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How heavy is your BoB?

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posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 08:17 PM
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I have a two man tent, axe, knife, and other assorted items in my backpack. I put all this on and wore it and after an hour or so this stuff got heavy and I had to put it down. Might seem like a strange exercise, but I think if you wore what you planned on taking with you around the house for an hour each day you would be more physically able to pick it up and go when the time comes. You don't want to be huffing and puffing through the snow trying to keep up with the team when you have to move on foot.




posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 09:49 PM
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what does BOB stand for? I have seen it mentioned in several threads. I figured its your survival kit but just dont know what the acronym means



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 09:54 PM
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reply to post by Ziltoid_the_Omniscient
 


BoB refers to a "bug out bag".

Just in case.. you know.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 10:01 PM
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reply to post by Ziltoid_the_Omniscient
 


Bug out Bag. BOB. It's the bag you put together for when the SHTF.

Mine is very light now. I found this out a few weeks ago when we had an ungodly ice storm. I had no electricity or the modern comforts so I grabbed my emergency supplies.

They were gone.

My kid had done a lot of camping the summer before and had been relieving me of all kinds of things that I had put back. My BOB consisted of an empty back pack.

You need to prepare for your children most of all when planning for the future.

And keep tabs on whats actually in your BOB.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 10:08 PM
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My wife says her Bob weighs 180 pounds. More than she can carry.

2nd line.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 10:10 PM
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Where I come from, BOB stands for Battery Operated Boyfriend.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 10:20 PM
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Mine is fairly light now, but I'm working on it every week. I still need a mess kit of some sort, folding shovel, food, knife, mosquito spray, wire, hammock..... Oh my! Maybe my dogs could be rigged to carry some stuff.



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 02:58 AM
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No clue as to the weight of mine, but it isn't something I've ever worried much about. I have a workout I do with a pack loaded with 200 lbs of weights to prepare me every year for elk season. I have a pack (the name of which escapes me at the moment) which is basically just a high capcity fiberglass frame with heavy duty canvas stretched over it and some heavy duty cord laced through eyelets in both the canvas and the frame designed to allow a hunter to attach a field quartered elk to pack out of the field. I figure if I can scramble around the Cascades with that on my back, my BOB should be a pretty easy carry.

My only actual concern is with water. To logistically carry as much water as one person would need to not just survive, but thrive for a week in the wild, you'd be adding a minimum of 40-50 lbs to your pack (one gallon a day weighing roughly 6 pounds multiplied by 7 days). This is why I have literally 4 different water purification methods at my immediate disposal (tablets, filtration straws, canister filter, and a small bottle of bleach which has enough in it to clean a couple hundred gallons) plus the equipment to make a solar water still if I find myself in an area with no surface water (8' square sheet of high quality clear plastic, trench shovel, wide mouthed container to capture the drips) and the gear to boil water (camp cooking pan, a half dozen different ways to start a fire as well as a half dozen different types of tinder to catch the flame I generate, regardless the condition).

It might be a good idea for you, if you find your current BOB to be too heavy, to have 2 BOBS... one which only has the bare essentials to survive and another which has more comforts in it if you find yourself in a situation where you can probably hole up in a single place for awhile rather than constantly be moving. In all honesty, if you're in a situation where you have to worry about constantly being on the move, or at least fully mobile on very short notice in the field, the tent should probably go because there's no way you'll be able to set it up and tear it down quickly enough to make it efficient for your needs.

You might also want to learn how to build shelters in the field out of materials available in the field. Rather than carrying 30 lbs of tent, poles, and spikes, pick up 50-100' of nylon cord (maybe a half a lb), a book on building shelters (maybe a lb), and then weigh the benfits of various tarp/blanket/plastic materials you can buy for your pack to fully waterproof any shelter you build. A half dozen space blanket weigh next to nothing for your pack, but can be used to line a quick frame made out of branches and then covered with pine boughs or bark and will be every bit as waterproof as any tent.

I'd definitely not suggest removing items like your hatchet, knives, or even your sleeping bag from your BOB, however. These are all life savers and time savers.



