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"Extinct" Bird Seen, Eaten

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posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 05:46 PM
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Why don't they clone the little fella?

Then they can start a franchise called Manila Fried Quail.




posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by Alxandro
 


LOl ok I couldn't help but laugh at that.

My dark humorous thought is, if they knew it was the last one, would they have charged more?

How much did they get for that thing anyways?



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by Alxandro
 


Although cloning would seem like an ideal solution for an extremely rare species, it wouldn't workout in the long run. Genetic diversity is extremely important in the survival of an organism in the wild. Within years, this bird could catch a disease and since all the the cloned birds would share the same DNA, they would all die out from it. It would take many years and generations for mutations to occur in the DNA to make them genetically diverse.

It's a sad fact but in choosing what to conserve, genetic diversity plays a huge role in the survival of an organism.



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 08:50 PM
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reply to post by grover
 


Hope it tasted good!



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 09:02 PM
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Originally posted by pteridine
When we artificially save a species, for whatever reason, what are the unintended consequences? Will the species we save prevent another from developing?

How do you know that new species will develop?

Can you supply a list of all the new species that have developed in the last one hundred years?

There are lots of animals that can be listed on the extinct list, that died out within the past one hundred years.

[edit on 24-2-2009 by tezzajw]



posted on Feb, 24 2009 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by Dances With Angels
 


Thanks for the reply, but what if you somehow combine the DNA of this rare bird with that of a closely known and more common relative.
Won't this compensate for the lack of diversity you mention?

Maybe mix it with 3 or 4 similar birds, then ever so slowly breed these A, B, C and D offspring with each other.



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