as I and my fellow employees. Or as smart as judges and prosecutors. Or as smart as defense lawyers. In fact, many times they were smarter than any of the above.

I agree policing is often boring. And the worst part of policing is to have to make a life-death decision in a split second, then have it parsed for the next weeks, months or years. I’ve known a few policemen who when they were retiring told me they had never drawn their weapon. I have know others who were often in trouble for over-reacting and using excessive force.

I recall one incident where a smallish policeman stopped a drunk driver going the wrong way on an expressway. He tried to extricate the drunk from the stalled car to avoid him being injured by an accident. In the course of the extrication, the man broke the cop’s collar bone and worst of all, he bit the cop. That is one of the most serious injuries you can have. A human bite! The cop never drew his weapon. I would have been inclined to at least shoot the @%!# in the foot! Self control. Exemplified.

All too often the man in the front line is not the man who should have done the preparatory work better. I don’t know who invented NO KNOCK warrants which I have already labeled as an oxymoron. But the cop on the street who has to serve it did not invent it. I don’t like SWAT teams in camo and I don’t want our police armed with M16s. But all that is largely due to the NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION and 2nd Amendment guffaw crowd.

Every policeman has a right to expect to come home to his family at shifts end. But like any other person, each cop must be responsible for his own actions. Sometimes we make wrong choices that haunt us a lifetime. We cannot prevent this from happening, but the Chief of Police should try very hard! That is HIS job.


[edit on 2/24/2009 by donwhite]



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by donwhite
 




No doubtedly alot of us skim the posts here alot, sometimes not visiting the actual source article...

the OP highlights

officers found none and tried to cover up the mistake by planting baggies of marijuana


but the article states

"But prosecutors say officers found none and tried to cover up the mistake by planting baggies of marijuana



also in the end of the article..

Tesler was sentenced in May to four and a half years in prison on a state charge for lying to FBI agents, but that conviction was overturned on appeal last month.



Even though everybody knows that this "planting" happens.. period, I'm just trying to clarify and be a bit more exact in the reporting, instead of biased quoting.. highlighting.


Not taking sides..just trying to be a bit more exact here.

-



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 08:09 PM
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Originally posted by Wethesheeple
I wonder where in GA this was? Must have not been close to me or I would've heard something about it. Anyway hope those cops are ready for years of manly lovin.


This was in Atlanta. It happen a couple of years back, it's just now coming to justice.

Thank goodness...



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 08:12 PM
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Originally posted by rcwj75
...also, on a no knock you still announce who you are once the door is open.


At least you are *supposed* to.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 08:41 PM
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Let's hope justice is served in prison to these officers of the peace.... I'm sure they will not be protected their entire time and will get what they deserve.... Maybe others will see what it will be like if they become an officer of the peace....



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 08:48 PM
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reply to post by prevenge
 





No doubtedly a lot of us skim the posts here a lot, sometimes not visiting the actual source article... the OP highlights

[officers found none and tried to cover up the mistake by planting baggies of marijuana]

but the article states

["But prosecutors say officers found none and tried to cover up the mistake by planting baggies of marijuana]



Your point is valid. Obviously I did that on purpose. Those were the significant words to me. Those words conveyed the message I wanted to deliver. I expect all the posters here would have made other choices had they have been in my position. Anyone who reads the first 4 issues can see where I’m coming from. There were other tacks anyone could have taken. But your criticism is acknowledged.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 09:03 PM
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reply to post by John Matrix
 

I don't know where you get your information from but I've been a police officer for 15 years and before that I was a computer programmer for another 15 years. I have an IQ of 156 and I enjoy my job because I get to help people.
As far as pay I receive less than 23K per year. The health insurance sucks, retirement is a joke and there are no other compensations.
I'm shocked that you would think that we get paid fine for what we do. Sure, most of the time everything is mundane then we have to respond to a shooting call, a disturbance or a burglary in progress, etc. At that point we earn every penny we make and then some.
Don't talk about things you have no knowledge of unless you walk in our footsteps first.
Lots of people downgrade the police but when they need help they're the first to call.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 09:23 PM
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Originally posted by donwhite
...I can say I have been stopped by the police more times than I can count. I have been arrested 3 times and taken away. I’ve spent 100s of dollars in fines and done more time in traffic school than the law ought to allow.
...
I worked in the local courthouse 17 years. ...


Does anyone else see this as a problem? Does anyone else see this as indicative that the police and the justice system does NOT want law-abiding citizens working for them?

Just curious....



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 09:25 PM
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One other thing:

Did you notice that they came ready to plant evidence? What would have happened if it had been a young, black male that lived there, instead of a 90 year old woman? You think they would have said "sorry!", or do you think they would have went ahead and planted the drugs?



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 10:09 PM
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reply to post by sir_chancealot
 




Does anyone else see this as a problem? Does anyone else see this as indicative that the police and the justice system does NOT want law-abiding citizens working for them? Just curious....



I suppose I’m expected to reply?

Many of the times I referred to I was under 18, a juvenile and no arrest record follows you into adult-hood. Not always. But traffic arrests not involving serious issues such as attempt to elude, or leaving the scene of an accident or vehicular homicide are the only disqualifying traffic offenses.

Going 100 mph in a 70 mph zone is not an earth shaking event. And bears no discernible relationship to one’s ability to perform clerical tasks.

So that’s my reply.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 10:23 PM
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reply to post by AllTiedTogether
 




Let's hope justice is served in prison to these officers of the peace. ... I'm sure they will not be protected their entire time and will get what they deserve. ... Maybe others will see what it will be like if they become an officer of the peace. ...



It's hard for me to read you post. You said "I'm sure they will not be protected their entire time and will get what they deserve . . " It is the legal (and moral) obligation of the prison authority to insure the safety of EVERY prisoner. The Warden of a prison is like the principal of a school or the guardian of a child or disabled person. He is responsible. For the health, safety and welfare of his charges.

Your post sounds too much to me like the same abu Ghraib type I admonished earlier. It is not macho to wish a helpless person harm.

[edit on 2/24/2009 by donwhite]



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 10:48 PM
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This is a clear violation of the Constitution. Good thing they're being locked up. It doesn't matter if they have bags and bags of coc aine in their basements, if there's no evidence (suspicion alone is NOT enough) then there is no right to entry on behalf of the law enforcement. Using the excuse "drugs are exceedingly harmful to society and therefore justifies a violation private property rights" is just NOT acceptable. It's the cops' duty to adapt and use better investigating techniques before anything else is considered. A message to cops: do the actual work. If you skip out and this happens to my house I wouldn't hesitate for a second to blow your faces right off.

[edit on 24-2-2009 by cognoscente]



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 11:02 PM
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reply to post by donwhite
 


I just want to say that the 'bad' guys, when they brought planted evidence, proved that this was a premeditated felony, and the fact their co-conspirator, the judge, let those of her own felonius gang off rather easy by not convicting for the murder they committed. But I suppose it all equals out; they don't have a chance to get out of prison alive unless their 'gang' takes steps to protect them in prison.



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