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Teenage rebellion stems from the point when our child selves realize that what is going on is WRONG

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posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 10:28 PM
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My theory is that the phenomenon of teenage rebellion is sparked by the fact that part of our inner child knows what is going in the world is wrong. For you see, you, me, all adults have been indoctrinated into the system without realizing it.

Children sense this and become angrier and angrier, culminating in their teenage years, and then, into and through their twenties, they slowly become indoctrinated into the system themselves. This all happens on a subconscious level.

Marketing fuels this further. Parents are uncool, because they are no longer the demographic that is marketed to, for they're not in that coveted 13-24 range with loads of disposable income. This creates a generation gap. All new toys and products that only the kids really know about and must have, complete with their own associated lingos, all thought up in conference rooms and board meetings.

Yet, I believe that our souls all have the understanding that this is wrong. We take this out on our parents. How often do you remember, as a child, thinking you were smarter than your parent? That's because you WERE! The system dumbs us down as we get older, indoctrinates and bascially turns us against the very laws of life in order to ensure that the few have power at the expense of the many.

The problem is, towards the end of the teenage years and into the 20s, most people turn to avoidance, and then become part of the system themselves.

[edit on 12-2-2009 by wolf367]




posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 10:30 PM
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reply to post by wolf367
 


Are you a parent yourself?

I just wonder, if you have brought 1 or more children through their teenage years, or have younger children that you are preparing to do this with.



posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 10:32 PM
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I tend to think it starts with alcohol and drug use.



posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 10:32 PM
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Originally posted by asmeone2
reply to post by wolf367
 


Are you a parent yourself?

I just wonder, if you have brought 1 or more children through their teenage years, or have younger children that you are preparing to do this with.



I'm not a parent. But I really remember the thoughts I had as a child and as a teenager and I've analyzed them throughout my 20s and this is the conclusion I've come to. Perhaps this is only my experience, but I don't believe so.



posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 10:33 PM
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Ah yes-
Margaret Mead "storm and stress"

www.loc.gov...


Based on her study of 68 girls in three villages in the western part of Ta'u island, Mead reported that adolescence was not a stressful time, compared with the expectation of adolescent "storm and stress" in Western societies. She attributed this difference to cultural factors. She argued that, living in a homogenous culture, Samoan adolescent girls did not face numerous conflicting personal choices and demands.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 10:33 PM
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Interesting topic. Like most things in life, its probably a combination of factors. Some part of you is working on seperating from your parents and establishing a sense of yourself as what will (hopefully) be a self-supporting adult someday soon, so I guess its natural to be pulling away from the parents and family during those years.

Another point...I read once that the brain doesn't finish fully developing (neurologically speaking) until sometime in the early 20s. That means a teenager's brain is, on a neurological level, fundamentally different from an adult brain. Specifically, the areas of impulse control and judging how your actions impact others' emotions are among the last brain functions to develop. So you can see teens are thinking with "almost adult" brains except they don't have as much control over their impulses and reactions, and they aren't able to take other people's feelings into account when making deceisions to the same extent that an adult can. There may be other differences as well but those are the two I specifcally remember being mentioned (sorry, no link for you, this was something I read a year or two ago).



posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 10:34 PM
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Originally posted by stevegmu
I tend to think it starts with alcohol and drug use.


I'd argue that alcohol and drug use is the beginning of the "avoidance" phase. The teenager has gotten angry, he's rebelling, nothing is changing. He turns to drugs and alcohol. The system and society promote alcohol in order to start dumbing us down. This is the gateway into adulthood in today's America.

[edit on 12-2-2009 by wolf367]



posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 10:41 PM
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I think its more likely to be when a child realises life isnt fair and they try to change that, i dont think outside influences make a child rebel though at least not the way the OP says. I dont know really i will become a father later in the year and i know i have much to learn and look forward to it, i feel if i can do my best for my child i can give it the best start possible, how im not sure but i wont be blaming society or the media if i screw up.
And i dont believe i was ever smarter than my parents, at the time yes but now i know different.

Also drugs and alcahol, please steve that is a very naive comment.



posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 10:41 PM
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Originally posted by wolf367

Originally posted by asmeone2
reply to post by wolf367
 


Are you a parent yourself?

I just wonder, if you have brought 1 or more children through their teenage years, or have younger children that you are preparing to do this with.



I'm not a parent. But I really remember the thoughts I had as a child and as a teenager and I've analyzed them throughout my 20s and this is the conclusion I've come to. Perhaps this is only my experience, but I don't believe so.


I think a lot of it is that the teenage years are over-hyped to be stressful. Parents tiptoe around their teens and become afraid to find the balance between letting them learn and properly disciplining, wheras some of the kids themselves think they have a liscense to be dramatic and narcisistic.

However--a lot of the parent's reaction to the rebellion *is* jusfitied if the kid is doing illegal/dangerous things. If he is drinking/doing drugs/having irresponsible sex, as many teens do, it is that parent's responsibility to react.

Most of the "anger" I had during my teenage years came from stupid stuff that I did, not my parents being heavy-handed. I think you underestimate the value of learning that in life you sometimes do get angry because of circumstances beyond your control, but it is better to learn to deal with the anger in a productive way.



posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 10:44 PM
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reply to post by wolf367
 


This was exactly what I believe I experienced as a child-teen. I am a father now and had never gotten into drugs when I was in school 15 years ago. I saw the problem. I have always seen the world as being full of imaginary rules and solid BS. The only downside to being awake to this is that you become an outcast to many people...some of which you love. I will teach my son the same values(if the economy doesn't first). It sucks, but you must live with open eyes.



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