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Sirius censored in Google Earth Sky-View

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posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 03:53 AM
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If you have the latest version of Google Earth.. open it and click into Sky mode.. so you can see the stars.. then go type into the location field.. "sirius" and go there... do you get the image of Sirius cut out? its a big orange block graphic?

anyone else get this?

[img]
[/img]

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posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 05:59 AM
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Just checked, I get that too. Very odd :S



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 05:59 AM
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Yeah, I'm defenitely getting that big orange censor as well.. You know this is REALLLYY weird as I've just began reading "The Lost Star" by Walter Cruttenden.

I think I remember pulling Sirius up on Google Sky before and it not looking like this, however I can't be sure.. I'm going to check another source quick..

And with that thread of the apparent 'objects' behind the sun in those photos this is a bug out! Will be following up..

Cheers, ryan



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 06:10 AM
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Hmm I just tested this out to conform or deny if I was having a problem and that orange blob is in the way for me as well. Then I started to search around Google sky and found that, their are a variety of other things that are blocked in the midst of the sky as well such as:


Degrees are -5 Degrees 24' 24.8" (At least I think that's right). Though I did try in the infrared and microwave to see if there was anyway to get past it, but not so I'm guessing google sky just doesn't have an updated picture perhaps
?



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 06:11 AM
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man thats weird what could be the reason for that...? who knows??



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 06:35 AM
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Ok well, I looked into this a little bit. I found no sites that offer up to date images of the Sirius Star.

However, I did find an article from a blog site that had posted the image of the censored out Sirius star. The article dates back to August 2007.

googlesystem.blogspot.com...



But this is somewhat alarming, Sirius is a VERY important star! We have the right to view it!! Especially with 2012 approaching, some believe Sirius will have a role to play in whatever happens.. and I can't even find the forum I was reading yesterday right now... sigh.. It'll turn up and i'll post it. Btw, the image is also censored on MS Telescope.


{EDIT}
This is also a duplicate thread
..
www.abovetopsecret.com...
{EDIT}
Cheers,
Ryan


[edit on 18-2-2009 by ryanlv]



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 07:26 AM
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Esoteric schools are expecting the "Chintamanti stone" to come to us from the Dog Star of Sirius.
To bless us with immortality and bring in a global world order.....

www.bibliotecapleyades.net...

freaky deaky baby

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posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 06:41 PM
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here's a relatively good picture of the sirius star for those who would like to see what it looks like behind the orange paper cut-out used to block it off of google earth...
images.google.com...://www.sirianrevelations.net/images/star_a_B.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.sirianrevelations.net/star_a_b.shtml& usg=__PyODTxAWj17NSbhfdQOxIKaO3XI=&h=237&w=395&sz=15&hl=en&start=20&um=1&tbnid=2837O-aenexahM:&tbnh=74&tbnw=124&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dsirius%2Bstar%26um% 3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN

anyone else think that sirius is a sun for a very far-off planet that contains life forms...?



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by prevenge
 


Why does the helix nebula look like the Morning Glory pool?



Because they are the same thing.

Bummer you can't find a picture of the morning glory pool directly over head....anywhere!! All pics you will find are from the side, but if you had a direct over head you can lay this over the helix nebula perfectly, because the helix nebula is the morning glory pool.

Peace



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 07:15 PM
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what do you mean they're the same thing?

one's a massive collection of gasses light years away

the other is a hole in the ground that is filled with hot water.


just because two things have distinctly parallel visual characteristics, doesn't mean they're the same thing.

these are things we learn in kindergarten.

thanks for pointing it out for me though.
i hadn't known about the morning glory pool before.


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jra

posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 07:20 PM
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Originally posted by letthereaderunderstand
Bummer you can't find a picture of the morning glory pool directly over head....anywhere!! All pics you will find are from the side, but if you had a direct over head you can lay this over the helix nebula perfectly, because the helix nebula is the morning glory pool.


How do you know that the Morning glory pool matches the Helix nebula "perfectly"? You said yourself that you can't find a photo of it from directly above, so your statement is clearly false.

Personally, I think they only looks similar at the most basic level (general shape and similar colour), but that's it. There's also the fact that many amateur astronomers have imaged the nebula themselves. So it's obviously not the Morning glory pool.


[edit on 1-3-2009 by jra]



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 07:21 PM
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Hey, yeah... why is it that not only Sirius is "censored"... but so is the ENTIRE REST OF THE UNOBSERVABLE UNIVERSE!?

WE HAVE A RIGHT TO VIEW IT!!!

DAMN YOU GOOGLE SPACE!!!



