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Prominent Orchard Park man charged with beheading his wife

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posted on Feb, 13 2009 @ 09:55 PM
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Prominent Orchard Park man charged with beheading his wife


www.buffalonews.com

By Gene Warner
News Staff Reporter

Orchard Park police are investigating a particularly gruesome killing, the beheading of a woman, after her husband — an influential member of the local Muslim community — reported her death to police Thursday.

Police identified the victim as Aasiya Z. Hassan, 37. Detectives have charged her husband, Muzzammil Hassan, 44, with second-degree murder.

(visit the link for the full news article)


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posted on Feb, 13 2009 @ 09:55 PM
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I imagine this isn't exactly what moderate muslims wanted to see happen for this News Station. Main stream media has ignored honor killings even though it seems to happen here in the US. I'm not sure how to react here! On one hand I'm outraged that the police didn't protect her even though there was a restraining order against this man. Or that this man is being charged with '2nd degree murder" when, if I read the facts correctly, this was premeditated which should be first degree. This whole situation is quite confusing!
Zindo

www.buffalonews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Feb, 13 2009 @ 10:52 PM
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I don’t see how its an honor killing. Sounds like domestic violence. I am sure there are more facts to the incident that aren’t in the article, but I don’t see clear premeditation. Its also tougher to prove so its routinely knocked down to assure a conviction. Restraining orders have no teeth to protect a woman in this situation. They can work for harassment or sometimes prevent assault. Some deranged guy bent on murder is not going to say to him self, I may get life for murder but I don’t want to do a year for violating a restraining order. I wonder why she was at the business? I am guessing they warned her to stay away if he was there.



posted on Feb, 13 2009 @ 11:15 PM
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not an honor killing. honor killings are pure moments of passionate rage. Seriously. i've seen some close ones in yemen. noone in my family, but i wouldn't put it past them. its not a muslim thing btw, its a more of a tribal thing, though alot of muslims do commit them. but sikhs and hindus do to. it comes from being tribal over there, somewhere in the roots. after one generation in a western culture, this kind of thinking gets abandoned



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 09:23 AM
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Unless you carrying a sword or large knife around as a usual thing you must have had to think about cutting your spouses head off and then brought the weapon with you. Thats premeditated and that's first degree.
As far a honor killing goes, The article does not call it an honor killling, But if this wasn't done in the US and done in his native country, it would be called as such because the wife would be considered to have disgraced the man!
Zindo



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 09:37 AM
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I don't really any relevance to religion here.
Good ol' White guys also kill their spouses and girlfriends too, sometimes in rather grissly ways. Is blowing someones head apart with a handgun or shotgun any less gruesome than cutting off her head?
Something that the media usually ignore is the violence committed against women in the western world too. All the rapes, murders and yes, in some cases what could be deemed "honour" killings. I wonder what the rape and murder statistics are for the US alone for any given year.

Yes, it happens in the Muslim world, and it's wrong, but the western cultures are hardly without sin when it comes to our record on these crimes against women.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 09:47 AM
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I'm sure MSM will use this to further villify the Muslim religion and forget to draw a parallel between how many Christian or Atheiest/Agnostic domsetic violence murders there have been--as someoen poited out, they hav ebeen just as gruesome.


Authorities say Aasiya Hassan recently had filed for divorce from her husband.

"She had an order of protection that had him out of the home as of Friday the 6th [of February]," Benz said.


Quite sad; she was trying to get away from him and for good reason it seems. There is a growing trend to assume that any woman who files a restraining order against her husband/boyfriend is only being vindictive, which will only lead to more needless deaths like this.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 10:12 AM
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I know that killing is killing, but shooting someone, stabbing hem, or beating there head with a sledgehammer is one thing. it takes a bit of work to cut someone's head off. You gtta be pretty mad to do that.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by Britguy
All the rapes, murders and yes, in some cases what could be deemed "honour" killings.



Good point. Many men and sometime females everywhere you go kill for the same reason this guy probably did.

So is this 2nd degree thing some sort of PC pass? Or cultural consideration?


Anyway its called murder where ever its done and this guy should be looking at 1st degree.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 02:53 PM
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Originally posted by Britguy
I don't really any relevance to religion here.


Well, then you must have forgotten all the news articles showing that radical muslims (not all) seem to be particularly fond of beheading as a tool of torture and death.

By any chance do you recall Daniel Pearl. for example? Seems likes there's a pattern to all this to me.

Appeasers and apologists ...

