Someone Please Explain To Me - The Theory that Jupiter Ignited - while behind the Sun right now

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posted on Feb, 1 2011 @ 07:53 PM
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reply to post by questioningall
 



members.cox.net...

Theory of how this could be possible, an ignition happening deep inside Jupiter in the summer of 2009 and the fusion reaction will cause heat convection plumes to shortly be rising to the surface. The fusion reaction would not immediately be evident unless someone pointed a neutrino detector there. Most other evidence would shortly (within a few years) be coming...

Evidence so far:

Wesley Mark was not an impact, it was a venting hole from the initiation of fusion.

The two Jupiter "flashes" were antipodes in L3!!!!!!!! This is huge evidence that an enormous electircal event has occurred that has affected the center of Jupiter!

Pu-238 IS INDEED FISSILE! That's what went in years ago...




posted on Feb, 1 2011 @ 09:48 PM
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Originally posted by Goliathan
reply to post by questioningall
 



members.cox.net...

Theory of how this could be possible, an ignition happening deep inside Jupiter in the summer of 2009 and the fusion reaction will cause heat convection plumes to shortly be rising to the surface. The fusion reaction would not immediately be evident unless someone pointed a neutrino detector there. Most other evidence would shortly (within a few years) be coming...

Evidence so far:

Wesley Mark was not an impact, it was a venting hole from the initiation of fusion.

The two Jupiter "flashes" were antipodes in L3!!!!!!!! This is huge evidence that an enormous electircal event has occurred that has affected the center of Jupiter!

Pu-238 IS INDEED FISSILE! That's what went in years ago...



This is an old thread and I'm too lazy to re-read it. What do you think happened in 2009 to "ignite" Jupiter?
Galileo was crashed in 2003. Cassini is still out there, alive and well.

Why it can't happen:
www.universetoday.com...
and
skeptoid.com...



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 12:22 PM
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The two articles you refer to as refutations completely miss and avoid the major points, here are the facts:

1) Pu-238 mix that was aboard Galileo and is aboard Cassini IS fissle, this is admitted by the IAEA.
2) 15 capsules of LWRHU's went into Jupiter aboard the Galileo probe in 1995, (as opposed to the spacecraft). They went in well-protected behind the probe's shield, therefore they survived entry, as the probe obviously survived entry.
3) These capsules did not melt, the physics shows they can fall intact for a very long time because they increase their melting point as pressures increase, this allows them to "stay ahead of the melting curve".
4) They kept falling in this manner until the 2.7 grams of Pu-dioxide inside them DID fission.
5) When fission occurs this deep into Jupiter (about 80% of the way in), fusion is assured because the temps reach into the billions Kelvin, Jupiter has the right pressure and material, it only lacks the starting temp. for fusion.
6) This happened in the summer of 2009, and we saw the gas blow-out hole from the initiation rise up to the top to be called the Wesley impact, but it did not have the signature of an impact, because it was a venting hole and NOT an impact.
7) In 2010, we saw and bipodal electrical discharge that affected the center of Jupiter, likely because the fusion reaction reached the center in May 2010.
8) This caused an ANTIPODAL discharge which was seem as massive lightning on June 3 and Aug. 20 2010, the difference of 78 days was because of distance and resistance differences and the enormous size of Jupiter. These discharges were called "impacts" but once again, they did not have the signature of impacts, because they were discharges resulting from a deep fusion reaction that had expanded to the center of Jupiter. The antipode can only be recognized if observing the flashes in L3, the internal rotation of Jupiter.

This theory is found in a new book called "The Philosopher's Stone for the Transformation of Jupiter - Project Lucifer", and can be found at Barnes and Noble Nook and Amazon Kindle. Also a video can be found introducing the book at:
members.cox.net... or at Oaklight Publishing's website.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by questioningall
 


I think the most likely scenario about planet x and the second sun (IF it's true) is staring us right in the face, and am looking at putting a thread together about it, but come on ATS think about it...



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 03:05 PM
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Originally posted by Goliathan
2) 15 capsules of LWRHU's went into Jupiter aboard the Galileo probe in 1995, (as opposed to the spacecraft). They went in well-protected behind the probe's shield, therefore they survived entry, as the probe obviously survived entry.

The probe didn't survive anything; it was sheered apart by the tremdous forces of Jupiter's atmosphere shortly after descending into it, as ultimately were the Pu-238 RTGs. It's been nearly 16 years since the probe disintegrated, the Pu-238 has long since diffused into the atmosphere never to be seen or heard from again. You cannot cause Jupiter to ignite by throwing a little fissile material at it, Jupiter doesn't have enough mass to sustain fusion. If you wanted to ignite Jupiter you would have to compress the planet or at least its inner layers by completely surrounding it and applying an astronomical amount of energy to it... and you would need to sustain that pressure to keep it going instead of being a flash in the pan. It doesn't matter whether the force comes from a massive fission explosion as in a man-made fusion bomb or from a non-nuclear force, the force requirements are the same either way. It just happens that for man, fission is the easiest way to get enough energy going in an instant of time to create fusion in a fusion bomb. Nature has ways of dealing far more energy to Jupiter, but not even comet shoemaker-levy 9 impact could do the trick, despite applying far more energy and force to Jupiter. There's nothing magical about Pu-238 that will ignite Jupiter now or 50 years from now, but I bet anything that 50 years from now people will still be claiming this will happen "any day now."
edit on 2-2-2011 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 03:45 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


