Someone Please Explain To Me - The Theory that Jupiter Ignited - while behind the Sun right now

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posted on Mar, 31 2009 @ 01:44 AM
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Does anyone have an older photo of Jupiter for comparison to that latest one? Does this latest one look totaly normal? I thought Jupiter was supposed to be orange. And where are all the spots? Sorry to nit-pick.




posted on Mar, 31 2009 @ 02:56 AM
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reply to post by Sargoth
 

Gosh, you're right. Jupiter is orange.


Jupiter, photographed earlier this year with Europa



Ladies and gentlemen, I think it is time we acknowledged the seriousness of Prof. Sargoth's challenge to mainstream astronomy.



posted on Mar, 31 2009 @ 08:41 AM
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reply to post by Sargoth
 


My best jupiter image before that was from earlier. Same color. Same general appearance of storms. Here's one from 2008 by someone else with a superior setup though:
paulhaese.net...
Some spots are visible in this recent image:
www.mikesalway.com.au...



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 05:19 PM
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Here's Nidle's latest update. It gives you an idea what his info. is like.


www.paoweb.com...



posted on Apr, 2 2009 @ 05:23 PM
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[edit on 2-4-2009 by Sargoth]



posted on Apr, 3 2009 @ 11:12 PM
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Just found some interesting info. that might shed some light on the subject. Love to hear any thoughts on this.


www.thesurfaceofthesun.com...



posted on Apr, 5 2009 @ 06:27 AM
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reply to post by Sargoth
 

Intiguing, to say the least.

From Sargoth's source.


The surface crust of the sun is mostly made of iron. It is likely however that the surface varies in iron content from one part of the crust to another. Parts of the surface may look much like the fragment above, while other regions along the surface may contain more iron and look like the fragments below.

All rubbish, of course. Scientists have slong since established that the sun is made of burning candyfloss.

[edit on 5/4/09 by Astyanax]



posted on Oct, 30 2009 @ 06:41 PM
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I dont know if anyone has mentioned this yet but in 2010 space odyssey
a black spot apears on jupiter remarkably similar to the one that is there now. The statistics for this to be a coincidence are not very likely. Considering the other secrets Mr Clarke has reveiled in his movie. The fact that he has jupiter igniting in 2010 is very freaky. And remember all
u know it alls if the human mind can think about something it is possible.
The only things that are not possible are those beyond are comprehension. I guess that is the play ground of the God's.



posted on May, 29 2010 @ 05:50 AM
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he he i just been reading this thread and boy have you guys made me giggle, i just want to ask a couple of things and let you all know a couple of facts about this issue...

so questions first... do any of know anything about fusion, plasma and pressure levels?

does anybody know anything about the core of jupiter, cus none of the space agencies do.

why are all of you saying we would be toast if it did light, thats one of stupidest things i have every hurd, its not a giant nuclear war head you know?? what protects the earth from the sun? and arn't we actually closer to the sun than we are to jupiter? also isn't the sun a lot bigger than jupiter?? some of you people seriously make me laugh

ok now to some facts... all the information about jupiter is speculation, we have no solid evidence of pressure levels of whats happening bellow the the surface of jupiter, we don't even know what is at the core of jupiter

the temperature under the gas layer is said to be about 7000 kelvin composing of mainly liquid helium and hydrogen, and they ESTIMATE the core to be at a temperature of about 20,000 kelvin now this don't sound too bad until you notice that these scientist in there great wisdom have stated there is frozen layer between the core and the metalic helium,,, i mean ello there is something quite wrong with your instruments or this theory to think you can get frozen ice between 7000 kelvin in temp and 20,000 kelvin in temp i would go as far as saying that is just stupidity to state.

ok still on the core i guess they don't know whats there cus they can't image it and that explains this ice theory they got, "oh it must be ice"
let me put this into prospective for you...the core is 10 times the size of earth roughly and its under about 80,000 bar pressure even if the core is not in a plasma-tic state its going to be seriously hot and ice just is not an option for a planet omitting serious amounts of heat let alone a magnet field ass huge as jupiters

jupiter is still contracting witch means the pressure levels are still rising, as it contracts it will continue to exert more force on the molecule's inside its core making it hotter.

i will be quite frank with you now based on estimates jupiter is no where close to igniting but as it contracts there is a strong possibility it will reach the pressure and temperature for a small burn cycle, i think at the core there is a very unstable ball of iron and rock and this is fluidic and still heating up explaining the magnetic field being the size it is, and its frequent irregularities that where measured by casini and the other probe i can't remember its name now.

it won't explode its simply spinning too fast and when it does ignite long into the future witch i think it will, it will be a slow steady thing, its not a star or even a red dwarf, one thing you guys did get right, it wouldn't burn for long in the respect of a star or even a red dwarf, a blink of an eye is probably the best way to think of it as quick as it lit it would die out again, its not big enough to sustain long term fusion.

