Cestius Pyramid

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posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 11:02 PM
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One of most forgotten pyramids is the Cestius, in excellent condition despite its tomb being robbed in antiquity.



It was built 2,021 years ago and in only 330 days. it is 27 meters high and 22 meters on the side. It has the steepest angle of any surviving pyramid. It is of brick-faced concrete covered with slabs of white marble standing on a travertine foundation.




It modern times it was entered in 1660 and restored. The inscription on it stated:


Gaius Cestius Epulo, son of Lucius, praetor, tribune of the plebs, septemvir epulonum

The work was completed, in accordance with the will, in 330 days, by the decision of the heir [Lucius] Pontus Mela, son of Publius of the Claudia, and Pothus, freedman


At the time of its construction, the Pyramid of Cestius would have stood in open countryside (tombs being forbidden within the city walls). Rome grew enormously during the imperial period, and, by the third century AD, the pyramid would have been surrounded by buildings. It originally stood in a low-walled enclosure, flanked by statues, columns and other tombs. Two marble bases were found next to the pyramid during excavations in the 1660s, complete with fragments of the bronze statues that originally had stood on their tops. The bases carried an inscription recorded by Bartoli in an engraving of 1697


This identifies Cestius' heirs as Marcus Valerius Messala Corvinus, a famous general; Publius Rutilius Lupus, an orator whose father of the same name had been consul in 90 BC; and Lucius Junius Silanus, a member of the distinguished gens Junia.




The pyramid was along the Tiber to the SW


The sharply-pointed shape of the pyramid is strongly reminiscent of the pyramids of Nubia, in particular of the kingdom of Meroë, which had been attacked by Rome in 23 BC. The similarity suggests that Cestius had possibly served in that campaign and perhaps intended the pyramid to serve as a commemoration. His pyramid was not the only one in Rome; a larger one of similar form but unknown origins stood between the Vatican and the Mausoleum of Hadrian, but was demolished in the 16th century.[1]


Sources

www.aviewoncities.com...

eng.archinform.net...




posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 






and perhaps intended the pyramid to serve as a commemoration



Kinda like the ones located at 16.6°N 198.4°W..?





posted on Feb, 13 2009 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by chapter29
 


Say where?



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 06:11 AM
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An update to this Roman era concrete built pyramid.

Another pyramid existed in Rome which was called the Meta Romuli.




It is described as larger than the pyramid of Cestius and of great beauty. From its marble slabs were made in the tenth century the pavement of the Paradiso of S. Peter's and the steps of the basilica. It stood at the intersection of the Via Cornelia and the Via Triumphalis, on the east side of the latter, and its southern part was removed when Alexander VI constructed the Borgo Nuovo in 1499. The rest stood until 1518 at least




The location of the Meta Romuli in Rome




A medieval image of the destroyed pyramid

www.mydocsonline.com...

A special thanks to Rich at the Hall of Ma'at for finding the information on this obscure pyramid.







[edit on 11/9/09 by Hanslune]



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 09:14 AM
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Greetings Hans,

Very interesting thread
, but I am surprised not more responses though.

That last one you posted was interesting as well.

S&F



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 




"Forgotten" among pyramid chasers, I assume.
But it's (almost ironically, but not quite) this pyramid and no other which gave rise to modern pyramid-shaped tombs, via Antonio Canova (early 19th century).

I like talking about it (it shows, doesn't it?
), simply because I like it, I like being there.
And since there are historic cemeteries nearby, the place still retains - albeit vicariously - some of its ancient commemorative role.

I know you (the OP) know this page - and everything there is to know about this pyramid - but those who are new to this might like the wonderful Lacus Curtius website.







[edit on 11-9-2009 by Vanitas]



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by Vanitas
 


Thanks for more information. When in Rome I usually try to get by to see the Cestius...helped by the fact that a good Japanese restuarant the Sushisen is near by.

I thought the 19th century fandom of pyramids was driven by the Sudanese/Nubian mini-pyramids?

Alien Carnage: I have found that information on real places and stuff rarely gets more than a few posts. While yet another thread on 'The Egyptians couldn't have built the pyramids' will get hundreds!

Kinda like a novel set in Victorian England usually sells much better than a history book on Victorian England.

