'Free Energy' DIY Anyone?

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posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 05:16 PM
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I'm sorry that I posted in an unwanted discussion, I was wrong to do that. I'll respect the disire not to want to be exposed to all opinions, but I didn't insult your opinions, don't call mine drivel. I'll leave this thread, sprry about posting.



XL5

posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 05:18 PM
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RogerT, I personally have my beef with Bendini stuff. If he says you can't loop it, its not free energy. I'm an electronics Eng. and if you have a pulsed output coil, you just need a bridge rectifier and wind the output coil so that it makes the output current/voltage a tiny bit above the input. For example: input= 12V at 1A (avg.), wire the output coil to make about 13.3V at 1.2A (avg.).

As for parts, find out what day is garbage pickup day and find the parts. For small magnet wire, try the fan from a microwave, you can strand this wire for more current. SCR's OLD microwaves, treadmills and big photo copiers. Low voltage capacitors, try computer power supplies and car audio amps. Power transistors UPS systems, car audio amps, big photo copiers, electric scooters/wheelchairs and TV's.

www.datasheetarchive.com... great link for parts look up.



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by RogerT
 


Here's a brief clip from James May BBC series Big Ideas, and shows steel being melted by sunlight. He also visits an amazing solar farm in Spain which is starting to produce enough energy to power a town.
I appreciate it's not quite what your looking for RogerT but I thought you could find it an interesting watch . The full episode is available here on the BBC iplayer if your interested

www.bbc.co.uk...




[edit on 7-2-2009 by moocowman]



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 05:26 PM
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posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by XL5
 

XL5 - If I told you to bring a 7,500 gallon fuel tank and you show up with an eighteen wheeler and an empty tank, and I hand you a 1/8th inch tubing, and said, "put that in your tank," and then I ran the other end into my one-gallon tank, and in less than a minute, your tank were suddenly full of gasoline, how would you react?

Now, what if I showed you that my one-gallon tank is still full?

Did I take a one-gallon tank and fill an 7,500 gallon tank?

Nope. My one-gallon tank still has its gas.

What I did was to trigger the 7,500 gallon tank, using a circuit, to fill itself. I told the 7,500 gallon tank to pull the fuel from the vacuum, and it filled up so fast, almost instantly, without visible input, that you are stunned.

Nothing is free. I had to use a tiny bit of my one-gallon gas can to trigger the circuit, and the 7,500 gallon tank gushed to fill itself.

Scientists, engineers, and physicists would look at the 1/8th inch tubing, and discount the possibilty outright, as it is clearly impossible to transfer 7,500 gallons from a one gallon tank, and not only that, even the small diameter of the tubing further prohibits such a transfer.

And they are correct. But they start choking because they can't see or understand how it works. They can't trust their own formulas, calculations, or instruments. After all, the transfer flow meter showed an negligible flow from the one-gallon can to the 7,500 gallon tank. Yet, the 7,500 gallon tank is full!

They can only measure what "shows up" in the tank. And it drives them crazy!

Radiant energy is exactly opposite of the standard, transverse EM energy we are all familiar with. Opposite. I can't stress that word enough. Opposite.

Instead of things heating up, they cool. Instead of impedance in a circuit creating heat and losing energy, with radiant energy, it cools, and additional energy is piling into the circuit! At every point of impedance, more energy, gobs of it flows into the circuit. You can't see it. You can't measure it fully. You can only note that the tank is suddenly full.

Makes no sense does it?

Yet now you know more about radiant energy thatn 99.999999% of the scientists, engineers, and physicists know.


XL5

posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 06:11 PM
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Dooper, if a system can fill a gas tank with a tiny trigger energy, I don't care how it did it, but I would want to know how to build the trigger. Without knowing how it did it, it would not be easy to make. As long as I can copy the device, I could care less where the energy comes from or how it works. I just wanted to know if you measured the input/output energy and not just the voltage, I intended no offence or disbelief.

If it can not be looped and uses lead acid batteries, I won't believe it. Most older lead acid batteries have a bit of hard sulfur on the plates, so if a circuit can disolve that layer, it will look like free energy. If they used a large capacitor and it could be looped back, sure, I'd personally buy a device to copy off of.

I agree with the cooling effect but not with the fact it can not be measured, because if it can not be measured, does that mean it cannot be used in electric motors as well. If it can fill a battery, it should be able to fill a capacitor, thus if the trigger runs on 12V and outputs 13V, it can be looped even if you do need an inverter.



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 06:47 PM
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reply to post by XL5
 

I'm sure you're not the only one who'd like to have the schematics. A man spent many years and well over a million dollars just learning how to do this, and suddenly he's going to provide the schematic?

