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2500 languages face extinction

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posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:59 PM
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2500 languages face extinction


www.news.com.au

THE world has lost Manx in the Isle of Man, Ubykh in Turkey and last year Alaska's last native speaker of Eyak, Marie Smith Jones, died, taking the aboriginal language with her.

Of the 6900 languages spoken in the world, some 2500 are endangered, the UN's cultural agency UNESCO said today as it released its latest atlas of world languages.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:59 PM
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It's an interesting article. I didn't think that there would be so many languages and dialects.

Progress can't be stopped and as long as people migrate, there will inevitably be some languages which give way to the majority. I blame the jet-plane! It makes globe-trotting that much easier, blending cultures and people together. Even when they're not ready to be mixed.

On a related note. I remember back in Primary School doing a simple task. We had to name a few American Indian tribes (Apache, etc...), which we knew from cowboy and indian movies. Then we had to do the same for Australian Aboriginal tribes. We could barely think of ANY!

It showed how ignorance of a culture, even our own native cultures, was so easy to achieve. No wonder the people and languages die out.

www.news.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 03:46 PM
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The aim of preserving our knowledge of languages is noble but trying to keep them “alive”, as in trying to make people speak them as a primary or language, is an exercise in futility imo.

If a certain language is easier to learn and communicate in then so be it, trying to force people to speak a certain language or dialect goes beyond cultural preservation and becomes linguistic retardation. If a language dies, then it dies, as long as the knowledge is kept to translate historic writings, songs etc I see no reason to worry.

It’s not like our modern languages haven’t change beyond recognition over the past few hundred years.



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