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Transgenes found in wild corn

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posted on Feb, 21 2009 @ 07:47 PM
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Transgenes found in wild corn


www.newscientist.com

NOW it's official: genes from genetically modified corn have escaped into wild varieties in rural Mexico. A new study resolves a long-running controversy over the spread of GM genes and suggests that detecting such escapes may be tougher than previously thought.

In 2001, when biologists David Quist and Ignacio Chapela reported finding transgenes from GM corn in traditional varieties in Oaxaca, Mexico, they faced a barrage of criticism over their techniques.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Feb, 21 2009 @ 07:47 PM
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Of course, it should come as no surprise that the mainstream scientific journal virtually blacklisted those scientists making the report in 2001.

It should also be no surprise that the transgenetic corn could not be 'contained'. Soon it will be no surprise that this commercial form of ecoterrorism will go unhindered, since they own everything and no-one can question them at all.

GM food will be the downfall of many healthy communities. And we will see catastrophic reactions in the wild, because nature simply doesn't 'obey' Monsanto's rules.

My greatest concern is the release of 'self-terminating' code into the wild. Making our only source of nourishment the domain of a single corporate combine. Alarmist? Perhaps; but I haven't seen anything more than financial success with no degree of actual increase in the well-being of mankind. Why we allow it is beyond me..., perhaps I should look to the Codex Alimentarium for answers....

www.newscientist.com (visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Feb, 21 2009 @ 09:15 PM
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Alarmist? Definitely not! Thanks for once again sounding the alarm re this type of crop. The corporate "self-terminating" code is scary.

Besides the biodiversity issue is the social issue. The use of this gm corn ended up a raw deal for the small Mexican farmer and a great deal for the big corn farmers, who not only gobbled up family land but Mex gov't subsidies as well to grow corn.
No surprise that the Mex govt was in a war in those southern Mex states against their own people, the peasants who lived off the land. Most Americans are not aware of this war but have been aware of one of its consequences, those Oaxacan citizens immigrating northward to the US. Solved Mexico's problem, too.

NAFTA...unintended or intended negative consequences don't bode well for any nation.

If an individual can be sent to prison for monkeywrenching a piece of equipment, then surely a corporation engages in ecoterrorism for monkeywrenching a crop. The FBI calls the individual act "special interest terrorism"; maybe we need another category, "corporate terrorism".



posted on Feb, 21 2009 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


This came out a couple of days ago regarding not allowing the scientists to test GMO seeds..... It isn't a mystery as to why. They know what they have done.


> www.nytimes.... com/2009/ 02/20/business/ 20crop.html



posted on Feb, 22 2009 @ 09:51 AM
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Originally posted by Maxmars
My greatest concern is the release of 'self-terminating' code into the wild. Making our only source of nourishment the domain of a single corporate combine. Alarmist? Perhaps


Yes, that is Alarmist!

Think about what you're saying. How is 'self-terminating' code going to establish itself in wild populations?

It can't because there is an inbuilt 'terminator' gene!



posted on Feb, 22 2009 @ 10:12 AM
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reply to post by C.H.U.D.
 


Or it could be a dormant trait that could trigger randomly though the plant population. Causing every few generations to just not produce seeds.

[edit on 22-2-2009 by Wertdagf]



posted on Feb, 22 2009 @ 10:20 AM
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Transgenes found in wild corn


Hey, if transgender people want to relax, enjoy the view and get some 'country time' in a corn field, then who is to stop them? They're people after all. It's 2009, let's move on from this kind of discrimination.


Actually, this is a nightmare. The very thing that all the detractors of Monsanto and their ilk have warned would happen, has happened. Who'd have thunk it? "We have procedures in place. We know what we're doing. We have strict regulations." Yeah, right.



posted on Feb, 22 2009 @ 10:27 AM
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This isn't necessarily a bad thing. People freak out when they hear "genetically enhanced" but it's really nothing to be afraid of. Corn itself was scarce and nearly inedible in its original form. Native Americans genetically engineered the corn we have today. www.nativeaccess.com...