I kind of doubt it. Oddly, he has shared everything necessary to build it, and no one wants to follow simple directions. No one wants to invest the time to learn. They already know what's possible, and what's not.

A battery/bank is just a simple, off-the-shelf method of storing the enormous amounts of energy, and in turn, use an inverter so that standard appliances can be used in the form they already exist. No mystery there.

Desulfication of batteries, and their improved storage and performance has nothing to do with Radiant Energy. It's just a side benefit that comes with the territory. Why toss it out?

The chargers will not contain the circuit you seek. It's been limited, to do certain things.

However, for one who seeks to run a home off the grid, this is by far the most efficient method possible. And you can run off the grid for decades.

If I can figure out how to loop it, then I know you can.



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 08:19 PM
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The problem you are going to run into is, anything that will do what you want it to do, will be expensive.

Solar energy is a great source for [supplemental energy, but it is unreliable. At best, you average 12 hours a day sunlight (averaged over a year). The efficiency of available solar panels versus their price at anything other than a wholesale level is prohibitive. And a cloudy day tends to make a lot less solar electricity. In short, to make a home work off the grid based on solar energy, you would have to have a massive battery bank, a huge inverter to change the DC into AC household current, and tremendous overkill when sunlight is available to make up for the down times.

I think you mentioned a lack of running water in your area, so hydro-electric is out.

Wind is probably your best bet if there are steady winds where you live. But in order to have something that will remove you from the grid, you will have to have something a lot bigger than the mostly ornamental units I find most people tend to think of for wind energy. Also, you can't rely solely on the wind either (although it can be much more reliable than solar) since there are usually calm days in most areas. That means we're back to the battery bank and inverter.

It's more than just having the money to go out and buy what you want; the thing you seem to be wanting doesn't exist yet. Is it possible? I would say yes, absolutely. Is it available? Sadly, no. If you want to know why, my impression would be that it is simply not financially feasible for the average person to research something like this, go through the rigors of obtaining a patent, then trying to find someone who will be willing to put up the cash to build them for resale. A small manufacturing facility will cost at least $1,000,000 to set up and a nice additional chunk of change to operate. No one works for free. I have a research facility I build privately. It took over 7 years of living like a pauper while driving over the road (pretty good money) to get it to where it is now, which is still a long way from what I really need.

Now, think about this: you now know someone who is trying to create a real home energy production device. That person (me) has spent almost a decade of his life sacrificing in order to try and do it. He has spent untold amounts of cash on materials for various experiments and for tools and equipment to allow him to work with those materials. He has invested his time, his energy, and his constant thought into the research.

I'm not gonna let something like this go for anything under 8 figures. If I can't get that, I'll build one for myself and watch while everyone else's lights go out but mine. I doubt any other inventor would feel any different.

With a little luck, maybe soon you can go out and buy a 'miraculous' device that will remove you from the grid. For now though, it takes more than money: it takes knowledge too.

TheRedneck



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 09:02 PM
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Look. You have two separate battery banks that the home will run on, and an automatic controller. You run your home off of one bank while the other is charging. Your source for your charger, which is also run off a small, third bank of batteries, is maintained by a small solar charger.

Your batteries through scalar charging have much more charge, much more life, and much more efficiency than any other charging system anywhere. Much, much longer life. Very much longer life. This is much different than a normal battery charger.

And your banks will recharge faster than you would believe, and use far less energy than any other charger will give you.

Depending on your funds, you can opt to purchase heavy duty, deep draw batteries, or move up to large batteries that have been pulled from microwave towers. They can be brought back to better than spec using these chargers.

You can also break up your circuits and use multiple inverters. Just like you have different circuits in you home, controlled by circuit breakers, different inverters that are smaller are also less expensive, and therefore you keep the cost down.

Starting to get the picture?

[edit on 7-2-2009 by dooper]



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 09:45 PM
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Geothermal is the most viable option out there at the moment.
It can either be closed loop by laying line in the ground, or use wells.
Research geothermal.

Solar cannot pay itself off currently unless you live in the desert. Wind is a similar situation to solar, unless you live somewhere very windy all the time.

A 25 degree difference in temp between air and what you pump through the ground is enough to be viable. Which is most of the year in most places. It will not make you totally independant of the grid, but you can overscale it and sell back to surplus to the grid, turning a profit on the output, and paying it off in short order.



