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Rockefeller Laws: An End in Sight

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posted on Feb, 9 2009 @ 08:07 AM
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Rockefeller Laws: An End in Sight


www.nytimes.com

The New York Legislature finally seems poised to overturn the infamous Rockefeller drug laws. The impending change comes too late for the tens of thousands of low-level, nonviolent drug offenders who wasted away in prison because of mandatory sentencing policies when they should have been given treatment and leniency. But after years of building support for reform, legislative leaders now have it within their power to make wholesale changes in this profoundly destructive law.

The Rockefeller laws tied the hands of judges by requiring lengthy prison terms even for first-time offenders. Essentially, the law allowed prosecutors to decide who went to jail and for how long. The system, which has been imitated throughout the country, filled the jails to bursting, while doing nothing to curb the drug trade.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Feb, 9 2009 @ 08:07 AM
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I know that nonviolent passive drug users have been filling jails and prisons since the outlawing of marijuana, opium and alcohol.

Alcohol was legalized once again after the prohibition shambles, and in the wake of a democratic majority in Congress, the Rockerfeller laws of mandatory sentencing for violators may soon change, giving the judical branch the broader authority to determine sentencing as should be. In most cases, some small possession charges seem overplayed in criminality as a repetitious and bad propaganda slogan should be.

At the heart of the matter is the ruined lifes in the aftermath of hard time for offenders who, IMO, should not even be charged with a misdemeaner. It should be legal and at most, an infraction such as a california stop while operating a motor vehicle on public thoroughfares.

It is a shame that the perceptions of a few in viewing the world can in effect, cause such pain in the lifes of large numbers of decent people.

In fact, should their own rules apply to those pushing these laws, I could guess that up to 100% of them would be doing hard time.

This may be a step in the right direction towards abolishing the double standards of our system.

www.nytimes.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 9-2-2009 by imd12c4funn]



posted on Feb, 9 2009 @ 08:49 AM
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I couldn't agree with you more!!!! When we take into consideration the fact, FACT that a prison term irrevocably changes the life of a young man and statistically one prison term leads to another and another. These kids go in with a limited amount of understanding of crime and come out with a PHD.

One other factor to consider is the census. I don't know about other areas but in NY the prisoners are counted as population for the town and county they are incarcerated in. The town of Dannemora in the northern most reaches of the state has a population that is well over 50% African American..............from the prison! With jumps in population of upwards of 2000 people for the larger Maximum security facilities this gives these small rural areas an unfair representation in state and federal programs and voting.

The reason these laws have been allowed to stay on the books is the voting power of these rural areas. The legislators from these areas do not want their cash cow to be put to rest. Without the prisons areas like Auburn, Dannemora, and Attica would have no work. Of course the employment of these good Americans is more important that the lives of these men and their families.



posted on Feb, 9 2009 @ 09:11 AM
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reply to post by redhead57
 


Good insight.

As well as the privatization of many prison facilities. More Gov't spending, awarding huge contracts for insiders.

Remember the Cheney attempted indictment in Texas?
Cheney, Gonzales Indicted in Texas Prison Case

and recently,

Officer: Inmates riot again at West Texas prison

PECOS, Texas (AP) - Inmates at a privately run federal prison in western Texas started a riot and set at least one fire Saturday for the second time in less than two months,


Inmates at Texas Prison Riot, 'Take Over Compound'

Inmates Take Hostages, Start Riot in Texas Prison

One of the hostages was released late Friday. Both prison employees are recreation specialists


"specialists"



[edit on 9-2-2009 by imd12c4funn]



posted on Feb, 9 2009 @ 09:19 AM
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This is a good thing, The Rockefeller laws are a conspiracy of themselves along with the entire war on drugs. It's not that our country is against drugs, it's that the profits made from those drug sales aren't getting to the hands of the elite. It's being cut out and it doesn't like being cut out.

If the elite in this country were able to get what they see as their fare share of drug profits, the laws surrounding the import and sale of drugs would vanish overnight.



posted on Feb, 9 2009 @ 09:31 AM
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I am sure it is the Corrections Corporation of America that is running that facility for the feds. Corrections is a billion dollar industry, really it is nothing but modern slavery! NYSDOC pays men literally cents an hour to do work such as manufacturing, welding, and assembly while the trucks roll in and out with good produced at slave wages!

It is ridiculous the way this system is set up altogether. The very things that prevent recidivism are the things they discourage. Programs for training and education have been slashed, visitors are regularly treated poorly thus discouraging familial support, and the unfair prices charged by the telecommunications companies that provide calls home! Imagine in this day and age it costing more than $3 for a call a short distance for only 30 minutes!!!!

It is a racket pure and simple. I am not in any way saying that those that are dangerous or have committed serious crime do not deserve to be incarcerated. But to jail a man for stupid drug infractions instead of offering treatment is insane. Given the billions of dollars it is costing to house, feed and maintain security on over one million people you would think in this economy this would be a far bigger issue. red



posted on Feb, 9 2009 @ 10:04 AM
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reply to post by redhead57
 

While I agree marijuana offenses should not garner jailtime, I disagree with your take here. Those prisoners are lucky to have that pennies on the hour job, and they are not slaves producing slave labor, they are paying for their crime.

I hope the Rockefeller laws are done away with.



posted on Feb, 9 2009 @ 12:26 PM
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If they were provided with necessary items such as deodorant, toilet paper (more than one roll a month) soap, shampoo, toothpaste and the like then perhaps. IF they are doing work around the prison that is fine too, but to use them to make furniture and other things to be sold on the market isn't that taking jobs away from people who need them???

No matter what these people are human beings and deserve some sort of fair treatment. Remember, most murders, rapists, and violent criminals are going to be released. Given the way they are treated and the rage that is in every man released, you would think we would learn something from other nations that treat their prisoners humanely. There recidivism rates are nothing compared to ours. It is a systemic problem.



posted on Feb, 9 2009 @ 12:41 PM
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Back in the 60's you would serve less time for murder than for selling pot.

A 20 year sentence for selling drugs with no hope of parole was normal.

Anything other than 1st degree murder usually got you out of prison in 5 to 9 years served.

That seems totally absurd to me.

It will be a step in the right direction when the Rockefeller laws are null and void.



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