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The ancient cults: Stellar, Solar, Saturnian, Lunar?

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posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 07:26 PM
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Does anyone know about the theories connected with the idea that there were 4 main ancient cults that later combined to some degree? The idea is that following a catastrophe of some sort (like an asteroid collision or major oceanic shift that may be the basis for the "great flood" story in the old testament), there was chaos on the earth. The leadership of the sun, moon, and Saturnian cults joined to create the modern judeo-Christian-Zoroastrian-Islamic system. For example (says the theory), the word "ISRAEL" comes from a combinanation of the gods ISIS ("is": moon goddess of Egypt) RA (sun god) and EL (saturnian god).

There seem to be various versions of this theory floating around...some people who call themselves "astro-theologists" have various web pages about this. Its also alluded to briefly in Ben Stewart's popular net films "Esoteric Agenda" and "Kymatica."

Does anyone know more about this theory, or could point me to an authoritative source discussing it? It seems interesting but the information in this area is...patchy, to say the least.




posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 09:41 PM
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"Patchy" is a kind way of putting it.


Originally posted by silent thunder
Does anyone know about the theories connected with the idea that there were 4 main ancient cults that later combined to some degree? The idea is that following a catastrophe of some sort (like an asteroid collision or major oceanic shift that may be the basis for the "great flood" story in the old testament), there was chaos on the earth.


There's no geological or archaeological evidence of a "great flood" or global catastrophe. Humans have been literate and writing things down for well over 5500 years -- although local disasters have been recorded, there are no global disasters (and there's no global devastation of species/villages/etc in the fossil record or archaeological record. Even the last extinction wasn't a sudden event.)


The leadership of the sun, moon, and Saturnian cults joined to create the modern judeo-Christian-Zoroastrian-Islamic system.

Oy.

There were thousands of deities worshipped and they included abstracts like "Harmony-Truth (Ma'at)", "the Nile Inundation", the bride of Yahweh (yes, really), dozens and dozens of Egyptian gods, the whole Greek pantheon, Chinese pantheon, shamanistic deities, animistic deities, and almost nobody worshipped Saturn. There was also the deification of rulers (Pharaohs and the Eastern kings, including Chinese kings.)


For example (says the theory), the word "ISRAEL" comes from a combinanation of the gods ISIS ("is": moon goddess of Egypt) RA (sun god) and EL (saturnian god).

It doesn't. It's a perfectly good Hebrew word/name meaning "God contended"... and in fact, it says so in the Bible/Old Testament/Torah.


There seem to be various versions of this theory floating around...some people who call themselves "astro-theologists" have various web pages about this. Its also alluded to briefly in Ben Stewart's popular net films "Esoteric Agenda" and "Kymatica."


It's generally people who bought into this idea, which is of fairly recent (last 150 years) manufacture.



posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 09:51 PM
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Well, thanks for the succinct and helpful answer. Looks like another interesting yet inaccurate theory, in that case.

Or does anyone else have an opinion to the contrary?



posted on Feb, 13 2009 @ 08:02 AM
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All religions evolve from a former one, usually inbetween ages and a much needed time of change.

I cant believe that so many shrug at the word Israel.

There is so much more to it then just a Hebrew meaning.


If the Hebrew root word 'ra' means evil....why would God use this root word of evil in a Holy name. The big red flag here is God needs a special land????? This is not the Most High here....the root words tell a story of a power wanting to claim godship over a people....bringing them out of Egypt where 'Ra' was the true light, true god....then the Hebrew language just ironically ends up with its root word for evil being 'ra'.

People need to stop shrugging and stop saying, because the bible says so....and start wonder why.

The OT has relations to many other beliefs...you can see the sifting out of other lords and killings to make this happen.

Always, only thoughts
LV



posted on Aug, 3 2012 @ 11:33 PM
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pretty old post, hope you found some answers. if not i would suggest looking into michael tsarion. i don`t remember which one of his works explained about the cults but "origins & oracles" explains a lot.

www.youtube.com...
www.youtube.com...
www.youtube.com...

its long but very interesting stuff weather you believe it or not.



posted on Aug, 5 2012 @ 01:07 AM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


The problem with theories like this, is that ancient cultic belief focused on far more than sun, moon, saturnian, and star worship. In fact, Saturnian worship does not come about for a very, very long time. Ancient culture cultic belief is, most often, centered around a local, tutelary, patron deity of a specific city.

