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Dark side of the moon.

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posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 01:48 AM
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reply to post by RFBurns
 

Iapetus [is] tidally locked to Saturn but I wasn't aware of any asymmetric cratering (I am aware of the albedo difference). The photo you attached all looks pretty well pockmarked to me.

There is no doubt that the maria are vast lava fields. There is also evidence of vulcanism not related to the maria (Gruithuisen dome among others) on the near side. There is question about why the near side was more active than the far side, but not that it was.

The theory relating to tidal forces goes back to the giant impact theory. After the Moon had coalesced from the disk of debris left from the impact, tidal forces caused more fluid materials to be concentrated on the near side. This enabled volcanic activity to continue longer on the near side.

Since the proposed flip-flop is thought to have occurred 4 billion years ago it presents no problems with the volcanic explanation for the asymmetry in cratering. Since the maria are aged at 1 to 3.5 billion years they would have formed after the flip. In other words, after the flip the near side was still more active than the far side (even though it used to be the far side). The theory does present problems for the tidal explanation for the asymmetry of the vulcanism though.

[edit on 2/19/2009 by Phage]




posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 01:55 AM
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Originally posted by Anonymous ATS
reply to post by cropmuncher
 



Our schools have been failing kids for years. Here is just ANOTHER proof of that fact.....

I'm SO glad I don't have kids.....



Listen to you all anonymous like, my school days ended long ago mate



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:00 AM
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Originally posted by Erasurehead
reply to post by M157yD4wn
 


New moon is the same side of the moon that you can see during a full moon. Because of the way the moon rotates around the earth the same side of the moon is always pointed towards earth during all phases.

The dark side is actually known as the far side of the moon and is permanently turned away from the earth. It was not seen by humans until the Apollo missions in the 1960s.

Peace.


Now this is what i thought originally and have always believed to be true - until i asked a question about craters on the side of the moon facing us on another site. I was then told by someone claiming to be in the know that their is no such thing as the dark side of the moon and that we get to see all of it over a month & so this is why i asked the question.



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:19 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


We cant leave out the inertia of the orbit of the moon itself, which would also have an effect on any lava material flowing on the surface and from within.

Iapetus is tidaly locked, but look at how far its orbit is from Saturn. That tidal lock would have very little effect on a moon...(alledged something else too)...with that large of an orbit, tilted at a 15 degree angle to the plane of the other moons around Saturn, and the outermost of all the moons that orbit Saturn.

I see the theory's point, but what I dont see is that being applicable to just one side having increased crater impacts vs the other. At a distance, the side facing Earth is smooth as a baby's butt, as can be seen in the photo you posted, and the other side having far more craters. even with lava filling in these craters on the side we do see, there would still be evidence of as many craters as there is on the side we do not see from the Earth.

Lets look at a planet that has this same issue of concentrated impact craters..Mars.





In the center extending evenly in all directions to the north, south, east and west, you can clearly see the concentrated impact craters compared to elsewhere on the map. Mars is certianly not tidal locked to anything, yet here is the same issue of concentrated impact craters.


Cheers!!!!

[edit on 19-2-2009 by RFBurns]



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:20 AM
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Some good replies there folks - thanks

Nice photo phage!

Also good pic their rf, kind of looks like a walnut - i wonder if that seam around it is an eqautor similar to ours ( not sure if other planets or moons have them though ).

As for the crater issue wouldnt the near side have less because the earth obscures it somewhat from anything impacting directly into it? It could be hit all over the nearside from angles but the farside is fullty exposed.



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:21 AM
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Although the question has already been answered the general confusion reminds me of a discussion I had with somebody at work, they were certain the moon didn't rotate, they said that the same side always faces us and so it does not rotate, I tried to explain that the same side always faces us because it rotates to do so but he wouldn't believe me. The thing is he claimed he was taught this at school, I cant help but think they glossed other the truth a little for simplicities sake.



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:28 AM
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Originally posted by cropmuncher
Some good replies there folks - thanks

As for the crater issue wouldnt the near side have less because the earth obscures it somewhat from anything impacting directly into it? It could be hit all over the nearside from angles but the farside is fullty exposed.


No the Moon does rotate, it only seems like it does not rotate to us on Earth because of the tidal lock. But it is in fact rotating on its own axis if you were to view it from a point in space follwing it as it orbits Earth.

That would mean the whole surface would be exposed to impacts.


Cheers!!!!



