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Strange star in the sky

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posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:18 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by fleabit
 


Scintillation (twinkling) has nothing to do with the distance of the light source or whether the light is reflected or not. It has to do with the relative size of the light source.

[edit on 2/14/2009 by Phage]


I'm sorry, you are mistaken.

The distance absolutely has something to do with why stars appear to 'twinkle.' Planets also can appear to twinkle somewhat, but because of their relative distance to our planet, and the fact that they are discs instead of points of light has everything to do with it.

There are endless resources out there to read up why stars have the scintillation effect, versus planets, which do no (or have a much lessened effect).




posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:18 PM
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reply to post by foremanator
 


I think it is YourAnus (uranus) .
At first it was Jupiter shining this bright,I saw it in my scope.
I am sure it was jupiter coz I saw the four moons..
Funny thing is that I still thought it was jupiter until mid january when I looked at it again and there was no moons.
I count tell the color either cos it looked like an photon flare from the star trek movies.. Hehe, sounds stupid but it is true.

Just an energy ball if you will, but I am sure it is just the atmosphere playing triX on me ! I hope atleast !!



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:22 PM
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Originally posted by TheRealDonPedros


Hey interestedalways... I've got a joke for you. (since you find the truth so funny)

Whats super bright, in the west and interests (always) you so much you wont even fire up Stellarium or head over to wikipedia to research on your own???????


You have a joke for me???

Maybe the joke is on you.

Living in a locked box!

So those of us on here questioning the light we observe............

Why now? What is different?

ATS has been around for years but never has a group of concerned people come forward advancing the idea of something new in the skies.

OH! Silly lemmings..............It is VENUS.

Then tell me kind sire................What and Why has Venus brought us a new form?



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by AllTiedTogether
 


I don't think anyone is saying its Jupiter. Jupiter is behind and to the west of the sun during the day and totally below the horizon at night.

Give it a few months and Jupiter will be back, then you'll have another spaceship/UFO mothership to argue about.

Peace.





I



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:26 PM
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I must seriously consider what I'm doing on this so-called conspiracy board, doesn't make sense.

I thought the level of intelligence was higher on ATS...


Well one thing they do try to have, is courtesy and decorum. You may want want to work on that.


As far as this object goes, it supposedly twinkles many colors. Like I said, unless it's sporting a huge set of Christmas lights, this means the object is very far away indeed. Aka a star. Therefore not in our solar system, and therefor not Nibiru, or any other supposed object in our solar system that is going to plow into us anytime soon.

And while sure, you can conjecture and guess about things we don't know, but lacking facts, we sort of have to go with what we know. You need facts as much as you need research and guesswork, or it means nothing. There is no need to be snide or nasty to folks who want to present known facts.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:26 PM
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its....

V ery
E asy
N ot
U nusual
S orry

Blink Blink !



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:29 PM
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Oh,I must add that it is visible now, at 22:30 W/NW here in Oslo Norway !
Date: February 14th 2009

Thanx !
Peace !
Chillax !



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by PuzzleMaster
reply to post by foremanator
 


I have spoken to many of my close friends on this subject and a few people who I do not consider very close but they are very knowledgeable anyway. What seems to be to most popular answer from both sides is that what we are seeing is the space station. While this seems to be very possible, mostly because the space station is only a couple hundred miles above us, I wouldn't place all my bets on that explanation just yet. And IMO, I really do not think that such an explanation is plausible because of the amount of light that is emitted by this object. Granted, a space station will reflect a fair amount of sunlight back towards us, but as I have observed this object in the sky many times myself I cant really commit to the whole "man made" idea as some others have.


I do not know if you realize it or not, but the ISS (International Space Station) is a constantly moving object, Orbiting at a Speed of roughly 17,000 MPH. In comparison, the Earth generally rotates at a Speed of 1,000 MPH. Thus, you will never witness the ISS acting as a Celestial, or Planetary Body.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by interestedalways
 


I'm not really calling you a lemming, I just find it frustrating that ATS users, people that are supposedly curious about the environment around them wouldnt take the time to do some research. This isn't a controversial topic so the research you find on the internet will not be affected by bias. Wikipedia is a great source of information for non-controversial topics. I totally believe in a transformation occuring and feel something signifigant is going to happen in the next few years but I'm quite sure you're looking at Venus not the "Harbinger of Change"

Really, you would not be the first to mistake Venus for something other than what it really is.