thats my 5c on this subject anyway



posted on May, 29 2010 @ 11:21 AM
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Originally posted by sema sema
he he i just been reading this thread and boy have you guys made me giggle, i just want to ask a couple of things and let you all know a couple of facts about this issue...

so questions first... do any of know anything about fusion, plasma and pressure levels?

does anybody know anything about the core of jupiter, cus none of the space agencies do.

why are all of you saying we would be toast if it did light, thats one of stupidest things i have every hurd, its not a giant nuclear war head you know?? what protects the earth from the sun? and arn't we actually closer to the sun than we are to jupiter? also isn't the sun a lot bigger than jupiter?? some of you people seriously make me laugh

ok now to some facts... all the information about jupiter is speculation, we have no solid evidence of pressure levels of whats happening bellow the the surface of jupiter, we don't even know what is at the core of jupiter

the temperature under the gas layer is said to be about 7000 kelvin composing of mainly liquid helium and hydrogen, and they ESTIMATE the core to be at a temperature of about 20,000 kelvin now this don't sound too bad until you notice that these scientist in there great wisdom have stated there is frozen layer between the core and the metalic helium,,, i mean ello there is something quite wrong with your instruments or this theory to think you can get frozen ice between 7000 kelvin in temp and 20,000 kelvin in temp i would go as far as saying that is just stupidity to state.

ok still on the core i guess they don't know whats there cus they can't image it and that explains this ice theory they got, "oh it must be ice"
let me put this into prospective for you...the core is 10 times the size of earth roughly and its under about 80,000 bar pressure even if the core is not in a plasma-tic state its going to be seriously hot and ice just is not an option for a planet omitting serious amounts of heat let alone a magnet field ass huge as jupiters

jupiter is still contracting witch means the pressure levels are still rising, as it contracts it will continue to exert more force on the molecule's inside its core making it hotter.

i will be quite frank with you now based on estimates jupiter is no where close to igniting but as it contracts there is a strong possibility it will reach the pressure and temperature for a small burn cycle, i think at the core there is a very unstable ball of iron and rock and this is fluidic and still heating up explaining the magnetic field being the size it is, and its frequent irregularities that where measured by casini and the other probe i can't remember its name now.

it won't explode its simply spinning too fast and when it does ignite long into the future witch i think it will, it will be a slow steady thing, its not a star or even a red dwarf, one thing you guys did get right, it wouldn't burn for long in the respect of a star or even a red dwarf, a blink of an eye is probably the best way to think of it as quick as it lit it would die out again, its not big enough to sustain long term fusion.

thats my 5c on this subject anyway






really??? u had to dig this thread from the grave? lol



posted on Jul, 22 2010 @ 08:15 PM
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Originally posted by theresult
reply to post by daz__
 


I mean what do you have to say of the proven scientific fact that jupiter is a dwarf star.. A star that failed to ignite

there you have it FAILED you dittohead...

ITS NOT GOING TO BE A STAR BECOUSE IT CANT BE ONE..

do you even read what infact you type?? and NO i dont mean that in a bad way im just pointing out WHAT YOU SAID..

it failed FOR A REASON

have you ever dont astrophysics befor? or even understand WHY its not a sun nor shall it ever be one..?

BECOUSE IF IT WAS OR HAD THE SAME PROPERTIES OF THE SUN THEN IT WOULD BE ONE..

the mind does boggle............................... IRM help me out here buddie



Sorry first of all you should use a spell checker luckily I can understand what your saying.

Now on to the main piece, just because someone has asked where the theory came from doesn't mean it is not a realistic one, there is no real evidence that Jupiter can or cannot support being a sun.

Maybe in the next 10 billion years we may never truly know that Jupiter had turned in to a sun and not destroyed Earth (even though the human race is on the brig to destroy Earth anyway) or other Planets. Also in many years to come Jupiter may be able to support it.

But at the present time, Jupiter is very unstable with the amount of gas it has inside.



posted on Jul, 22 2010 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by Thill
Well March is in 2 weeks so I guess we wont have to wait long to see if the theory was right or not ;]
MARCH IN 2 WEEKS, WHAT? IT'S JULY 22ND 2010. How old is this?



posted on Jul, 24 2010 @ 11:54 AM
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Originally posted by xxstarlightxxthere is no real evidence that Jupiter can or cannot support being a sun.


There most certainly is evidence that it cannot. We know very well what pressures & temperatures are needed to produce fusion reactions with different materials. We have measured the mass of Jupiter with exquisite accuracy, and we know that it is nowhere near enough for its gravity to produce the pressures & temperatures required for fusion.

The data is incontrovertable: Jupiter cannot become a star.



posted on Jul, 24 2010 @ 12:14 PM
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reply to post by questioningall
 


This isn't an attack, it's just a scientific fact. Jupiter cannot ignite, and if it did, it wouldn't burn long. You are seeing these kinds of sites pop up because humans are -- for the most part -- incredibly dumb animals. We love a good roller coaster ride, and have been sharing stories like this since we first climbed down from the trees. It's pure millennial wish fulfillment, and it will get worse as the economy gets worse, because people who have nothing want everyone else to have nothing too.