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 07:25 PM
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Originally posted by prevenge
what do you mean they're the same thing?

one's a massive collection of gasses light years away

the other is a hole in the ground that is filled with hot water.


just because two things have distinctly parallel visual characteristics, doesn't mean they're the same thing.



Rofl


That was hilarious.

But seriously, Im assuming there's a problem with the software or there is an issue with the data packages, which is nothing unusual for google tools. Would be best to check other sites which offer the same thing as google sky mode does



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 07:34 PM
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Here is a great image of Sirius AND Sirius B, its small companion star, as taken by Hubble:
www.innovations-report.de...


This Hubble Space Telescope image shows Sirius A, the brightest star in our nighttime sky, along with its faint, tiny stellar companion, Sirius B. Astronomers overexposed the image of Sirius A [at centre] so that the dim Sirius B [tiny dot at lower left] could be seen. The cross-shaped diffraction spikes and concentric rings around Sirius A, and the small ring around Sirius B, are artifacts produced within the telescope’s imaging system. The two stars revolve around each other every 50 years. Sirius A, only 8.6 light-years from Earth, is the fifth closest star system known


[edit on 1-3-2009 by ProfEmeritus]



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 07:49 PM
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Originally posted by ProfEmeritus
Here is a great image of Sirius AND Sirius B, its small companion star, as taken by Hubble:
www.innovations-report.de...


This Hubble Space Telescope image shows Sirius A, the brightest star in our nighttime sky, along with its faint, tiny stellar companion, Sirius B. Astronomers overexposed the image of Sirius A [at centre] so that the dim Sirius B [tiny dot at lower left] could be seen. The cross-shaped diffraction spikes and concentric rings around Sirius A, and the small ring around Sirius B, are artifacts produced within the telescope’s imaging system. The two stars revolve around each other every 50 years. Sirius A, only 8.6 light-years from Earth, is the fifth closest star system known


[edit on 1-3-2009 by ProfEmeritus]



right right..
but what we're looking for is an up to date image.
I don't know when that image was taken.
google earth imagery is constantly updated.
the sirius censor/graphic artifact has been that way for two years.

if you look at sirius in the night sky, it's the most interesting star (to me at least) because it flashes like a siren light red and green
i've never noticed it do this before recent months.

i just want to see a very new image of it.
guess we'll leave it up to our fellow amateur astronomers with their telescopes to snap a few recent pics and post them.

and by recent i mean now.

and yeah.. it's the same artifact image in all the major sky viewing software packages.. maybe they get their image from the same source?

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posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by prevenge
 



I don't know when that image was taken. google earth imagery is constantly updated. the sirius censor/graphic artifact has been that way for two years.


The image of my house on Google Earth is three years old. Why would you expect an image of a star (which basically never changes) to be updated "regularly".

You can find the sources of all of Google Sky's images here:
earth.google.com...

Sirius looks just as spectacular to me as I always remember it looking.

On many winter nights, the air shimmers with high-altitude turbulence, making Sirius twinkle with vivid flashes of color: red, green, yellow, orange, blue. Binoculars show this especially clearly. These colorful twinkles, of course, have nothing to do with the star itself, which is 8.6 light-years away. The tiny temperature ripples causing them may be no more than a few thousand feet from your eyes.
www.boston.com...

[edit on 3/1/2009 by Phage]



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by prevenge
 





and yeah.. it's the same artifact image in all the major sky viewing software packages.. maybe they get their image from the same source?


Sirius is so BRIGHT that if a time-exposure was taken of it, and surrounding stars, one of two things would happen:

1.)A proper time-exposure for Sirius, would leave all other stars in the area, except other very bright stars, invisible.

2.)A proper time exposure for much dimer stars, would leave a very large white blob whiting out close stars.

I believe they probably put a filter or mask over Sirius.



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by ryanlv
 


Sirius is a VERY important star! We have the right to view it!!

Indeed you have.

Go out into the garden on a clear night, find Orion's belt, then look along a line slightly more south than west of it.

Sirius is the brightest star in the night sky, so you should have no problem finding it.

So much for your rights.

You have no right to look through somebody else's telescope or demand photos from somebody else's camera. You have the right to view images in the public domain, but it is up to you to find them. Nobody is obliged to show them to you.



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 10:49 PM
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Sirius could be a portal to another world...........

Then again maybe not.

But I wear my sunglasses at night................



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 10:50 PM
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Originally posted by Astyanax

So much for your rights.

You have no right to look through somebody else's telescope or demand photos from somebody else's camera. You have the right to view images in the public domain, but it is up to you to find them. Nobody is obliged to show them to you.


Strong sentiments, whY????





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