You didn't read my post carefully enough. 15 capsules surely survived because they went in with the PROBE, not the CRAFT. The PROBE insertion of 1995 is what I am referring to. The probe survived to take readings inside Jupiter, that's what it was supposed to do. With the probe came 15 LWRHU's of Pu-238/239. These indeed survived and did not melt because they are made of pyrolitic graphite on the outside for protection. Look at an equation of state graph for carbon and you will see that these pellets were made to increase their melting point while still falling further into Jupiter.

Jupiter indeed DOES have the proper PRESSURE and MATERIAL for fusion deep inside, what it lacks is starting fusion temperature, that normally comes with MASSIVE pressure, but for Jupiter it can be supplied by a FISSION SPARK.

It took about 15 years for the capsules to fall far enough to reach a density that supercritical was reached. Supercriticality CHANGES with density, in this case it's easier to reach supercriticality the farther one goes deep into Jupiter. This is why 2.7 grams eventually reach this point, once fission is initiated you have a SUPER HOT situation because of extra containment. FUSION is assured then and CAN BE HELD once started. It only takes about 2 million bars to HOLD fusion once its started. At the point we are talking, Jupiter has 30 million bars.

Ask yourself why they say the center of Jupiter is diamond. That's because the carbon equation of state says so. A solid carbon object can survive a fall deep into Jupiter all of the way to the center, if it survives entry. It turns to DIAMOND at some point and continues to fall.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by Goliathan
You didn't read my post carefully enough. 15 capsules surely survived because they went in with the PROBE, not the CRAFT. The PROBE insertion of 1995 is what I am referring to.

The probe didn't survive, it over-heated and was eventually crushed by atmospheric forces shortly after it entered the atmosphere, as it slowly drifted down under parachute. It was not designed to survive, it was only designed to transmit data on the upper layers of the atmosphere before reaching a depth and pressure that no human built machine could survive.


The probe survived to take readings inside Jupiter, that's what it was supposed to do. With the probe came 15 LWRHU's of Pu-238/239.

Wrong.
ieeexplore.ieee.org...
en.wikipedia.org...(spacecraft)


The Galileo Probe Descent Module
Operator NASA
Mission type Atmospheric probe
Launch date July 13, 1995
Launch vehicle Space Shuttle Atlantis
Inertial Upper Stage
Galileo Orbiter
Launch site KSC Launch Complex 39B
Kennedy Space Center
Mission duration December 7, 1995
(57.6 minutes)
COSPAR ID 1989-084E
Homepage Galileo Project Home Page
Mass 339 kg (750 lb)
Power 580 W (LiSO2 battery)

The probe was battery powered, it did not use Pu-238. It was not even designed to survive indefinitely, it was only designed to return about an hour's worth of data before dying, which it eventually did due to over-heating.

Jupiter indeed DOES have the proper PRESSURE and MATERIAL for fusion deep inside,

Completely and totally wrong. If Jupiter had the pressure necessary it would not need a "fission spark." The pressure would create the temperature necessary. Sorry, there's nothing that a magical "fission spark" could provide that natural forces far more powerful such as shoemaker-levy 9 could not.
edit on 2-2-2011 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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en.wikipedia.org...:Galileo_Probe_diagram.jpeg

You are wrong. Look at the diagram above. Note the Radioisotopic heaters. There's your evidence.

You are getting pressure for fusion temperature initiation confused with pressure to hold fusion. The threshold to initiate is HIGHER than to hold because to initiate depends on a hot enough temp. caused by pressure.

SL-9 heat produced was several magnitudes LESS than the temps we are talking about. There is no comparison.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by Goliathan
en.wikipedia.org...:Galileo_Probe_diagram.jpeg

You are wrong. Look at the diagram above. Note the Radioisotopic heaters. There's your evidence.

Those are for thermal control, not electrical power generation. You couldn't even engineer those to trigger a hydrogen bomb in a lab, let alone ignite a whole planet.

SL-9 heat produced was several magnitudes LESS than the temps we are talking about. There is no comparison.

Wrong. SL-9 produced MAGNITUDES more heat than thermal control radioisotopes could produce. If you can't even understand that, then you'll never understand why your whole theory is wrong.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


It doesn't matter that they were for thermal control. I just showed you that NASA did successfully inserted Plutonium capsules into Jupiter with a HEAT SHIELD so that they indeed survived. Their stated purpose was for thermal control, as ALL of the Pu capsules of this small size are. They produce 1 watt each. That's not the issue. It's the fact that their mix is FISSILE. This is FACT. Now when they drop far enough, the supercriticality potential increases every hour.