[edit on 2/14/2009 by centurion1211]



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 12:43 AM
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Aweful crime, shame that women like this sometimes don't see how their
action of getting a restraining order could 'upset' their man. I just don't understand how a woman can file one, and then go about her normal routine, thinking the problem has been solved?!?! Very naive, in my op.

Before filing in court, maybe a prudent step for a woman to take would be to have a safe place, secret from her spouse, all pre-set-up to move to, FIRST; then file the restraining order. And stay out of his normal places that he frequents, to provide an additional amount of safety for herself.

And I agree with Finn- beheading seems like some type of extra-rageful method of death...I only shudder at the thought, wondering if the poor woman was alive & conscious; or knocked-out first. I have no idea what weapon was used, but a knife or machete would take several moments, I think.
A gas chainsaw, with a new chain, would be so extremely quick, that the look of terror would still remain in the eyeballs of the head probably!



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 09:26 AM
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Originally posted by FRIGHTENER
Aweful crime, shame that women like this sometimes don't see how their
action of getting a restraining order could 'upset' their man. I just don't understand how a woman can file one, and then go about her normal routine, thinking the problem has been solved?!?! Very naive, in my op.

Before filing in court, maybe a prudent step for a woman to take would be to have a safe place, secret from her spouse, all pre-set-up to move to, FIRST; then file the restraining order. And stay out of his normal places that he frequents, to provide an additional amount of safety for herself.


That's only half the problem--the person filing for the order can only do so much after they get it. If the attacker is realy determined he'll hunt them down--and besides, the vast majority of "Escaping" spouses don't have the money to go incognito--they're bound by job/chid's school/whatever to stay in their area. If they cannot go to a woman's shelter (it may be full. some will expell residents if the X so much as callsl and asks if they are there) a restraining order is all they can do.

Add on to that, consider how many of these people filing may have had so me version of "I'll kill you if you leave me." If their spouse is that paranoid to begin with do you think they are going to be able to sit down and plan their escape without incurring more physical/emotional harm? No.

It's as much a problem with law enforcement dropping the ball IMO. If a restraining order is issued they need to take that seriously, and the one holding the order also needs to be consistant in reporting violations.



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 11:01 AM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 


And acording to the USSC, policeare not required to enforce restraining orders;

articles.latimes.com...

Excerp from the article:

July 04, 2005 in print edition B-13 L.A. Times

Last week, the Supreme Court ruled that police are not required to enforce restraining orders, even if state law mandates that they do so.

It was a bizarre decision, and a terribly misguided one. Having spent the last 28 years as an advocate and prosecutor in the courts of six states – and having spent three years before that as a battered wife – I was particularly disappointed.

For one thing, the ruling threatens to sabotage many hard-won gains. Principal among these was the advent, in the late 1970s, of civil restraining orders, warning batterers to cease their abuse and triggering police investigation and arrest for violations. In response to widespread police under-enforcement of these orders in the early days, 19 states – including Colorado, where this case originated – passed laws in the 1980s and 1990s mandating that police arrest batterers if restraining orders were violated.

The high court’s decision also sends mixed messages to abuse victims, who have often been chastised for not seeking the help of the state when they feel threatened.



Zindo



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 01:59 PM
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That is crazy Zindo.


A ruling like that is going to directly cause many more women and men and children to be murdered.

I know there are a lot of people who think that the courts routinely screw over men and cater to the woman but rulings like this make me wonder.

If that is an attempt to cater to the men inthe divorce system this is the absolute wrong way to go about it.

In my experience it was actually reletively difficult to get even a temporary restraining order, which lasted a couple of days, and then to get a permanent one took almost as much evidence as a trial.

I would be pissed to go through that only to find that the police didn't find it convenient to enforce.

Yes there are some people who use the courts to screw over their partner --but of course in a divorce someone always feels screwed over.

What offends me is this growing idea that the victims of true domestic violence, even attempted or actual murder, just have to suck it up because the police can't be bothered to deal with the offender or the courts are too PC and weak to take a stand against him/her because they're afraid he or she might cry "court bias!"



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 


What that realy is for is so cities and counties have an out against law suits of women who are left out in the cold with no protection. CYA against citizens is the comming thing for municipalities. They just want your tax money, not the responsibility to keep you safe and alive!

Zindo



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 01:10 AM
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Thanks for reply & quote, asmeone2.

the vast majority of "Escaping" spouses don't have the money to go incognito--they're bound by job/child's school/whatever to stay in their area. A restraining order is all they can do.

I hear what you're saying, I just think a woman choosing this path needs to do a whole lot more, in conjunction with the order of protection.

