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Strange star in the sky

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posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 02:54 AM
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I've seen it too, but I've been seeing it for months, and it's not Venus. It is interesting that many people have seen it. The light in the sky twinkles a bit, which Venus doesn't do.




posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 03:20 AM
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reply to post by yellowcard
 


its venus
line 2
line 3
its venus
i asked an astronomy teacher which i already knew the answer and she said yes its venus



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 04:16 AM
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I've read almost all the posts here, and I think people are talking about two different objects. Some of you are talking about Venus, which currently is quite high in the west when the sun sets, and Sirius. As soon as the first person mentioned the changing colors--blue, red, green--I knew what it was. Sirius is the only star that I know of that shows those beautiful alternating colors. When Venus sets (around 9:00 p.m. as of 2/15), Sirius is directly south.

A handy tool to have is an inexpensive, hand-held planisphere, which is a star chart with a wheel that rotates to adjust for the time and time of year. A planisphere won't help identify planets, but with it you'll be able to identify all the stars and constellations.



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 04:20 AM
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It might be Comet Lulin.

If you look at a sky chart, that tells you how to spot a 'fixed star' called Spica, it's nearby.

Apparently, it's rare, weird, green, glorious. Double-tailed and highly mysterious.

Experts are calling Comet Lulin, the Comet of Co-operation. Like every comet, Lulin signifies the demise of an old regime. In this case, it's the end of the line for the fools and fat cats who created the credit crunch. No brave new world can be born while the same old bumblers sit in the same old offices, trousering the same old bonuses while acting like sheep and talking bull. Lulin will see them all off. Then slowly we'll get a rebirth of prosperity. Around the world, across the internet, a new movement of wealth creation is about to be born.


www.Cainer.com - it's on the home page as of Sunday 15th February but the page is updated daily.



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 05:02 AM
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Originally posted by JustInCase101
reply to post by yellowcard
 


its venus
line 2
line 3
its venus
i asked an astronomy teacher which i already knew the answer and she said yes its venus


It's not Venus, I know what Venus looks like, I'm not retarded. It's probably some other planet but it's not Venus.



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 05:08 AM
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reply to post by Merkabah
 


It May be Nibura Plaet x, www.youtube.com... some say it will look like a second sun by the year 2010



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 05:32 AM
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reply to post by whatsyourname
 


Yes im very well aware of planet-x... although i dont believe this particular object to be that at this time.
Although i have other thoughts...


[edit on 15-2-2009 by Merkabah]



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 06:30 AM
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First time reply'er
This star or comet, i saw it last night around 8 and 9
i live in denmark and i never saw anything like it, It flickers or changes colors. But i'm sure as hell know that light wasn't an airplane



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 06:40 AM
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Uh yeah, that would be Venus. It’s even brighter than usual right now because it’s really close.

You don’t have to search very far before you find that this really super bizarre light in the sky is exactly where Venus is supposed to be and always is this time of year. It’s Venus people, sheesh!

I’m just amazed and somewhat dismayed that so many cant recognize the most brilliant object in the sky (outside of the sun and moon) when they see it, or tell the difference between it and other planets or objects. I know that we don’t need to know these things for survival or navigation at the moment, but whatever happened to curiosity?

I mean, someone seriously suggested that it might be the north star! On the western horizon!



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 07:41 AM
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OK Everyone. To put this matter to bed the next clear night I get here (UK) I will do a panoramic of the sky from South - North through the Western sky. I have posted this pic before but no-one seems convinced it's Venus.




Here are the settings if you have a manual camera.:-

Canon 20D
ISO 800
f/5.6
Was using Canon 75-300mm IS (image shot @ 75mm)
4 second exposure

Mounted on tripod using remote switch.

It's been cloudy/snowing the last few days so not had the opportunity so far. If there are any other unusual lights, let me kmow where in the sky and I'll capture those too (Northern hemisphere only).



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 07:55 AM
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reply to post by Hellish-D
 


I was gonna say something but I don't quite know enough to say anythin about astronomy.

I have learned to look for Polaris and it is actually quite tricky to find. It is not easy to find. I use a little trick to learn where it is but if you didn't know, you would never find it.



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 07:56 AM
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OH how these threads make me wish I had a telescope.


I got one in a garage sale but it doesn't have a tripod.



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 09:00 AM
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Yes, this is Venus.