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 04:09 AM
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mine weighs 35 kg and includes 65w 12v solar panel ( flexibel ) ,a CB-scanner(those walky-talkies the gov use in EU) a portabel motorised worktool where u can put various other heads on to saw,grind anything u really wanna do with it (to echance and eventually have better tools available to me in Sitx), a cell-phone who works on tri-band (all freqs commercially used), a flashlight with led's on the side u can easily use to light a room with from 40 to 60m² for 8hours without a recharge, my old mp3 (hey, why no music in SitX )


Then there is the non electrical stuff : a 1 man tent, medical supplies( things like antibiotics,those water cleaning pills and anti-rad pills) 5 days worth of dryfood, raingear , shaving equipment :-) , a card-game, 2 signaling flare's and sewing tools some wonderglue. i have 5 pacs of sigarettes stored in there to cause it seems one they they could make a nice bargain chip for food .....

There must be some other stuff i there i cant remember right now. But i can tell u that the whole thing works and has been tested before . In 2005 i took a 21 days journey to Marseille from my location. Its something like 1000km and i've done more then 80% of it on foot while going tru the beatiful places France holds for the world to admire. Most of the time i slept "off the grid". If u find a good location no1 will even notice you are camping out wild ,it saved u tons of money and i rather like the "sneaky" part..... I did not hunt not do i intend to hunt. Here in belgium i hold a Valid Fishing permit but i aint allowed to fish in france so most of the food was bought our "scavenged". some days i went to farms and asked if they could use a hand in exchange for a campingspot and most of the time it even got me food and some new friends.

Point i want to make is : guys dont look at the weight of ur BOB as a factor. Take ur BOB a do something like 40 km a day with it tru various terrains. Thats the only way u gonna "feel" how good ur BOB really is



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 04:27 AM
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i think your aim should be to not have to carry anything but a knife and a flint... well that would be my aim anyway.. better to live off the land than out of a back pack.

[edit on 15-2-2009 by purplemonkey]



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 05:50 AM
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Originally posted by korath
I have a two man tent, axe, knife, and other assorted items in my backpack. I put all this on and wore it and after an hour or so this stuff got heavy and I had to put it down. Might seem like a strange exercise, but I think if you wore what you planned on taking with you around the house for an hour each day you would be more physically able to pick it up and go when the time comes. You don't want to be huffing and puffing through the snow trying to keep up with the team when you have to move on foot.


Good call, it's always wise, even if you're proficient in carrying bergens and Bail-out-bags to keep your 'muscle memory' and fitness sharp.

Mine (minus the boots from it that I'll be wearing) is about eleven kilos plus a crossbow (slung) and ammo (carried externally).

Spartanic! 35 Kilos is groovin'! But that's too much weight for me. I like to know at least that I'll be able to run about with my BOB


I like how you worked your way around on the farms and so on. That's among one of the best ways for keeping the cash out-flow to a minimum.

[edit on 15-2-2009 by WatchRider]



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 08:50 AM
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Originally posted by Ziltoid_the_Omniscient
what does BOB stand for? I have seen it mentioned in several threads. I figured its your survival kit but just dont know what the acronym means


This may help.
Survivalist Acronyms
ABC = Atomic, Bacteriological, Chemical (USA)

Bug Out = Basically it means if you as a person or family have to flee your home, town or place of work because the place has become to dangerous to stay in.

BOB = Bug Out Bag. A Rucksack, travel bag or container containing survival tools, clothing, food and kit

BOV (1) = Bug Out Vest. A travel vest fitted out like a BOB

BOV (2) = Bug Out Vehicle. A vehicle modified to help you bug out and sustain you during your journey, In the US its often a 4x4 like a Jeep, and in Europe its often a camper van. BOVs really should be capable of being lived in for at least a week, so they should have sleeping space, cookers, water, toilet, storage etc. But in the US the trend is for big powerful go anywhere 4x4s. Single folks tend towards the 4x4s, family guys the campers. Some folks have B O Boats, other cycles, other horses and a few light aircraft / microlights.

