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Los Angeles nears water rationing

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posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 02:23 AM
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Los Angeles nears water rationing


www.reuters.com

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - With a recent flurry of winter storms doing little to dampen California's latest drought, the nation's biggest public utility voted on Tuesday to impose water rationing in Los Angeles for the first time in nearly two decades.

Under the plan adopted in principle by the governing board of the L.A. Department of Water and Power, homes and businesses would pay a penalty rate -- nearly double normal prices -- for any water they use in excess of a reduced monthly allowance.

The five-member board plans to formally vote on details of the measure next month.

The rationing scheme is expected to take effect in May unless the City Council acts before then to reject it -- a move seen as unlikely since Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa called for the measure under a water-shortage plan last week.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 02:23 AM
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Wow, water rationing. Compile this sort of thing on top of California's other problems and you have yourself a very bad situation. Water rationing could seriously hurt an already unstable economy. It just seems like everything is hitting all at once. Las Vegas has been losing water very rapidly as well from Lake Mead, and the flow of the Colorado River has decreased due to demand. Nevada also allocates water to southern California

www.reuters.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 02:40 AM
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Seems to me like they should have allocated a few billion to Desalination plants. That would really help us out.

I really hope Cali can get their crap together. If they go under then that will be the ripple that sets off everything else.



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 02:44 AM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 


California is definitely a first domino deal, but the worst of it is tied up in other places. Any one thing going horribly wrong can set the whole world into a tailspin. Derivatives, CDS(ongoing), second wave of foreclosures in commercial real estate, Eastern Europe. Anything.



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 02:48 AM
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Eh.

We Aussies have been under water rationing in many states for over a decade now. You'll get used to it, it's not as bad as it sounds.....that's of course unless nobody follows the rules and you run out of water.



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 02:53 AM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


Man talk about a Financial mine field. Spending all this cash and not allocating it to the right places could cause everything to go.

Back on topic, Cali is in a really bad position. We could possibly see the collapse of the Californian political system.

Water rationing, on top of people getting back IOU's for their taxes and the fact they can't pass a budget and the Governator is threatening to lay off 20000 state employees is a recipe for disaster.



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 02:55 AM
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Well, welcome to my world projectvxn.

Victoria here in Australia has been under water restrictions for a few years now, and Perth and Adelaide have been under water restrictions for almost 10 years. Its no big deal, it wont damage things any further than what they already are.

Just make sure you follow the rules and use it sparingly.....for instance, instead of using sprinklers on your garden, use the hose, its far less water


Be smart with your water usage mate



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 03:08 AM
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reply to post by OzWeatherman

 


Being in Northern Nevada I don't have to deal with their water problems. But I used to live in Las Vegas, and the exponential growth of Southern Nevada has actually cause enough of a strain on the resources of Southern Nevada that for the first time in 16 years people are leaving.

I lived there when the population was 600,000 by the time I left no one had noticed the second million and a half.




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