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 09:20 AM
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I would say that at this point we have explored and exhausted the subject.

VENUS! SATURN! Comet LULIN! North Star!

Whatever…

Maybe now we should ask WHY it is so bright, like never before?
What have changed and what does it proof?
What is the trend? How will it look in a month? A year? Four years…?



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 09:32 AM
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Its on a collision course with earth!!!!! OMG



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 11:05 AM
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Originally posted by twilightzone
Maybe now we should ask WHY it is so bright, like never before?
What have changed and what does it proof?
What is the trend? How will it look in a month? A year? Four years…?


The planet Venus, which is also called our "sister planet" because it is just slightly smaller than Earth, goes through predictable sycluses which makes it appear brighter and bigger at certain times. This winter Venus, as an evening object, will actually look brightest February 19, so I hope for a clear sky that night!

This article in SPACE.dom was written in August last year:

Viewed in the western twilight, this planet always appears dazzlingly bright to the unaided eye, and more so in binoculars. Venus reaches its greatest elongation — its greatest angular distance — 47 degrees to the east of the sun on January 14. It will appear at its brightest in midwinter as it heads back down toward the sun, reaching its greatest brilliancy for this apparition on February 19 at magnitude –4.6. The planet will be most striking then, shining nearly twice as bright as it does now.
Venus will then slide back toward the glare of the sun, but because it will appear to pass more than eight degrees north of it when it passes inferior conjunction on March 27, a most unusual circumstance will take place for a few days around that time: Venus will be visible as both an evening and morning object, glowing low in the west right after sunset and also low in the east just before sunrise. It finally (almost reluctantly) will vanish for evening viewers view by the end of March.


Venus will then become a beautiful, bright morning star in the beginning of April:



In mid January 2009, Venus reaches dichotomy (displaying a "half moon" shape). Then, during February, it shows us an increasingly large crescent phase as it swings toward Earth. Indeed, those using telescopes will note that while the Earth-Venus distance is lessening, the apparent size of Venus' disk will grow, doubling from its present size by January 3. When it has doubled again in size on February 26, its large crescent shape should be easily discernable even in steadily held 7-power binoculars.

But even after it passes inferior conjunction on March 27, our Venus show will not be over, for it dramatically reemerges as a dazzling "morning star" low in the eastern sky by the beginning of April. Then, a repeat performance will begin, with the above sequence of events reversed. And that will continue right through to the end of 2009.

www.space.com...




Venus has been known since prehistoric times. It is the brightest object in the sky except for the Sun and the Moon. Like Mercury, it was popularly thought to be two separate bodies: Eosphorus as the morning star and Hesperus as the evening star, but the Greek astronomers knew better. (Venus's apparition as the morning star is also sometimes called Lucifer.)

www.nineplanets.org...



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 11:10 AM
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Originally posted by Sergeant Stiletto
Well...I'm in the U.S. and my house faces due west and right now I can look out of my front door and see a very big - something - that does not twinkle. I mean it's big.

I'm under the impression that Venus is an early evening star, so I don't think that's it.

Does anyone else see what I'm talking about? I never noticed this until about four or five months ago.


I have noticed the same exact star you are talking about.....

I haven't seen anything so bright before - star.

I am in East Tenn. and it is North West of me about the 10 hour (if due N is considered 12 hour).



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 12:02 PM
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Has anybody seen this object and Vensu at the same time?? Since if they see both, it obviously can't be venus. Though, as a amateur astronomer, IMO its probably Venus. Wish I still had my Vixen R200SS Astrophotography telescope, as I"d get some great pictures then.



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 01:08 PM
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Check out the Jupiter Ignited thread, mabe could give some answeres...
YouTube Jupiter clip



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 03:02 PM
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reply to post by yuefo
 





A handy tool to have is an inexpensive, hand-held planisphere, which is a star chart with a wheel that rotates to adjust for the time and time of year. A planisphere won't help identify planets, but with it you'll be able to identify all the stars and constellations.


It appears that it won't help to identify this object that people jsut can't seem to identify with even Stellarium and other programs. this thing doesn't seem to match where it should be in the sky for all viewers. One viewer may say its venus because its in the right spot but then someone else says that it's not venus because it's in another spot.

It's a sign like it's stated in my signature block. The new messiah is taking credit for it as did the last one. The "three wise men" traveled and followed the star and were led to the coming of the new christ.

I know, its quite the joke..

Rgds



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