習い [ならい]



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 11:19 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
reply to post by Vanitas
 


Alien Carnage: I have found that information on real places and stuff rarely gets more than a few posts. While yet another thread on 'The Egyptians couldn't have built the pyramids' will get hundreds!

Kinda like a novel set in Victorian England usually sells much better than a history book on Victorian England.

習い [ならい]

That's because there is no conspiracy here, and this is largely a conspiracy site. There isn't much to speculate, and not many uncertainties to mull over.

What, in particular, would you like people to discuss about this particular pyramid? Other than to say, "That's really neat" which is a one-liner. The larger one of unknown origins may be of more interest.

Tell me that, and we might spur a discussion.

It's like spurring up a conversation about the statue of liberty. Not really too much to talk about on a board such as this.



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 11:23 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
reply to post by Vanitas
 


Thanks for more information. When in Rome I usually try to get by to see the Cestius...helped by the fact that a good Japanese restuarant the Sushisen is near by.

I thought the 19th century fandom of pyramids was driven by the Sudanese/Nubian mini-pyramids?


Oh, among archaeologists I am sure.
I was referring to a fashion in 19th century tomb sculpture.
(Here's just one example of Canova's art. It's actually a drawing, but I like it even more than photos of the actual monument. BTW, his own heart is buried in a pyramid-like structure. Talk about love...
)


Sushi, eh...?

Why not?
I like visiting the "Protestant" cemetery - but it doesn't sound half as cool. ;-)
Or appetising, for that matter!



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 11:31 AM
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That's because there is no conspiracy here, and this is largely a conspiracy site. There isn't much to speculate, and not many uncertainties to mull over.

What, in particular, would you like people to discuss about this particular pyramid? Tell me that, and we might spur a discussion.


Howdy

Yep but it does have an importance within the fringe world and the discussion of conspiracy. Fringe writer never mention it as it shows that someone in the ancient world, within recorded history, could build a pyramid- and in 330 days, and out of concrete. Without the need for an advanced Civilization, spacemen or vibrations. Of course one could consider the Romans an advanced civilization depending on your point of view.

So the question in regards to the fringe world would be. How did the Roman do what the fringe holds the Egyptians could not do....and they did it twice.



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 11:40 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

That's because there is no conspiracy here, and this is largely a conspiracy site. There isn't much to speculate, and not many uncertainties to mull over.

What, in particular, would you like people to discuss about this particular pyramid? Tell me that, and we might spur a discussion.


Howdy

Yep but it does have an importance within the fringe world and the discussion of conspiracy. Fringe writer never mention it as it shows that someone in the ancient world, within recorded history, could build a pyramid- and in 330 days, and out of concrete. Without the need for an advanced Civilization, spacemen or vibrations. Of course one could consider the Romans an advanced civilization depending on your point of view.

So the question in regards to the fringe world would be. How did the Roman do what the fringe holds the Egyptians could not do....and they did it twice.


Well there are some problems i see in this. One of the main ones being the egyptians built it much larger, and 2,000 years prior, without the use of a cement base such as the romans used to hold theirs together, and without having to quary and drag 60 tonne blocks around.

That's the time difference from then, to now. I consider the Romans to be pretty advanced in comparison to a culture 2,000 years prior to that.

Edit to add a comment about this: "could build a pyramid- and in 330 days, and out of concrete."

I suspect they could create concrete blocks much faster than it took the eqyptians to carve out 2 million blocks out of limestone and quary them to the location.

[edit on 11-9-2009 by Ecidemon]



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 11:54 AM
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What, in particular, would you like people to discuss about this particular pyramid? Other than to say, "That's really neat" which is a one-liner.


Actually, why not?
And not necessarily in one-liners.
As you can see, I for one immediately seized the opportunity to, yes, basically say "that's neat" - because I like talking about it.


And why not?

I see people here talking about all sorts of things (the great majority of which don't even seem to have any wider cultural relevance - OR conspiratorial undertones).

And even though the site does have a "conspiracy" as its main theme, I don't think many people join it to discuss conspiracy theories at all.
I know I didn't.
I, for example, was interested in time/space anomalies, and I don't think there is a conspiracy angle to it.





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