SL-9 prouduced temps in the 1000's of K. A fission reaction of this sort reaches in the 100's of millions of K. So, yes there is a big difference.



posted on Feb, 2 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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I'll check in later if people have more questions...got to go for now.



posted on Feb, 3 2011 @ 02:53 PM
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Originally posted by Goliathan
reply to post by ngchunter
 


It doesn't matter that they were for thermal control. I just showed you that NASA did successfully inserted Plutonium capsules into Jupiter with a HEAT SHIELD so that they indeed survived.

No, they would not have survived. Nothing we build can survive that pressure. The heat shield was just to decelerate the probe so that the parachute could take over while it was still high in the atmosphere. I'm sorry you can't understand this.



posted on Feb, 6 2011 @ 10:24 PM
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Um. I'm sorry that you cannot understand that indeed the heat shield survived and therefore all that was attached survived entry. I cannot make it any clearer. Once these capsules survived entry, their carbon make-up allowed them to survive much farther into Jupiter. This is explained thoroughly in the book link here: members.cox.net...

If the shield survived, so did the capsules, BECAUSE THEY WERE ATTACHED TO THE BACK SIDE!



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 12:02 PM
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www.amazon.com...=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&s=books&qid=1304008802&sr=8-3
New Kindle link to this research



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 12:29 PM
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Originally posted by JupiterGuy
www.amazon.com...=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&s=books&qid=1304008802&sr=8-3
New Kindle link to this research


From the Amazon.com Product Description:

Jupiter impacted in 1994, again in 2009, twice more in 2010? In the early '90's we were told significant collisions of this sort were extremely rare, on the order of once in a thousand years; now, four impacts in 17 years seems extraordinary. What is really going on? "The Philosopher's Stone..." takes a close look at all of the evidence and proposes something incredible, yet scientifically plausible, a bold but stealthy solar system experiment that may change everything...

The idea that meteor/comet impacts on Jupiter are "extremely rare" may be inaccurate. We had no way of knowing about impacts on Jupiter until recently, so we have no idea how often, or how rare, those impacts may be.

It has long been believed that Jupiter's gravity well acts like a vacuum cleaner, sucking up some of the material heading toward the inner solar system. Therefore, I have no reason to believe that -- as the author suggests -- "four impacts in 17 years is 'extraordinary'". We have seen four impacts in 17 years -- and that may be completely normal. That same regularity of impacts may have been occurring for the past 100s of millions of years.

I realize the author is basing this idea that collisions are extremely rare on what some researchers believed back when Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 struck Jupiter. I'm just saying I think those people were wrong. More recent studies and data, such as pictures of heavily-cratered moons of Jupiter, suggest that the impact of Shoemaker-Levy 9 was not that rare an event.

edit on 4/28/2011 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 02:50 PM
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Comet strikes have the highest probability of striking Jupiter than any other planet, Jupiter's Roche limit for comets is around 242,000 km. For any given massive object (for example a planet) and satellite (a moon, asteroid, or comet) in orbit around it, we can define a limit, called the Roche limit, inside of which the tidal forces from that object would tear the satellite apart. Jupiter's Roche limit asteroids is 133,000 km.

It doesn't mean that a speeding comet flyby 240,000 km from Jupiter will break apart or collide, its a measuring distance that can be compared to other planets and the sun, obviously Jupiter wins versus the planets.

Galileo's atmospheric entry probe descended through 150 kilometers of the top layers of Jupiter's atmosphere, it collected 58 minutes of data on the local weather. It only stopped transmitting when ambient pressure exceeded 23 atmospheres and temperature reached 153 °C (307 °F).



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 02:51 PM
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LOTS of talk on ATS about a "double sun" and possibly, manually, lighting Jupiter on "fire" to create a 2nd sun...

Scary thoughst!~



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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All the probe's electronics were powered by lithium sulfur dioxide (LiSO2) batteries.

The atmosphere through which the probe descended was somewhat more turbulent and hotter than expected. The probe was eventually completely destroyed as it continued to descend. The parachute would have melted first, roughly 30 minutes later, then the aluminum components after another 40 minutes of free fall. The titanium structure would have lasted 6.5 hours more before disintegrating. Due to the high pressure, the droplets of metals from the probe would finally have vaporised once their critical temperature had been reached, and mixed with Jupiter's liquid metallic hydrogen interior.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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First of all, the Galileo PROBE did contain 15 LWRHU's Pu-laden, this is proven in the book.

Secondly, it is shown how these LWRHU's actually DID NOT MELT but INCREASED their melting temp. to keep falling into Jupiter. Equation of state of CARBON is the key here.

Thirdly, the Jupiter "flashes" did NOT act like impacts and there is MORE EVIDENCE to show they were ELECTRICAL DISCHARGES than IMPACTS.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 07:49 PM
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Jupiter would require 10 times its mass to initiate fusion, thats why it hasn't and never will, its at lest 1/10th the mass required. There is no real evidence of any significant amounts of carbon in Jupiter's core. The diamond core theory was made up by Arthur C. Clarke.





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