That's it.

The fact that "people on the internet" talk about it doesn't mean anything one way or another. People in football stadiums say stupid stuff too. Saying stupid stuff is part of what we do.



posted on Jul, 24 2010 @ 12:27 PM
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reply to post by theresult
 


I've not heard of this at all...well, not unless you count the ending to the film 2010: The year we make contact.

I'm not so sure that we would be toast if it did ignite though...it may be a lot larger than the Earth, but is very small compared to the sun.

Earth would NOT fit into the great red spot on Jupiter 'many' times over either, possibly only 1.5 times, 2 times at a push.

It would fit into Jupiter itself many times though, something on the order of well over 1000 times.

Coincidentally (or not), Jupiter could fit into Sol, our sun roughly the same amount of times, as the Earth would into Jupiter, well over 1000 times.

What would an ignited Jupiter mean?

Well, for a start it would mean that there would be many more worlds that could potentially be habitable for humanity..eventually.

The new 'sun' would warm the 60 odd moons of Jupiter, and there would be several promising candidates among them for human colonization further down the road.



posted on Jul, 24 2010 @ 12:33 PM
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Originally posted by nite owl

Originally posted by Thill
Well March is in 2 weeks so I guess we wont have to wait long to see if the theory was right or not ;]
MARCH IN 2 WEEKS, WHAT? IT'S JULY 22ND 2010. How old is this?

The original date of posting is Feb 2009.
So the theory that "Jupiter has already exploded behind the sun" was proved false in March 2009.



posted on Jul, 24 2010 @ 12:33 PM
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reply to post by fooks
 


No, movies are made to be pleasing and entertaining.

Following the rationale that A.C. Clarck wrote that some decades ago, where are all the monoliths?

People have to stop living in reality constructed by Hollywood, approved by the pentagon. In real world war is ugly and nothing heroic comes out of it, bullets does more than superficial wounds, and Jack Bauer would be dead many times.

Reality sucks, but escaping it through entertainment will not make it better to generations to come. The only purpose it serves, is to divert attention from real problems and let TPTB profit from it.



posted on Jul, 24 2010 @ 12:50 PM
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reply to post by Saint Exupery
 





The data is incontrovertable: Jupiter cannot become a star.


Not naturally anyway...as far as we know.

Not that that statement mean a lot...we know comparatively bugger all about physics and the Universe (multiverse) we inhabit.

Compare what we know, or think we know today to what we thought we knew a mere 2 or 3 thousand years ago. Now consider what we may know in a mere 2 or 3 thousand years time from now...assuming we survive in spite of ourselves of course.

Never say never.



posted on Jul, 24 2010 @ 04:39 PM
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Originally posted by spikey
reply to post by theresult
 


The new 'sun' would warm the 60 odd moons of Jupiter, and there would be several promising candidates among them for human colonization further down the road.


Yeah and half of those so called moons could actually be Planets like Europa for example. Just because Scientists say this that and the next thing doesn't always mean it is true.

Like in 2012 apparently the world will come to an end I don't think so somehow.

Anyhow just because Jupiter cannot ignite right now, just this minute does not mean it cannot in the future and I don't wanna hear Jupiter can't because of so in so, non of us of todays age will be around in the next few 100's, 1000's of years to see it happen.

Just out of interest and Jupiter DID turn in to a sun in the next few hundred years or so and most of you guys on here were wrong, what would that say? Your thoughts



posted on Jul, 24 2010 @ 07:42 PM
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Not to confuse the issue any more...but some people seem to throw around the word "ignite" or "burn" when they talk about Jupiter becoming a star.

It's true that Jupiter and the sun are mostly hydrogen, and it's true that hydrogen can burn given enough oxygen. However -- and this may seem like a picky bit of semantics, but I think it's important -- stars like the sun are not "burning" in the traditional sense of the word, i.e. the Sun's hydrogen is not "catching on fire", but rather the hydrogen is fusing together to make helium. The by-product of this fusion process is heat energy.

I once read somewhere that if all of the hydrogen in the Sun actually "burned/ignited" in the traditional sense of the word, that hydrogen would totally burn up in only 15,000 years. However, obviously the Sun has been shining for billions of years, and will do so for billions more years. So the hydrogen gas in the Sun has not what we would normally say as "caught on fire".

So it seems some people talk about the hydrogen in Jupiter igniting/burning in an explosion and ball of flames. But Saying that the hydrogen in Jupiter can "ignite" and saying that Jupiter can become a star is two totally different concepts. It is pretty well understood that Jupiter does not have enough mass for the pressures to be great enough for stellar fusion (i.e., for it to become a star), and it seems there isn't enough oxygen mixed with the hydrogen for it to traditionally "burn" (i.e., catch on fire) or I would think it would have caught on fire by now.



[edit on 7/24/2010 by Soylent Green Is People]





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