Cache = A remotely located store of food, fuel, and extra kit for survivalists to draw on, usually sited somewhere along the chosen Bug Out Route

EDC = Every Day Carry. Its a list of items that the seriously prepared will never venture out of the house without. Knife, Flashlight, Compass, Cell Phone, Wallet, Mulitool etc

FAK = First Aid Kit

FYI = For Your Information

GHB = Get Home Bag, same as BOB

GOOD = Get Out Of Dodge bag (another name for a BOB

INCH Bag = I’m Not Coming Home Bag (another name for a BOB)

IMHO = In My Honest Opinion

KFS = Knife, Fork, Spoon

MRE = Meals Ready to Eat

NBC = Nuclear, Bacteriological & Chemical (UK)

NESW = Never Eat Shredded Wheat (method of remembering points of compass in clockwise motion)

No Duff = This is the real thing, not a practise

PSK = Personal Survival Kit = normally a small tin or pouch containing a mini survival kit, popular with soldiers venture explorers etc

PAW = Post Apocalyptic World

PDW = Personal defence Weapon

POCKSIE = Planning, ordering, controlling, supporting, informing, evaluating ( stages in planning a bug out event)

RETREAT = Place of safety to live in during disaster, can be your home if modified or a camper van/ mobile home or purpose built facility.

SAK = Swiss Army Knife

SERE = Survival, Escape, Resistance, Evasion

SITX = Situation X (Unknown future catastrophe)

SITREP = Situation Report (Feedback from someone involved in an event)

TEOTWAWKI = Common acronym used by survivalists to describe a complete social collapse IE The End Of The World As WE Know It.

WTSHTF = When The # Hits The Fan



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by Lookingup
Mine is fairly light now, but I'm working on it every week. I still need a mess kit of some sort, folding shovel, food, knife, mosquito spray, wire, hammock..... Oh my! Maybe my dogs could be rigged to carry some stuff.
Actually they have saddle bags for your canine friend, but you'd probably want to let him carry his own food in them.


Saddle Bag



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by korath
I have a two man tent, axe, knife, and other assorted items in my backpack. I put all this on and wore it and after an hour or so this stuff got heavy and I had to put it down. Might seem like a strange exercise, but I think if you wore what you planned on taking with you around the house for an hour each day you would be more physically able to pick it up and go when the time comes. You don't want to be huffing and puffing through the snow trying to keep up with the team when you have to move on foot.
My bag weighs close to 35lbs fully loaded. I wear it while walking on my treadmill. LOL I kill two birds with one stone that weigh.

Ideally though, I think the consensus is your bag should weigh no more than 25% of your total bodyweight. i.e.. If you weigh 200lbs, your bag should be 50lbs or less. A lot of it has to do with your fitness level as well. Someone that doesn't smoke, and is in good cardiovascular shape, could probably carry a lot more weight with minimal effort.



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 01:05 PM
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I don't know exactly how heavy mine is though I know its pretty light. Instead of a two man tent why not look into a bivy tent or just learn to fasten a tarp into a shelter.



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 12:22 AM
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There are no hard and fast rules. Your BOB should contain the minimum to get you home or to your retreat (depending upon the various scenarios you have thought about and rehearsed). There is no X lbds or X % of body weight involved at all. It is whatever you need to get you from Point A to Point B, and should be a weight you can carry without exhausting yourself.

It's that simple.



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 01:22 AM
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Mine weighs 42lbs. I consider it light. Its mainly just the tools i need for long term survival. No food or water just tools. Food and water can be found. But i do keep a pouch full of garden seeds that gets replaced every year.

[edit on 19-2-2009 by Darkice19]



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:13 AM
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reply to post by korath
 

01) pocket signalling mirrors *** can acquire mirrors from dead cars ***

02) multi-tool pocket knife , stainless steel so it wont rust *** done ***

03) camo mosquito/ insect netting suit *** done *** - bugs will carry disease from the dead

04) complete protein seeds like amaranth *** done ***
en.wikipedia.org...

