It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Pakistan Makes a Taliban Truce, Creating a Haven

page: 5
25
<< 2  3  4    6  7 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 06:21 PM
link   
For those who haven't seen what Swat looks like or possible looked like before this is all said and done it may never be the same again.






posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 06:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by freeradical
 


Great point if Pakistan goes down the tubes so much for nuclear containment!
What I don't get is why we are not getting even more international support outside of all the Anti America flag burning people must see and understand what really is at stake here?



They see what is at stake from their own perspective, the "war is bad for people and other living things" mentality. They would rather live on their knees than die on their feet, and will be the first to pay the jizyah tax and willingly enter dhimmitude.

nenothtu out



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 06:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by SLAYER69
reply to post by Jay-in-AR
 


The war in Iraq is pretty much over the Iraqis themselves will have to deal with the issues of Iraq.


The iraqi's themselves will have to deal with the fact that your country was responsible for the murder of thousands of dead infants, women, children and innocent men.

And you're comment about the french was ignorant at best. The French at least stand up against their government, so stick your heartless, stereotypical ideology and learn some manners.



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 06:40 PM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


That looks like a beautiful place indeed.

As you say, how long before it's a wasteground?



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 06:47 PM
link   

Originally posted by mr-lizard

And you're comment about the french was ignorant at best. The French at least stand up against their government, so stick your heartless, stereotypical ideology and learn some manners.


I'll do no such thing thanks!

As far as our British and Canadian cousins atleast they have what it takes to get into the mix.
Canadian Army in action

British Army Fights Taliban!



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 07:01 PM
link   


The war for Afghanistan is increasingly being staged from across the Pakistani border. Although Pakistan's government claims to support the US, it is reluctant to take on the Taliban in tribal areas.





posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 07:35 PM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


I'm British (yeah does that disrupt your reality a little? Someone from England defending the french?)

NOT everyone agreed with those wars, and some of those countries that disagreed got roped into those wars any way.

Do NOT assume that those who didn't are cowards.



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 07:58 PM
link   
reply to post by mr-lizard
 


My You seem to be the one making assumptions my friend



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 08:15 PM
link   
Just had a spontaneous question arise while reading this thread...

It seems that a full on Taliban / Pakistan assault is an eventuality. Now, if this had occurred 8 years ago, would Iraq have allied with us, Afghanistan/Pakistan, or remained neutral? I'm trying to grasp a strategic reason for disrupting Iraq's military/government (rather then the pure financial end results).



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 08:23 PM
link   
reply to post by thomasblackraven
 




The Great Game Revisited
The strategic and economic importance of the Caucasus and Central Asia remains unchanged despite the global slowdown.

How will the interplay between historical and emerging powers as well as old and new interests reshape the future of the region?

Ilham Aliyev, President of Azerbaijan
Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Prime Minister of Turkey
Serzh A. Sargsyan, President of Armenia

Chaired by
Ian Bremmer, President, Eurasia Group, USA; Young Global Leader



[edit on 17-2-2009 by SLAYER69]



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 08:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by thomasblackraven
Just had a spontaneous question arise while reading this thread...

It seems that a full on Taliban / Pakistan assault is an eventuality. Now, if this had occurred 8 years ago, would Iraq have allied with us, Afghanistan/Pakistan, or remained neutral? I'm trying to grasp a strategic reason for disrupting Iraq's military/government (rather then the pure financial end results).


Saddam would of shown solidarity with Pakistan. In the same way Chavez shows solidarity with Iran. I wouldn't really be surprised if Saddam and Chavez had solidarity. It wouldn't be an alliance though.



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 11:01 PM
link   
[edit on 17-2-2009 by SLAYER69]



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 06:59 AM
link   
Can't remember who else said it but this is the first I've heard of this and to be completely honest it kinda put a grin on my face..

We've been chasing shadows for a while and I dunno.. it just feels like this is one big set up to get the majority of the Taliban in one place that'll just get absolutely decimated. Don't know why I just feel it..



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 07:03 AM
link   

Originally posted by spitefulgod
reply to post by solidshot
 

Seriously though the Asians are so violent, maybe them and the chavs can wipe themselves out if it all kicks off.



Please dont sully an entire continent by generalizing based on the one donkey in the midst of horses.