For example, the ancient Sumerian town of Erech (Uruk) was the home of the goddess Inanna, variously called Ishtar, Astarte, Asherat, Shaushka, Qedesh, and Ashtoreth in a host of other cultures. Now, Inanna is the goddess of love, war, fertility, queenship, and the planet Venus. She is not solar, lunar, saturnian, or stellar. What Ishtar is, though, is a goddess of such wide resounding fame that her worship exists across the entire Near East, finds it's way into the Bible, and has been re-imagined (incorrectly) for modern feminist movements. Inanna is THE surpremely worshiped feminine principle of the Near East, more popular than Isis even.

Generally speaking, ancient cultures' worship breaks down like this:

Sumer (6000-2000 BC): agricultural worship, with the chief god (Enlil) representing rain and the air. Secondary worship (via Enki, Inanna, and Ninhursag) was on plant and human fertility, and animal husbandry and fertility. The sun and moon (Utu and Nanna) were actually considered secondary deities of worship, although still a part of the Seven Who Decree. There is no true Saturnian god in Sumer. Enki receives Saturnian associations in much later times. He was not brought into the noosphere with them. The closest Sumer comes to a star-cult is Inanna (see above), but Venus is not a star.

Egypt (4000-700 BC): the commoners religion, the state religion, the priestly religion. The commoners believed in the death-cult, centered around the hieros-gamos of Isis and Osiris, which itself was borrowed from Sumer (Inanna and Dumuzi). The commoners also prescribed to workmans' gods (like Ptah, Bast, Bes, Nephtys, etc). They were concerned with ephemeral, day-to-day living, work, and health. The state religion was entirely solar, based, originally, upon the worship of Horus, and then Khepera-Re-Atem, and finally on Amun-Re. The state religion was concerned with properly governing the spiritual edicts throughout the land; fulfilling divine laws, keeping borders safe, sanctifying the gods and the like. Finally, the priest-craft religion was mystical, based on the metaphysical mechanisms behind the universal order. Deities like Thoth (lunar god of wisdom), Amun (the omnipresent one), Khonsu (the Sacred Son, and moon-child to Horus' solar birth). The priest-cult was concerned with exorcism, healing, electing leaders, and keeping Egypt pure. Eventually, through Tutankhamun's use of Amun-Re, the priest and Pharaonic cults were linked.

Babylonia and Mesopotamia (3000 - 700 BC): Babylonian worship, through the advent of the state-god Marduk, introduced, and expanded on, the idea of the Storm-King. Where Enlil was primarily a god of airy nature, and a minor weather god in Sumer, Marduk was a fully-fledged storm lord, who brought rains, floods, and all the fury of nature's various storms. This element would soon go on, spreading to Canaanite, Phoenician, Hittite, Hurrian, and even Phrygian and Greek belief structures. It even doubled back into Egypt in the form of the god Set, a storm-lord from the southern desert. The dominant god across the board was most commonly the storm-god. In Babylon he was Marduk, and to a lesser extent Adad. In Canaan and the Levant it was Baal, Sutekh, and Hadad. In the Hittite and Hurrian pantheons it was Kumarbi, Teshub, Taru, and Tarhunt. Even in Greece, Zeus is a thunder-and-lightning storm god. The only other prominent deity in some, but not all of the cultures, is the sun-goddess/god (variously called Shamash, Arinna, Hebat, Hannahannas), and the goddess of the twin duties: love and war (Anat, and Astarte, Shaushka, and Qedesh - all of whom are Inanna from Sumer).

Zoroastrian belief structure is formulated around the life-long conflict between the Beneficent and Malevolent spirit-gods Ahura Mazda and Ahriman. Through the intercession of Mithra, human beings may purify themselves, become right by the laws of the spirit, and ascend to a new, better life. There are a lot of solar and lunar elements to the religion, but it is not entirely.

So, solar, lunar, and stellar beliefs sometimes permeated, but were in no way the only, or even the chief, elements of ancient cultic belief. Israel, which means "triumphant with God," was not a combination of Isis, Re, and El at all. For one, Isis and Ra are Greek interpretations of Aset and R[e], their true Egyptian names. Finally, El, or Il, is Yahweh, so, that one I have no problem believing. But no, Aset, R[e], El did not become Israel.

~ Wandering Scribe



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