Add on to that, consider how many of these people filing may have had some version of "I'll kill you if you leave me." If their spouse is that paranoid to begin with do you think they are going to be able to sit down and plan their escape without incurring more physical/emotional harm? No.

Graphic! That kind of "emotional harm" leads all too often to the actual act. If someone has uttered such horrible & terrifying words, then the spouse would be obligated to vacate her location & proximity to that type of criminal terrorist at all costs, IMMEDIATELY! Regardless of job, school, or "whatever"... Nothing is more important, how could your priorities reflect otherwise?


It's as much a problem with law enforcement dropping the ball IMO.

Agreed. STAR for that! As a surviving family member of abduction/murder/suicide of my cousin, and the cops KNEW of her persuer, shame on the law!

If a restraining order is issued they need to take that seriously, and the one holding the order also needs to be consistant in reporting violations.

"Reporting" becomes a moot point, when the aggressor is at the door...



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 11:29 AM
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Originally posted by FRIGHTENER
I hear what you're saying, I just think a woman choosing this path needs to do a whole lot more, in conjunction with the order of protection.

Add on to that, consider how many of these people filing may have had some version of "I'll kill you if you leave me." If their spouse is that paranoid to begin with do you think they are going to be able to sit down and plan their escape without incurring more physical/emotional harm? No.

Graphic! That kind of "emotional harm" leads all too often to the actual act. If someone has uttered such horrible & terrifying words, then the spouse would be obligated to vacate her location & proximity to that type of criminal terrorist at all costs, IMMEDIATELY! Regardless of job, school, or "whatever"... Nothing is more important, how could your priorities reflect otherwise?

I used to think like that until I actually found myself in such a situation. I will just say, it is more complicated than it appears at the surface.

Law enforcement is very reticient to act on threats of violence alone, especially if the peson making them has no prior record. Thier attitude is often "If you aren't bruised, then you haven't been abused." So many woman find themselvs in a situation where they are in danger from their spouse but do not have the evidence to prove that the threat happened or that their partner might actually do it.

I would wager that by and large these men that go as far as to murder their spouses are the ones that are rediculously paranoid about their spouse cheating on or leaving them... the kind that thinks she is having an affair with the cashier at the grocery store if she is 5 minutes late from buying food.

People like this are paranoid micromanagers, I will tell you from expereince, it is very difficult to sit down and plan a safe escape without doing something that will alert the partner. If he find out, you can bet that situation just became a lot m ore unsafe, even deadly.



If a restraining order is issued they need to take that seriously, and the one holding the order also needs to be consistant in reporting violations.

"Reporting" becomes a moot point, when the aggressor is at the door...

Too many woman don't take it seriously enough, IMO. They let the guy around for little things at their convenience but then expect him to abide b it if he's making trouble even when she has sent him a message that it does not matter.


[edit on 16-2-2009 by asmeone2]



posted on Feb, 16 2009 @ 06:24 PM
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Originally posted by ZindoDoone
Unless you carrying a sword or large knife around as a usual thing you must have had to think about cutting your spouses head off and then brought the weapon with you. Thats premeditated and that's first degree.

Logically I would agree premeditated. The same logic would apply to most murders. Sadly that alone does not reach the criteria for a first deg conviction. If the district attorney over plays his/her hand they could put the case in jeopardy. If the DA office thinks they have enough evidence to secure a first they will go for it. I am not making predictions but again sadly more often than not its lowered further in a plea agreement.



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 01:46 AM
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I used to think like that until I actually found myself in such a situation. I will just say, it is more complicated than it appears at the surface.

Very sorry. Hope all is well for you now. Star for genuine reply!

I am familiar with domestic violence, seen it from a bunch of different sides and situations, and endured it as a youngster, myself... so I know exactly what you're saying. When the controlling, abusing male is in full rage, with no qualified challengers, everyone present is helpless, and hopeless...

You're right again, there are no "Behind Closed Doors Cops", they only go by what can be proven. However, as witnessed recently, this trend is changing for the better. Many calls result in a forced seperation, or an arrest, bruises or not.

P.S. Where's my star?
What am I, chopped liver? just kiddin






[edit on 2/17/2009 by FRIGHTENER]



posted on Feb, 17 2009 @ 10:26 AM
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reply to post by Plasma applicator
 


I would agree that it would end up being second degree after the basic negotiation but, he should have been charged with first then plea bargain to second. Nowif they find that they had a slam dunk first degree after some good investigation, they are stuck with the lesser charge!

Zindo



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