My big thing is, People can scream and cry about how it's wrong and evil, but if we get this genetic engineering right, we can defeat world hunger.
newsroom.ucla.edu...



posted on Feb, 22 2009 @ 10:29 AM
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reply to post by Wertdagf
 


Well, if it's a recessive trait, and since it's deleterious, the gene would be in the wild population, but the frequency would be low. If the genotype of an individual is homozygous recessive for the terminator gene, it will not produce offspring, so the gene hits a dead end. In cases of individuals that are not homozygous recessive, but carry the gene, the gene would not be expressed in that generation.

Unless the gene conveys some kind of advantage to the species, the frequency of the gene in the population should decrease over time.

It's certainly not going to be the end of the world, that is for sure.



posted on Feb, 22 2009 @ 10:40 AM
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Originally posted by Avarus
This isn't necessarily a bad thing. People freak out when they hear "genetically enhanced" but it's really nothing to be afraid of. Corn itself was scarce and nearly inedible in its original form. Native Americans genetically engineered the corn we have today. www.nativeaccess.com...

My big thing is, People can scream and cry about how it's wrong and evil, but if we get this genetic engineering right, we can defeat world hunger.
newsroom.ucla.edu...


A completely laudable goal. However, as you say, it's about getting it right.

Selective breeding techniques have been used since man started to get it in his head that he could 'master' nature. However, the potential dangers in the past weren't as they are now. Selective breeding in animals was never a problem because, at worse, that particular line of animals would get sick, die, be infertile and so on. Before modern transportation and farming on the scale we have it now, if anything had gone wrong with plant cross-breeds there was less likelihood of it spreading as easy as it is now.



posted on Feb, 22 2009 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by Merriman Weir
 


Yes

Oh, Merriman, what is the significance of your sig? I'm curious.



Originally posted by Avarus
... if we get this genetic engineering right, we can defeat world hunger.


I remember reading years ago how canning food in metal containers was supposed to end hunger. As long as we put profit over people, let corporations abuse people, we will have hunger.

This corn in Mexico did not help hunger there.



posted on Feb, 22 2009 @ 05:05 PM
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Originally posted by Merriman Weir
Before modern transportation and farming on the scale we have it now, if anything had gone wrong with plant cross-breeds there was less likelihood of it spreading as easy as it is now.


And you don't think plant-breeding goes on on a massive scale today?
(sorry, just re-read your post and I see that you did not say that anywhere - my bad. I won't edit it so as people can hopefully appreciate the scale on which selective breeding goes on today)

Most genetic manipulation today is still done the good old fashioned way, since GM is a very expensive procedure that requires substantial resources to get good results.

Traditional breeding is going on at a more massive scale than it ever was, and it certainly dwarfs the GM created hybrid industry in all aspects:


Source


Source


Source


Source

I don't think the argument that there would be substantially less chance of something bad getting out in the past holds much water. Once it's out it's out, and there's no easy way to stop it.

The bottom line is that this goes on in the wild every day, on a scale much greater that we could ever hope to achieve. If anyone is going to create a 'Frankenstein monster' by accident, it will be nature and not us, and she has created many... just look around!

[edit on 22-2-2009 by C.H.U.D.]



posted on Feb, 22 2009 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by Avarus
 


This isn't necessarily a bad thing.


It simply is what it is.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 01:26 PM
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More on Monsanto -

www.globalresearch.ca...



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by spinkyboo
 


Thank you. I saw a couple of other links you posted on the Yahoo-sourced thread. Share those too, K?

People need to understand what is being 'played' with in the name of commerce.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


Gladly!

Here are a few more. It is a REAL problem...
The kind no one talks about - until it is too late.

www.globalresearch.ca...

www.responsibletechnology.org...

www.earthtimes.org...

waronyou.com...

www.worldwatch.org...



What is really going on here - and why were we not told about any of this?



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