05) sleeping bag *** done ***

06) most weapons are at bug out location.

07) hand crank radio and flashlight *** done ***

08) lensatic compass & directions *** done ***

09) fishing line, hooks, and bobbers *** done ***

10) backpack *** done ***

11) shake LED flashlight *** done ***

12) water proof insulated boots *** done ***

13) gerber folding hand saw *** done ***

14) 12volt dc power inverter - 400 watt - *** done ***
may upgrade this to higher wattage

15) waterproof container - full of matches & fire steel striker rod *** done ***
indian wood bow method works well too ...

16) bushnell binoculars 16x or better *** done ***

17) food - cheap , long shelf life - generic granola bars *** done ***
some stored long term shelflife rice or other cached near rally point, multiple locations.

18) dessicant for ammo cans - *** done ***

19) pocket microscope - *** done ***

20) 28 ga. galv. steel snare wire - *** done ***

21) Texsport® Folding Pick/Shovel/saw - bass pro *** done ***

22) snake/poison kit - bass pro *** done ***

23) knife sharpener *** done ***

24) gas mask with airtight drinking ability *** done ***


25) swiss stainless steel bayonet(no rust) *** done ***

26) US army M7 bayonet (ferrous can use as striker) *** done ***

27) CDV -777 geiger counter set *** done *** ( near bugout in cache )

28) 20 big ziplock bags - *** done ***

29) wiki books, survival info, wikipedia backup on DVD-r - read via PC near bug out locale *** done *** - stored at multiple cache locations,
wiki taxi to read wikis offline.

30) aluminum foil for: - solar oven - solatubes - weak EMP shielding if done right *** done ***

31) non Genetic modified seed packs, 8,000 carrot seeds & amaranth *** done *** ( small seeds almost no weight or size )

32) battery hydrometer - for 12 volt systems we plan to setup *** done ***

33) Combined Hybrid Custom Survival Guide - printed - dbl ziplock bagged
stored at multiple cache locations *** done ***

34) speedy all, easy all - sewing tools for leather *** done ***

35) wind belt - 12 vdc and volt regulator *** done ***

36) 2 pint water bottles, 1 full of bleach, and marked *** done ***

37) p-38/p-51 or real can opener *** done ***

38) battery recharger - triple a's for pocket microscope - D's for geiger and ionization meter *** done ***

39) 8' x 12' tarp with brass ringlets *** done ***

40) 100' of nylon rope *** done ***

41) plans for a Astrolabe and instructions *** done***

42) left blank

43) left blank

44) Several Trash bags, heavy duty thick mil, work as water proofing or poncho, seal in heat *** done ***

45) water purification USP sublimated iodine 1 oz bottles (2) *** done ***
also for ppl allergic to shellfish 4 oz of bleach in small carry tube, and eyedropper *** done***
10 drops of bleach per gallon per online site for water purification.
SODIS water purification

46) edible plants list for US *** done ***

47) hand auger and forestner bit set *** done *** ( at bugout locale )

48) Chisel *** done *** ( at bugout locale )


Total weight is around 45 lbs. or 20 Kg.

Good Luck to you all !

The blanks are items I dropped from my list, just have not cleaned it up.




[edit on 19-2-2009 by Ex_MislTech]



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:34 AM
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Originally posted by Northern Raider
WTSHTF = When The Sheet Hits The Fan


Here in the USA this also means When the "Schumer" Hits the Fan.

In reference to Chuck Schumer, although ppl have told me its
the same thing and I can see why they might think that.



posted on Feb, 19 2009 @ 02:37 AM
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Originally posted by 2Resistance
I don't know exactly how heavy mine is though I know its pretty light. Instead of a two man tent why not look into a bivy tent or just learn to fasten a tarp into a shelter.

I agree with this for stealth reasons, a full leafed double or triple
lean-to will basically make you invisible from the air and 270 degrees.

Use some thick mil trash bags for your bedding with lots of dry leaves,
and I swear its more comfortable than my cheap mattress, lol.



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