Like I said in a previous post, screw finding out what it is. If it makes you feel good when you look at it, and you've wrapped a story around it that helps you get through the day, then... screw it, believe what you want.. Just don't get angry when that story doesn't jibe with others peoples perspective.

Peace



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:35 PM
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Originally posted by fleabit

I'm sorry, you are mistaken.

The distance absolutely has something to do with why stars appear to 'twinkle.' Planets also can appear to twinkle somewhat, but because of their relative distance to our planet, and the fact that they are discs instead of points of light has everything to do with it.

There are endless resources out there to read up why stars have the scintillation effect, versus planets, which do no (or have a much lessened effect).


Yes, the distance affects the relative size but it is not the distance itself that causes the twinkle. Stars, being very distant appear as points and are affected by very small scale disturbances in the air (as I said). Planets, being closer, appear larger and are thus less affected by smaller atmospheric disturbances. A very small, bright, yet nearby, object can twinkle.

As I said, it is the relative size of the object which determines the amount of scintillation. Any object with a small enough apparent diameter will, according to a given set of atmospheric conditions, twinkle. Stars, planets, even satellites will twinkle if the air is roiled enough. It matters not the distance, it matters not if the light is reflected.

[edit on 2/14/2009 by Phage]



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:42 PM
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Originally posted by TheRealDonPedros
reply to post by interestedalways
 

Like I said in a previous post, screw finding out what it is. If it makes you feel good when you look at it, and you've wrapped a story around it that helps you get through the day, then... screw it, believe what you want.. Just don't get angry when that story doesn't jibe with others peoples perspective.


At the end of the day, I could actually care less about the bright light in the sky, thank you!

I have no dog in this fight. I am merely an instrument. An instrument of observation, sometimes I am right, sometimes I am wrong.

My world and emotional objectivity is neither hampered nor elated by the outcome of either.

Let's just keep exploring brothers and sisters.

And for those of you who exist merely to tell the rest of us we are in a sense uneducated fools, well.................

We all reap what we sow. Divine justice at work.

It is not for me to judge or to assume I am above my fellow man.

Bright star in the sky~!



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:47 PM
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reply to post by ChemBreather
 


i713.photobucket.com...

Thats what Oslo's sky should look like your time (22:30) in the N/NW. The brightest star is Capella and at around 0.0 magnitude its one of the brightest stars in the sky.

Lemme know if that helps.. If you're seeing something that isnt in that picture then "interestedalways" might have something to be actually interested in.

Peace

Give the link a few seconds, the image seems to have shrunk somehow.. Working on it..



[edit on 14-2-2009 by TheRealDonPedros]

[edit on 14-2-2009 by TheRealDonPedros]



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:53 PM
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I hope this post won't bring some divine wrath upon me...
But it seems that Phage is right when he says that the size of the light source matters:



Stars (except for the Sun) appear as tiny dots in the sky; as their light travels through the many layers of the Earth's atmosphere, the light of the star is bent (refracted) many times and in random directions (light is bent when it hits a change in density - like a pocket of cold air or hot air). This random refraction results in the star winking out (it looks as though the star moves a bit, and our eye interprets this as twinkling).

Stars closer to the horizon appear to twinkle more than stars that are overhead - this is because the light of stars near the horizon has to travel through more air than the light of stars overhead and so is subject to more refraction. Also, planets do not usually twinkle, because they are so close to us; they appear big enough that the twinkling is not noticeable (except when the air is extremely turbulent).

Stars would not appear to twinkle if we viewed them from outer space (or from a planet/moon that didn't have an atmosphere).


And this even I can understand.


www.enchantedlearning.com...



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:58 PM
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And while sure, you can conjecture and guess about things we don't know, but lacking facts, we sort of have to go with what we know. You need facts as much as you need research and guesswork, or it means nothing. There is no need to be snide or nasty to folks who want to present known facts.


this is an example of what I mean... This person believes that facts have been brought forward to the ATS threads that can be used to find this out. Facts are not statements like.....




I just checked with Google Earth and Stellarium, and the bright star I'm seeing is Venus.




This thread is kind of pointless without a picture. I would guess satellite or weather balloon, however.




it could be Rigel: As I've said a few times now get Stellarium and you can find out for yourself what it is.

It's quite easy

('
')



Phage explained earlier why it is brighter than normal here.

He also stated that it was venus a number of times.... which is it?


Seems to me like its post after post after post describing Venus or Sirius.

so which is it? You being an astronomy buff and leading people to believe that it's as easy as getting a program and "looking up", should be able to tell.



