It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Do you need a BOB ( bit of lateral thinking)

page: 1
3

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 02:22 PM
link   
I'm just chewing a few things over in my head about BOBs and the scenarios they are needed for. Being an old school Light Infantryman I have a natural aversion to carrying anything but the bare minimum of kit to get off the battlesfield alive at the end of the day. But what if we could extend that doctrine to survivalist scenarios ?

What for example if the journey to your retreat or home is more affected by tactical issues than just simple distance?. Most of us could easily walk 25 miles in 24 hours if we had to, fear or adrenalin would see to that. So if your place of safety is fully stocked and fitted out and you dont have a great distance to cover travelling light may be a better option.

Again harking back to my infantry days I also have an aversion to having things about me that can slow me down or occupy my hands more than neccessary. IE Rucksacks, Pouches etc . I like my hands free as much as possible and if things are really crappy I want them free to hold defensive weaponry, not straps or handles on luggage.

So if we think about it the average man, woman and child can survive for 24 hours with remarkably little kit, and if that kit is chosen wisely most of it can be put in the pockets of a travel vest with any tactical kit going in the pockets of your topcoat / parka/ smock/ jacket.

Think about it what you need for 24 hours to get you safely out of harms way ( again topography and geography at play here) could be your bug out clothing in gloves, hat etc. Travel vest.
Then
Knife
Multi tool,
Flashlight / spare batteries
Compass
Area 1:50,000 maps
Analogue Watch
Cell Phone
2 way radios for each member of party
Binos / field glasses
Eye glasses / shades
FAK / Field dressings
Prescription medicines
Chemical light sticks
Ration Bars/ MRE x 2
Chocolate bars
Bar soap/ baby wipes/ toothbrush
1 litre water bottle / filter straw
Plastic survival bag shelter
Micro AM/ FM radio
Spork
Paracord
Plastic bags
Blister kit
Bandana.

Basically thats it with each adult being able to carry say one piece of kit each extra like a rope, tarp, hexy / trioxane cooker, pry bar etc a small group or family can easily carry enough kit just in their pockets to sustain them on a 24 hour journey. This gives them many benefits of light weight walking, covering distance faster, less likely to attract attention etc etc. Depending on your circumstances you could leave a cache of top up supplies at some point along your route to top up from.

Not forgetting our American cousins a shoulder or hip holster with your hand gun and ammo, this leaves your hands free to carry the 40 mm seven barreled electrically driven gattling gun you folks usually feel you need to shoot at liberal, lefty, latin, communist, al quaeda supporting ground hogs with .


[edit on 16-2-2009 by Northern Raider]

[edit on 16-2-2009 by Northern Raider]




posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 03:07 PM
link   

Originally posted by Northern Raider

Not forgetting our American cousins a shoulder or hip holster with your hand gun and ammo, this leaves your hands free to carry the 40 mm seven barreled electrically driven gattling gun you folks usually feel you need to shoot at liberal, lefty, latin, communist, al quaeda supporting ground hogs with .


[edit on 16-2-2009 by Northern Raider]


Dont forget the zombies, aliens, and other "survivors" who are really just trying to steal our stuff, thats why I prefer the 40 mm gatling gun with 15 barrels (cool faster) and my armor penetrating bullets. Cant be too careful with those zombies you know.


I get what you are saying with go light to get to your bug out location quicker and with less attention. I guess its down to who you are and where you are going. For just one person trying to get out of London or NYC to some unknown area, light isnt practical, maybe for speed, but if nothing is stocked, you need all of that stuff. A family of 4? Can you imagine trying to tell an average 12 year old girl that she needs to take disaster planning seriously and have a bob ready to go?

Your family is ready for something like this, but to get the average person to simply have food stocks is hard enough, to get them convinced that everyone should be ready to roll is a different matter.

With all of that said, the items you listed would be ideal for an individual as part of a group. Not sure you need paracord twice however
and a small personal medical kit per person would be wise. Then ration out the heavy stuff per individual. One tent, one stove, one tarp, etc... If you had the right family or group of people, it would work well. Most people dont plan that far in advance, so they load up with everything they can think of. However, once a group is formed to head out, duplicates will be left behind and you will see more specialized items. Like the double barreled flame thrower Ive been reading about.



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 03:14 PM
link   
Corrected the para cord cockup
) I think the idea I am playing with is utilising the bug out travel vest and top coat combo to a higher level, naturally its only feasable in limited circumstances, IE travelling from a city centre to the outer burbs, or travelling from the industrial estate or business centre out to the dormitory town. Quite often I go out with everything stuffed into my travel vest with my EDC kit in my pants, on my belt or in my parka, and I've noticed I still have space for more kit without it looking bulky. Thats gotta be a plus if your trying to get out of town along with millions of panic stricken sheeple, IE Grey man low profile etc.
NR



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 04:08 PM
link   

Originally posted by Northern Raider
Quite often I go out with everything stuffed into my travel vest with my EDC kit in my pants, on my belt or in my parka, and I've noticed I still have space for more kit without it looking bulky. Thats gotta be a plus if your trying to get out of town along with millions of panic stricken sheeple, IE Grey man low profile etc.
NR


My work is about 40 miles from the house so my EDC is light but geared for a forced march. In the high desert here one water jug is not enough for 25 miles so I plan on at least 2 quarts.

