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Edible trees

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posted on Feb, 25 2009 @ 11:19 AM
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www.survivaliq.com...

www.survivaliq.com...

I found this website following you lead and it offers some really good tips for basic survival.

Thought you might find this helpful.




posted on Feb, 26 2009 @ 08:38 AM
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This is a good webiste for anyone needing info on edible/medicinal/poisonous plants.

I'm thinking of spending a month or two with this group this year.

Plants for a Future



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 06:02 PM
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reply to post by AngelInterceptor
 

yew berries are edible its the seeds inside that must not be eaten, thes can be extracted by squeezing the berry.

tree wisdom book gives examples of trees that are edible and medicinal, as does the natural guide to medicinal herbs and plants.
m x



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 06:10 PM
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It's not that easy for human beings to digest cellulose, so tree eating should probably only be considered as a last resort. A better plan would be to raise critters who can digest cellulose, like termites and goats and so on, and then eat them or use them for other things like milk and cheese.

Goats are great. They are your survivalist friends.



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 06:27 PM
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Originally posted by Nohup
It's not that easy for human beings to digest cellulose, so tree eating should probably only be considered as a last resort. A better plan would be to raise critters who can digest cellulose, like termites and goats and so on, and then eat them or use them for other things like milk and cheese.

Goats are great. They are your survivalist friends.


I have goats. Why do you like them so much?

I have some mutt goats and recently purchased a la mancha buck. Next spring hope to have some good milkers. The ones I have now are so-so. La manchas will give a whole lot of milk. You can culture it and make kefir and cheese and such. I've not figured out how to make butter because the milk doesn't separate out very well.

Why do you like goats? I find they break down the stall walls and fences. They make for lots of little repair jobs on a constant basis. If you are raising only goats, it's much easier, but if you have poultry those goats can be a pain trying to find a way to feed your poultry without the goats hogging up all the food.

One goat had two kids a couple weeks ago, rejected one of them, and we're raising it in the bathtub now. She had one buck and one doe, same as last year. Bucks are useless when they are just mutt goats. Last year out of four babies three were bucks.

In the fall when the goats get into breeding, their milk starts tasting goaty, not very pleasant. They dry up and stop milking in the winter also. I suppose you could keep them going, but ours just dried up and weren't interested in being milked even with a grain bribe.



posted on Feb, 27 2009 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by Salt of the Earth
 


The saying stubborn as a goat came about for a really good reason.

I keep warning people that raising goats is a lot of hard work.

For some reason people think that goats are easy to raise because they falsely believe that all you have to do is stick then out in a field and make sure they have water and that is all there is to it.

Wrong.

Very wrong.



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 12:56 AM
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Originally posted by Salt of the Earth

I have some mutt goats and recently purchased a la mancha buck. Next spring hope to have some good milkers. The ones I have now are so-so. La manchas will give a whole lot of milk. You can culture it and make kefir and cheese and such. I've not figured out how to make butter because the milk doesn't separate out very well.



Back in my youth I spent two weeks living with a family in the sticks.

They had a small river that had a stream feeding it near the house. Over the stream they had assembled a water paddle that churned a large glass jar in the stream flow. Don't know how long it was in there but that's how their butter was made.



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 01:21 AM
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I like the idea of making maple syrup. I have two huge maples in my front yard. But you have to have those special flat pans to boil them down with, and preferably a woodstove to do it on.

Nothing's easy. I do admire the Amish. They are light years ahead of the rest of us in knowing how to live smart and live right, to live in a way that will not destroy their souls. It's hard enough to, even for the Amish, to keep their souls.

We live in a world that's controlled by an evil force who the Bible says comes only to "Lie, kill and destroy." Even the minions of this evil creature are hated by it.

The government is getting ready, looks like, to outlaw organic food. That's one good thing about goats, their poop. You can use it to make compost. Their milk is okay if you can figure out how to get rid of the goaty taste, which means drink it real fresh. Milk them, and turn the milk into cheese quick before it gets that taste.

Actually I'm thankful for my goats. I just haven't got the hang of things yet. I'm a city slicker trying to learn how to be self-sufficient in the country.



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 06:09 PM
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reply to post by Salt of the Earth
 


Just keep in mind it takes 40 gallons of sap from a maple to make 1 gallon of syrup!!

Have a good day and good luck to all!!-



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 11:27 PM
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Thanks for the heads up Nirgal. I guess the Christmas song "Chestnuts roasting on an open fire" should of been more specific. I've got Chinese chestnut growing in my yard (Edible) and I like useful trees in my yard, but those 7 horse chestnuts (Buck eyes) are going to get stomped in the Spring. To think all the time I spent watering them...



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 01:50 AM
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reply to post by korath
 


You know that, "I think I've left the gas on" moment?

I double-checked.

It would appear I'm still correct, although it might be worthwhile seeing if they are useful for anything else, other than missiles of course.



[edit on 1-3-2009 by Nirgal]



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by morganathefey
 


Yes, I know that. You will notice that I said only the leaves and seeds are poisonous.

The bark is also poisonous, but I said nothing about the flesh around the seed.

If I had been more thorough, as I should have been, then I would have mentioned this. My post was only meant as a general guide as trees and plants to avoid.



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