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 10:29 PM
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Originally posted by houdanny
I have researhed very very thoroughly into overunity and perpetual motion for a paper I wrote. Its impossible to get something from nothing. The laws of thermodynamics prohibit it, and they're the most proven ideas of science. Use solar power to knock of some of the cost, but if you want a long term solution I suggest getting a radiactive powerhouse. They resently came out with miny ones that can power a block for years and years.It will be pricy though. Sorry I don't have a link, but google will proby turn up some answers.


Not impossible, only impossible in the human mind. Remove "nothing" and you have possibilities endless. In the Universe, there is no such thing as "nothing". Everything is something, therefore you can get energy, from something. It is up to you to find the "how".



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 11:09 PM
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a very cheap and practical machine:

www.wavepartner.eu...



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 11:12 PM
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reply to post by RogerT
 


Hey Roger... I have been experimenting with a generator I invented... on a small scale I can power a small led for a little while with a very small input of power. If you are interested in experimenting and developing let me know.



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 11:21 PM
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If anyone thinks that obtaining power out of the air is impossible, let me share this.

Run 200' of fine, insulated wire, the higher above the ground, the better. You can string it straight, and you can coil it to shorten the stretched length.

This wire will load up with thousands of volts, obtained from the atmosphere. No amps, but lots and lots of volts.

Run one end to the top of a spark plug. Take another, short piece of wire and connect it on one end to the "thread" area or the tip of the sparkplug, (ground) and run it to an old automobile coil, but connect it in reverse. You want to convert the automobile coil into a step-down transformer, thus the connection to the - side of the coil.

Run another wire from the + side of the coil to the positive of a battery you wish to charge. Ground the battery by grounding the negative post of the battery.

In two to three days, the battery will become fully charged.

Thousands of volts accumulate in the 200' section of wire. When voltage gets sufficient, it will jump the air gap of the sparkplug, travel to the coil, reduce the voltage and increase the amperage, and jump into the battery.

All from static electricity.

This is cheap and easy enough for anyone to do.



posted on Feb, 8 2009 @ 01:30 AM
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posted on Feb, 8 2009 @ 01:50 AM
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Originally posted by dooper
If anyone thinks that obtaining power out of the air is impossible, let me share this.

Run 200' of fine, insulated wire, the higher above the ground, the better. You can string it straight, and you can coil it to shorten the stretched length.

This wire will load up with thousands of volts, obtained from the atmosphere. No amps, but lots and lots of volts.


your design will probably not work that well. you need to add a rectifier and a capacitor into the circuit. static electricity may be negative or positive so you need to make sure you only harvest the correct polarity.

alternatively you can add 2 rectifieres and 2 capacitors connected to the long wire in opposite directions.

even with the enhanced version you'll probably get very little charge and it would take weeks to fully charge a battery.



posted on Feb, 8 2009 @ 02:04 AM
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reply to post by danman23
 


Yes, certainly, I'd be interested in taking a look at anything that seems promising.

I'm on a very steep learning curve here, so my pace may seem a bit slow at first.

I feel like when I started the house project and the first thing on the cards was to learn architecture together with passive construction techniques whilst at the same time sourcing materials and dealing with local beaurocracy



posted on Feb, 8 2009 @ 02:07 AM
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reply to post by houdanny
 


Majordisaster is right. New theories and discoveries in the study of "free energy" are more prevalent than ever. Zero Point Energy is a leading example. Google it. Fascinating stuff.
It is true the Law of Conservation, as it is written, prohibits the existence of a perpetual motion device. As you say, "can't get something for nothing." But, then if you try to apply this rule to, say ... gravitational theory ... It's a bust. If gravity is pulling on us at a constant rate, where does the energy needed to do so come from? Something for nothing? And please don't go all "string theory" on me. If a theory cannot stand alone, without "unique calculations for very special circumstances that can't be explained within the confines of the basic theory" then it doesn't stand up to the scientific method and should be abandoned.
My point is simply to keep an open mind and apply the tried and true as you would to any theory.

By the way, solar has become a more cost effective renewable energy source than it used to be. I'm generating 500 watts - 12VDC nominal converted to 120VAC nominal with panels I made from a lot of "broken" cells purchased on Ebay. (Despite the term, not all are beyond repair and of 55 cells only 5 were unusable) The "manufacturing" of a panel is a simple process, really. Just a matter of some soldering and a little carpentry.
It cut my electric bill literally in half.
Sounds like you have the will ... now gain some practical knowledge and you're on you way. Good luck to you.



posted on Feb, 8 2009 @ 02:23 AM
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Originally posted by XL5
Dooper, if a system can fill a gas tank with a tiny trigger energy, I don't care how it did it, but I would want to know how to build the trigger. Without knowing how it did it, it would not be easy to make. As long as I can copy the device, I could care less where the energy comes from or how it works. I just wanted to know if you measured the input/output energy and not just the voltage, I intended no offence or disbelief.