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:33 AM
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reply to post by RFBurns
 

Hi rf, i probably didnt put that very well as it was just a thought but i know what you mean about the moon rotating if viewed from a fixed point on space - cmr



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:33 AM
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reply to post by RFBurns
 


The moon rotates. It rotates at the rate of one rotation per revolution around the Earth (about 28 days). If it did not rotate we would be able to see its entire surface over the space of a month.



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:35 AM
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reply to post by Erasurehead
 


Yeah good point when are those Japanese images going to be released?
The world demands action!
There I even stomped my foot as I type that!
I wont do the holding my breath thing last time I passed out and nobody noticed



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:47 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


You would think that both the japanese and the indians would release there images as they are quite major achievments for those countries yet we see little to nothing. I wonder how much NASA has to do with this?

Esp considering that india was offered a new initiative on nuclear technology sharing from the USA about a week before there mission.

I would like to think that China would release images when they go to the moon but i dare say they will keep those a secret too.



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:55 AM
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That's just too creepy
I'm sure if there was nothing to hide they would be selling all kinds of awesome looking pics I mean who wouldn't want to make some extra $$$$
There has to be a reason.



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:57 AM
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To the best of my understanding is it not true that we in the UK would see a portion of the moon that say the west coast of america dont see and vice versa thus there is no dark side of the mood other than from one single perspective, so essentially if you travel the world then you would get the chance to see the "dark" side of the moon or at least some of it.



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 03:09 AM
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reply to post by cropmuncher
 


HI CMR..no worries.


Gonna go visit the dark side of the room for a bit and get some rest...zzzzz



Cheers!!!!



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 03:22 AM
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Originally posted by GobbledokTChipeater
reply to post by cropmuncher
 


While the whole of the moon sees sun at some point in its cycle, the earth only ever sees one side of the moon.

So while there isn't actually a 'dark' side, there is a side that we never see from earth.


no that's wrong.. there's actually an area of the moon's surface in the shape of an orange slice.. from pole to pole on the reverse.. that NEVER gets direct sunlight..
they've just released images of it.


-



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 03:43 AM
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The Japanese satellite has returned information on the far side of the moon. The information has been turned into a Gravity Map. It's a good article with just one glaring flaw. If anyone can guess what it is, please write back!

Further to what RFBurns and Phage were saying the evidence indicates...


Most of the large craters on the Moon formed more than 3.8 billion years ago. These were partly filled in by magma that flowed on the surface before the Moon cooled and its geological activity died down. But a number of craters also seem to have been filled in from below.

Researchers believe material from the mantle also rose up in craters, since these are sites where impacts had thinned the Moon's crust. The new Kaguya measurements reveal some craters on the far side that seem to have been filled only with mantle. These craters have higher-than-normal gravity at the centre, surrounded by a thick ring of low gravity that closely matches the original low elevation of the crater.


The article concludes by noting that there are other differences between near and far sides...

he Moon's two halves also show other striking differences. NASA's Lunar Prospector, which operated in the late 1990s, found that radioactive elements seem to be concentrated on the near side. The far side also shows less evidence of past volcanic activity.
New Scientist



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 05:58 AM
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reply to post by cropmuncher
 


"Tidal forces between Earth and the Moon have slowed the moon's rotation so that the same side is always facing the Earth. The other face, which is never visible from the Earth in its entirety (18% of it can be seen under some conditions, see Tidal locking), is therefore called the "far side of the Moon"".

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 06:10 AM
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reply to post by watchZEITGEISTnow
 


"The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency(JAXA) launched "KAGUYA (SELENE)" by the H-IIA Launch Vehicle at 10:31:01 a.m. on September 14, 2007 (JST) from Tanegashima Space Center. The major objectives of the "KAGUYA" mission are to obtain scientific data of the lunar origin and evolution and to develop the technology for the future lunar exploration. "KAGUYA" consists of a main orbiting satellite at about 100km altitude and two small satellites (Relay Satellite and VRAD Satellite) in polar orbit. The orbiters will carry instruments for scientific investigation of the Moon, on the Moon, and from the Moon."

Check out the JAXA/Kauyga LRS:Lunar Radar Sounder results, however JAXA and NASA is in a combined effort on this project, whatever that means.

wms.selene.jaxa.jp...



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 07:37 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Isn't the tidal locking the same reason for the Moon slowly moving away from the earth or am I incorrect in that statement?



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by AlienCarnage
 


Yes. Tidal locking causes the Moons orbital velocity to decrease, raising its orbit. It sounds contradictory but that's the way orbital mechanics work.
curious.astro.cornell.edu...




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