STAR gazers are mistaking the startlingly bright love planet Venus for a festive return of the Star of Bethlehem.

Proves my point. People are going to see this as a sign of the new messiah... But that's a coincidence too. They are saying that because they are probably ATSrs.




It can be either. Both Venus and Sirius are very bright and are in the sky at the same time. After sunset both are visible. Venus sets about three hours after sunset and Sirius sets about 6 hours after that. If what you are seeing is in the western sky for a few hours after sunset it is Venus. If it is high in the sky toward the east after sunset it is Sirius. If it is in the west late in the evening it is Sirius

A great explanation of how to prove what it is. Ooops! Does it matter where I am on the planet or does your theory work for everyone? How can light now be one of two possible things that are each viewed in different areas.... at the same time??????

I must be lost.... maybe we can get MikeSingh in here to answer this... maybe he's an astronomer that knows how to use a telescope and actually do measurements on celestial bodies...

Rgds



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:59 PM
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So here is a lesson in why stars twinkle! Hallelujah.

You people (god i hate that term) are missing the point.

There has recently been a large bright light in the sky.

And those of you who want to close down the discussion with your contrived explanations just BORE me!

I think I speak for others here on ATS as well.

There is a time and place for everything and you that want to squash discussion of something different just are well..................PREDICTABLE



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by ziggystar60
 


No kidding... Phage is right???

I was under the impression he was always right..Luckily this time I'm on the side that agrees with him. Normally I just look at him as a grumpy old fount of knowledge pissing his healthy dose of reality on my supernatural cornflakes.


Peace.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by fleabit

I must seriously consider what I'm doing on this so-called conspiracy board, doesn't make sense. I thought the level of intelligence was higher on ATS...


Well one thing they do try to have, is courtesy and decorum. You may want want to work on that.


As far as this object goes, it supposedly twinkles many colors. Like I said, unless it's sporting a huge set of Christmas lights, this means the object is very far away indeed. Aka a star. Therefore not in our solar system, and therefor not Nibiru, or any other supposed object in our solar system that is going to plow into us anytime soon.




Although I fully agree with your decorum statement, I must digress with the idea that what you (Or anyone else) are witnessing is not in fact a Planetary Body from within our own Solar System.

Given any number of Upper and Lower Atmospheric Disturbances, a Planet can in fact produce Color Shifts, and if this Object is on the Magnitude Scale of what some describe, it is most definitely not only Closer than a Star (Minus a few Possible Candidates such as Sirius, which is one of the closest), but also of a greater Magnitude than any known Celestial Object.

BUT, I also fully agree with you that we are not witnessing some object which is going to "Plow Into Us Anytime Soon".

BTW, I did see your earlier statement, so I know that you do realize the fact that Planets can "Scintillate" at times.


I want to reiterate my earlier Post (on Page 10), wherein I put forth the distinct possibility of this Object being either Venus, Sirius, or the Comet Lulin. Venus has the Magnitude, Sirius the extreme Amount of Color-Shifting Scintillation, and the Comet Lulin the Factor of Surprise.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by TheRealDonPedros
 


hahaha






posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 04:11 PM
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Originally posted by bignick
You guys have mixed it all up.

There's the biggest luminous star in the sky which is Sirius and there's the big pulsating star/planet/object which pulsates/flickers into different colors non stop and which was spotted by most gazers some 3 months ago.



Here's a zoomed in video of this pulsating object:

www.youtube.com...
[edit on 14-2-2009 by bignick]

[edit on 14-2-2009 by bignick]


Is that a facetious statement? Because that "UFO" appears no different than Sirius.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 04:15 PM
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reply to post by TheAgentNineteen
 


I'm with you on the Venus or Sirius guess, but comet Lulin is too dim to be see with the naked eye (unless you're a complete eagle eye).

This is from "www.UNIVERSETODAY.com", regarding Lulin.

As it moves to its closest approach to Earth on February 24, Lulin is expected to brighten to naked-eye visibility in rural areas, (at best about magnitude 5 or 6) and will be observable low in the sky in an east-southeast direction before dawn.

-----------------

A 5 or 6 magnitude is very dim. There is literally dozens of stars in the sky brighter than that. For example Venus is around a -3.5 and Polaris a 2.0 (The lower the brighter).

Thanks for bringing that to my attention though, I'm going to try and find it with my telescope when the 24th comes around.

Peace




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