It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Aust.Aboriginal Stone constuction.

page: 1
3
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 07:12 PM
link   
G'day all.

I was just doing a search on the Victorian bush-fires,and i came across this page.
(I did a quick search of the site and i don't think this subject has been touched on.)

www.abc.net.au...

It brushes on permanent aboriginal settlement of a particular area,and i thought since not much is said about this,i thought i'd put it out there.


Peace.

[edit on 16-2-2009 by Cygnus_Hunter]




posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 07:26 PM
link   
reply to post by Cygnus_Hunter
 


Quite the bonzer there CH

I wonder if that site might have been seasonal and not permanent?



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 07:30 PM
link   
Not real sure Hanslune.
Im' trying to find the page i was reading the other day that discusses the flirtation with permanent settlement and rudimentary crop planting.

Peace.

[edit on 16-2-2009 by Cygnus_Hunter]

[edit on 16-2-2009 by Cygnus_Hunter]



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 08:28 PM
link   
reply to post by Cygnus_Hunter
 


If I remember my Botany bay history didn't a few of the native adapt to a more European point of culture? This might be a relic of those times?

I remember reading a book on this, "When the sky fell" by Wiley? It mentioned some aborgines who were adopted or otherwise associated with the British. Some adopted more European ways. Perhaps a missionary effort?



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 09:05 PM
link   
I think your right there Hanslune,after a few years the aboriginal population around Botany Bay,did set up semi-permanent camps for the purposes of trading goods.
( something that they did with he other aboriginal nations for years)

This ruined habitation was found in the state next to New South Wales,Victoria.
The article quotes that the site is dated to 8000 years ago.

I'm no expert on the anthropological history of the indigenous peoples of Australia.But if the date can be authenticated,this could go along way to dispel some of the myths of Pre-European colonization.

Peace.



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 09:09 PM
link   
reply to post by Cygnus_Hunter
 


Yes it would. I wonder how they came up with that date?



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 09:16 PM
link   
Its got me how they settled on the date.
I'm going to do a little more digging and see if there are any published papers on this.

(And here i was just trying to find a little more indepth info on the Victorian bush-fires)



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 09:29 PM
link   
www.monash.edu.au...

www.abc.net.au...

Just some more links on the subject.



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 09:52 PM
link   
reply to post by Cygnus_Hunter
 


Howdy CH

Yes those links made it a lot clearer. I must have misread the first link I got the impression that the stone huts were found only because of the fire




Professor Kershaw is conducting a parallel study to Dr Builth's, analysing cores extracted from swamp and lake sediment to determine when and why the landscape was modified.


From that they probably got the C-14 dates. All very cool, add another small settled culture to the pot!



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 10:05 PM
link   
I'm a bit confused about some of the theories expressed here. Europeans only settled in Australia in 1788 -- that's around 220 years ago. So if the houses were deemed to be 8,000 years old how could they have copied European culture?



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 10:19 PM
link   
reply to post by Fahrenheit451
 


They wouldn't have. Initially I thought they had just found the houses and claimed a date of 8,000 years, Hunter has provided additional links to show that instead of new find their has been a study underway for some time and they have solid dates.

So I was speculating without correct data.....I shall spend the night in a pit of itchy leaves to redeem my honor.



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 11:25 PM
link   
This find dates back before the fires of "06".I'm not sure on the field research dates though. From what i can gather,they settled on the 8000 number from dating the aquaculture finds in the surrounding marshes (?)
(edit : The marshes were drained by the European settlers)

As i said before im no expert,just glad that we could discuss this.

[edit on 16-2-2009 by Cygnus_Hunter]

[edit on 16-2-2009 by Cygnus_Hunter]



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 11:49 PM
link   
Sorry Hans,

I really should have researched a bit more and pasted a few more links in my first post.



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 12:00 AM
link   
reply to post by Cygnus_Hunter
 


Ahh that's okay, I'm married and am use to being wrong.



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 11:52 AM
link   
Very interesting find!

I hadn't read much on the Australian Aborigines... it's interesting that they had permanent villages and shelters. So much of their history has been damaged by the attitude that they "looked like animals" and therefore were "sub human" and couldn't have had much culture (a rant for another time and place.)

The aquaculture, though -- that would make them the first civilized group of people to develop such technology, if memory serves.



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 03:35 PM
link   
Hiya Byrd.

As an immigrant from Britain,basically we were taught that the Aborigine's of Australia roamed aimlessly around chucking spears at things.
(Sort of like how us Scots like to drink vast quantities of whiskey and wear woman's clothing for the shear pleasure of it.)

Its going to take many more years to dispel the convenient lies that have built up,and add a few more to that before the Aborigines in the south of Australia regain a positive pride in themselves.

We can't be held responsible for the sins of the fathers,but we do have a duty to see that history is written properly for future generations.



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 06:07 PM
link   
If the age stands up this would fit in with Catalhoyuk and other pre/proto-civilizations.

Very interesting indeed

I do remember something from Solheim's materials - or one of his later students about fish ponds along the Mekong but I don't remember the dating but I do believe this would be the earlier aquaculture.



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 06:55 PM
link   
Brewarrina fish traps.

www.abc.net.au...

maritime.heritage.nsw.gov.au... to:%20Vince%20Scarcella

If you thought 8000 years was an eyebrow raiser,check these links out.

[edit on 18-2-2009 by Cygnus_Hunter]



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 07:01 PM
link   
reply to post by Cygnus_Hunter
 


Most impressive if supported. Will have to ask for opinions on that at another site (HOM)



posted on Feb, 18 2009 @ 07:11 PM
link   
Just updated the above post to include some pics from another site.

Not real sure if those fish traps in Brewarrina was a part of a concerted effort in sustainable aquaculture.Could be wrong but i *think*,that they were taking advantage (ie,using the contours of the river as a basis of their stone work),of the natural shallows of the river to trap the fish.

( i haven't read anything about the builders of the traps,restocking/breeding fish)



new topics

top topics



 
3
<<   2 >>

log in

join