I sold my 40mm at the gun show this weekend, getting soft talking to guys.



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 04:13 PM
link   
Good post, certainly got my grey matter working overtime. It makes me think of professional shop lifters. Heavy overcoat fitted with foil lined poachers pockets.

I prefer my EDC items in my pockets and a small 10L (approx) non descript daysack with the bare essentials to last me 24hrs +/- That lets me blend in with the sheeple.

Rgds



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 10:28 PM
link   
My "BOB" consist's of:
Tactical vest with 3 pouches for 30 rnd mags, 3 pouches for pistol mags, and a pocket for my binoculars, and internal map pocket.
a tactical assault holster with mag pouch.
a drop leg rig with a 6 30 rnd mag pouch.
2 double mag pouches for my belt.
a 6 qt hydration pouch.
a MOLLE backpack
3 knives.
multi tool.
knife sharpener.
magnesium block.
first aid kit.
50' para-cord.
50' 3/8ths inch rope.
2 changes of clothes.
3 days worth of e-rations.
a 4 inch diameter magnifying glass.
a small tarp.
gunsmithing tool kit.


It weighs about 65 pounds, and leaves my hands free for my mini-14.



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 03:11 AM
link   
[quote

My work is about 40 miles from the house so my EDC is light but geared for a forced march. In the high desert here one water jug is not enough for 25 miles so I plan on at least 2 quarts.


Theres a girl on another forum who lives outside a place called Flagstaff, She workin the the city but lives out somewhere rural, Her bug out plan in volves bugging out of town to get home by following a railroad track ( IIIRC) the distance was around 18 to 20 miles and she said the same thing as you, Not enough H") for arid conditions. BUT she was adamant she still did not want the bulk of packs and puches etc. So she has got one of those two or three litres hydration bladder thingummys with a bite tube, even full it lays very close to her back and can still wear a shirt over the top. and she says keeeping the bag in the works cooler fridge means its relly coooling on her back when she is out walking.



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 03:19 AM
link   
Yeah Dark Vengence and water doctor have gotten the thinking just about spot on. IE not only tailoring their EDCs and BOBs to suit their needs but also utilising a low profile storage system to make them blend in, fade out etc, Damn impressive chaps.

Part of my thinking comes yet again from my days as a Light Infantry Sergeant, We were always taught if for example we were stopped for a break, or resting up over night or in fixed positions and suddenly we got banjoed by the badguys in a suprise attack.We could abandon our rucksack/ webbing etc and just grab our rifles before scattering. Policy was you should still have enough kit and tools / supplies on your person to survive for at least 48 hours



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 07:46 AM
link   
I had to chuckle when I read the comment about telling your average 12 year old girl to prepare to bug out. I try to teach my kids all I can about survival, however I would be a little afraid if I had to rely on my daughter to forage, build shelter, keep us warm if I were unable to do those things. Don't get me wrong, I have faith that she could do those things, I just dont see the need to have my shelter bedazzled. (Sigh those are glue on sparklies for those that don't know.) Where I live is more rural than urban so I have a get home bag in my car. My get home bag is pretty much what everyone refers to as a BoB. If I were to "bug out" the bag I would carry is much different. More of a INCH "I'm Never Comming Home" bag. for the family, the clothing they would carry in that instance is mine. It may not fit them in style, but they will not be naked if they grow.

Spiritowl



posted on Feb, 21 2009 @ 12:41 PM
link   
hmm how about including some sort of a portable solor cooker in your list? you wouldn't need wood or fuel just sun light. Assuming you have any. I would prefer to have a flashlight that was energy effeciant where you crank it to charge it up.



posted on Feb, 21 2009 @ 08:03 PM
link   
First of all, reposting my bob contents list for informational purposes.
Its a black butpack which i wear sideways like a courier bag for comfort.
Everything is in baggies to keep organized. EDIT forgot to mention my ACU pattern camelback for hydration

Contents:
A scalpel
Scissors
Cheap survival knife with stuff inside the handle like hooks, line and sinkers also has matches. (its the back up of the back up)
2 2 way radios

Inside one baggy
2 emergency ponchos (transparent)
2 emergency space blankets
various maps of the area
tissot compass with map reader and magnifying glass
sewing kit with different threads and all types of different needles
extra AA and AAA batteries for radios and night vision
small card size sewing kit that i got at a hotel as a backup
sharpie marker (never know when you might whant to leave a message or or something like that)
Small foldable scissors as a backup
nail clippers (you cant imagine how necessary this might be)
small mirror for signaling and checking out hard to see wounds

Inside another baggy
Most of the items bellow are packed in independent small baggies

DO NOT USE ANY MEDICINES OR MEDICAL EQUIPMENT IF NOT PROPERLY TRAINED. PLEASE JUST DON'T...