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 10:03 AM
link   
Historically speaking (during modern times anyway) the whole region of Afghan/Pakistan has been a cultural backwater, one that came (like much of the Mid-Eastern Islamic world) to deeply resent the west's (aka European/American) meddling in their affairs and their leaders (of the 1950's and 60's) trying to drag their society into the modern world. This was a pan-Islamic movement that included Egypt under Nassur... the Baath parties of Syria and Iraq, Iran under the Shah and Pakistan under various leaders. The attempts to secularize what was traditonally a theocratic society led to the funnymentalist backlash. Add to this the U.S. Meddling in their political affairs fueled by oil and the cold war and the whole Arab/Israeli conflict and the seeds of today were sown. A good book that discusses this whole issue is Tariq Ali's 2001 book "The Clash of Fundamentalisms"

Any rate war or futher war is not the answer... engagement is but how to begin is a prickly issue. But the use of continued firepower will do little but to push more of the citizens of this region into the Al Qaeda/Taliban camp and since that would be very dangerous indeed.



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 10:17 AM
link   
reply to post by grover
 

The New Great Game?
Wiki


The Great Game was a term used for the strategic rivalry and conflict between the British Empire and the Russian Empire for supremacy in Central Asia. The classic Great Game period is generally regarded as running approximately from the Russo-Persian Treaty of 1813 to the Anglo-Russian Convention of 1907. Following the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 a second, less intensive phase followed.

The term "The Great Game" is usually attributed to Arthur Conolly, an intelligence officer of the British East India Company's Sixth Bengal Light Cavalry.[1] It was introduced into mainstream consciousness by British novelist Rudyard Kipling in his novel Kim (1901).







[edit on 18-2-2009 by SLAYER69]



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 10:25 AM
link   
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


That is why I said the west aka European/American.

Examples abound as to why we are so hated there ranging from all but rip off deals regarding oil in the 30's and 40's to the reinstatement of the Shah by the CIA to the all but habitual overthrowing of duly elected governments in Pakistan if they did not fit our goals.



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 10:34 AM
link   
reply to post by grover
 


Oh I hear ya I'm just throwing that out there so people can get a full picture also we are in " The game " now there is no backing out at this point. As you mentioned earlier it's a prickly situation but if we can remove the Taliban and Qaida then we can go about doing good things



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 10:53 AM
link   
Does anyone know how India feels about this? I don't know too much about this subject, but isn't this also a great problem for India too?

What can anyone do about it now? I don't think it's a reality to have the US invade Pakistan. That will never happen i my opinion.

This is what I'm starting to see:

Maybe, the people who run the gov (and gov's of other parts of the world) have seen this coming and they know there's nothing anyone can do anymore. That's why they took all of their money out of the market, that's why the US and most other world economies have gone bust.

Didn't the beginning of the crash occur about the same time Musharraf stepped down?



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 11:30 AM
link   
reply to post by Electro38
 


India feels that the US must clear up its mess viz. Pakistan.

The US has been propping up the Pak government for the past 50 years with arms, aid and on one occasion even military support against India.

Twice India has come close to defeating Pakistan entirely in war (of course defeat is impossible eventually since Pakistan will just throw their nukes towards India). The first time was in '71 when India pushed back the Pakistani army on both sides of the north, caused the surrender of 91,000 Pakistani soldiers and blockaded Karachi. Pakistan later revealed they were 6 days away from capitulation. How did they escape it? The US sent in a warship to threaten India into stopping.

The same thing happened in 99 with Kargil. Pakistan had less than a week's supply of oil left and Clinton forced India to stop.

The US got the call catastrophically wrong. Simply to counter Soviet friendliness with India, they supported the nation of Pakistan. Its presposterous because as we all probably know now, the majority of international terrorists are in fact Pakistani (75%).

This is the reality on the ground. Pakistanis hate Americans, virulently. They don't care about the billions of dollars in military hardware you give them, or the aid etc.



It is well and truly time for the USA to face their biggest mistake . on. You nurtured a monster which has sucked your blood (and ours) for the past half century and which now attempts to bite your hand off; and you simultaneously slapped the face of a country which extended its hand of friendship unilaterally to all those who didnt want realpolitik.

Its time for Obama to deliver on his promise of cracking down on Pakistan. Its time for the US to clean up your mess. We didn't cause it, but yet we will help you.

With all respect, and full honesty, that is what India thinks.



new topics

top topics



 
25
<< 2  3  4    6  7 >>

log in

join