If it can not be looped and uses lead acid batteries, I won't believe it. Most older lead acid batteries have a bit of hard sulfur on the plates, so if a circuit can disolve that layer, it will look like free energy. If they used a large capacitor and it could be looped back, sure, I'd personally buy a device to copy off of.

I agree with the cooling effect but not with the fact it can not be measured, because if it can not be measured, does that mean it cannot be used in electric motors as well. If it can fill a battery, it should be able to fill a capacitor, thus if the trigger runs on 12V and outputs 13V, it can be looped even if you do need an inverter.


Forgive me again for my lack of accurate knowlege, but I do think you should join the group and build an SSG along with me. From your experience and knowlege should only take you a day or two.

Bedini talks about the output being a pulsed spike, I think at around 400V, and it's a chemical process in the batteries that captures this radiant energy, so it's not as simple as 12V in and 13V out.

He also comments that knowlege in current electronic thinking is a liability rather than a help. Somehow, I doubt that's an absolute, but I expect you have to be willing to re-examine much of what you've been taught.



posted on Feb, 8 2009 @ 02:45 AM
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Originally posted by TheRedneck
The problem you are going to run into is, anything that will do what you want it to do, will be expensive.


Yes, I'm aware there will need to be some money spent on the journey




Solar energy is a great source for [supplemental energy, but it is unreliable. At best, you average 12 hours a day sunlight (averaged over a year). The efficiency of available solar panels versus their price at anything other than a wholesale level is prohibitive. And a cloudy day tends to make a lot less solar electricity. In short, to make a home work off the grid based on solar energy, you would have to have a massive battery bank, a huge inverter to change the DC into AC household current, and tremendous overkill when sunlight is available to make up for the down times.

I think you mentioned a lack of running water in your area, so hydro-electric is out.

Wind is probably your best bet if there are steady winds where you live. But in order to have something that will remove you from the grid, you will have to have something a lot bigger than the mostly ornamental units I find most people tend to think of for wind energy. Also, you can't rely solely on the wind either (although it can be much more reliable than solar) since there are usually calm days in most areas. That means we're back to the battery bank and inverter.


I had come to the same or similar conclusions.



It's more than just having the money to go out and buy what you want;
the thing you seem to be wanting doesn't exist yet.


Well it doesn't exist on the open market, that's for sure, but I have a feeling 'the truth is out there' in some form or another.


If you want to know why, my impression would be that it is simply not financially feasible for the average person to research something like this, go through the rigors of obtaining a patent, then trying to find someone who will be willing to put up the cash to build them for resale. A small manufacturing facility will cost at least $1,000,000 to set up and a nice additional chunk of change to operate.


Exactly my point in the OP. I really believe this, combined with petty ego and greed, is the reason we are still grid dependent.


No one works for free. I have a research facility I build privately. It took over 7 years of living like a pauper while driving over the road (pretty good money) to get it to where it is now, which is still a long way from what I really need.


That's highly commendable, my hat off to you my friend.


Now, think about this: you now know someone who is trying to create a real home energy production device.


That makes 3 so far on ATS that I'm aware of.


That person (me) has spent almost a decade of his life sacrificing in order to try and do it. He has spent untold amounts of cash on materials for various experiments and for tools and equipment to allow him to work with those materials. He has invested his time, his energy, and his constant thought into the research.

I'm not gonna let something like this go for anything under 8 figures.


I can't for the life of me comprehend why anyone believes they either need or want '8 figures'. Unfortunately, most have to waste the better part of their lives making it big financially in order to realise that life was never about that and it didn't fulfil even a fraction of their expectations.

At least you are going about it doing what you love, so hats off again to you.


If I can't get that, I'll build one for myself and watch while everyone else's lights go out but mine.


Forgive me, but this is the petty ego part of the equation I mentioned above. I sincerely believe if you can let go of this attachment, you will have breakthroughs in your research.


I doubt any other inventor would feel any different.


Unfortunately, as a generalisation that's probably accurate. Fortunately, it's not universal, and some people have managed to get beyond this point and are willing to accept that their work is a contribution to humanity. In fact, it's a joy to do so.



With a little luck, maybe soon you can go out and buy a 'miraculous' device that will remove you from the grid. For now though, it takes more than money: it takes knowledge too.


I think you have mis-judged me as someone with pots of cash looking to buy a gadget for my own use. If I represented myself this way, I apologize, it was unintentional.

edit to fix tags

[edit on 8/2/09 by RogerT]





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