Anti allergens (lots)
Pain killers (lots)
Different medicines to treat stomach illnesses
Anti spasm medicine
Anti inflammatory medicine
Iodine (no brainer)
Different types of vitamins and suplements
Other types of medicines (to many to list)
surgical clamp
angio catheter (to treat a pneumotorax; if you don't know what that it don't even attempt it...)
US army type tourniquet (the one you can apply on yourself)
Gauss
Various bandages
Cotton wads
super glue (excellent to seal arteries and other wounds HAS SERIOUS AND DANGEROUS SIDE EFFECTS DO NOT USE IF NOT ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY)
Anti bacterial/fungal cream
sun block
Surgical tape
Band aids
Cream to treat bruises and sore limbs (comes in a handy round tin)
syringe
And there's some more stuff, cant remember what... but these are the most important items.

Left side pocket
My shooting gloves

Right side pocket
70 pound test fishing line

Front pocket
2 long isolate cables rolled into tight balls
2 long non isolated cables rolled into tight balls
Small LED Flashlight
A long thin metal rope (the type that you can build a snare with)
A long rope to help me build shelter
A couple of lighters
Lock pick set (DIY)
Forgot one or 2 more things... sorry

On the strap
Gerber Mc Giver tool

On the little top straps
Night vision scope
if necessary a machete or crowbar

In my pockets
Cell phone with a flash light
Automatic knife with a small flashlight on it
Car Keys (hmm might be an important item hugh...)

OK, I'm sorry if I forgot some things but it's in my trunk right now and I'm not going out just for this post.

I also have another backpack ready to go with MRE's and some other stuff but I will only grab that one if I know I'm never coming back. Also has decent camping equipment.

Another thing I WILL NOT discuss the nature of my firearms or my ammo. Word of advice, 7.62 is your friend and never go to a gun fight with a handgun that's caliber starts with anything smaller than a 4. Shotguns rule...
Never take a knife to a gunfight but take lots of guns to a knife fight.
ALWAYS TRAIN YOUR SKILLS

OK so that's all the new knowledge that I have to give. But as for the topic, in my opinion everybody should have a bag of this nature. It's saved my ass in more than one perfectly normal situation. I like to keep mine in my trunk because I'm about 2 seconds running/gunning distance from my front door.
In any case I strongly recommend anyone to make even a basic BOB or EDC. I also recommend everyone to get even basic first aid cert, so that you have access to all the medical goodies without hurting yourself.
In my case my bug out spot is aprox 40km for where I am right now, but I can get there in about 1 hour in my car through very concealed back roads down the mountains. Basically Whats listed above plus some training and firepower should be good for 24 if each member of your team has something similar adapted to their specific skills.

But anyway, when carried under my arm like a purse and with a heavy coat or poncho on top (the weather here is like that...) it wont even raise an eyebrow. How do I know because I've actually gone out on the street with it and looked at people for reactions asked people I know if they notice anything different.

@ Northern Raider


Again harking back to my infantry days I also have an aversion to having things about me that can slow me down or occupy my hands more than neccessary. IE Rucksacks, Pouches etc . I like my hands free as much as possible and if things are really crappy I want them free to hold defensive weaponry, not straps or handles on luggage.

Same here bro... Nothing should be found between your hand and your gun. Simple life or death principle.

@ everybody, please tell me what you can correct about the items listed above.


EDIT also corrected saner to snare...
[edit on 21-2-2009 by TheDarkFlame]

[edit on 21-2-2009 by TheDarkFlame]



posted on Feb, 22 2009 @ 04:12 PM
link   
I too like the idea that its possible to live "out of your pockets" so to speak and not need to rely on a large variety of equipment. I'm sure its possible and definately can be done, look at Ray Mears; you could drop that man down on any location on the earth armed with nothing more than a knife but he would be able to catch his own food, make his own fire and shelter without a problem.

Knowledge is far more important than equipment and if you know the right methods then I'm sure you can sort yourself out by using nature rather than being dependant on equipment in your BOB.

A personal survival tin, good knowledge and some warm waterproof clothing can, in the right person, be just as effective as a rucksack being loaded with 100lb of equipment.



posted on Feb, 22 2009 @ 09:31 PM
link   

Originally posted by Death_Kron
A personal survival tin, good knowledge and some warm waterproof clothing can, in the right person, be just as effective as a rucksack being loaded with 100lb of equipment.


True, even with the best gear someone who doesn't have the necessary knowledge will find it hard to survive. Like with everything else knowledge is the key.
Any how the true survivalist will still be better off having the right equipment as a tool to help him do all those things you say. I like to live by the principle that its better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it, as improvising not always works. Common sense has to play a part in it though...




top topics



 
3

log in

join