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How to Build an Upside-Down Fire

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posted on Feb, 6 2009 @ 11:43 PM
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We are all familiar with building the typical "tipi" fire. I found a completely different approach, that i haven't as of yet tried. Described as the "Upside-Down Fire. At first i thought it was a joke, but apparently this setup is more efficient and effective, creates a longer lasting fire that gives off more heat.

In prep for the worst case scenario, this technique might come in handy.
Those who have experimented with this, please share your experiences.

[edit on 6-2-2009 by The All Seeing I]




posted on Feb, 6 2009 @ 11:47 PM
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That video was horrible. There was no instruction on how to make the fire and no clear pictures of it's structure. I saw 5 logs on fire and not much else.



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 12:02 AM
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reply to post by stikkinikki
 


Scroll down and read the page. Then come back and respond.
There is plenty of information, and pictures, and commentary, and other peoples comments. Take a little time, and read the link!

I think I'll try it this weekend. It's cold, and I've got plenty of wood..


[edit on 7-2-2009 by spacedoubt]



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 12:09 AM
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You have to scroll down to the 5 min video to really get any information. It does go against how I learned as well, but it might have some merit as it seems to work on the idea of building your coals to fall on the next progressively bigger pile of wood. Which is what we do with a sustained tipi fire. Once a good coal bed is set you can just throw anything small down to cause a flame to spring up fairly fast.

Worth a try I suppose. But to err on the side of caution, try it early so you still have time to build a traditional fire before it is too dark out to find enough wood.



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 01:29 AM
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Okay, I'm the padawan here so don't laugh.

Two questions.

1) Does this method work exclusively in fireplaces?

2) Why aren't all fires made this way? It seems a most efficient method.

[edit on 7-2-2009 by Nirgal]



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 02:45 AM
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very dope! To answer the question to one of the posters above aboutmaking it an outdoor fire...it is impractical to do with this method;UNLESS, you build what is called a 'mini-cabin' around the top of the kindle, to prevent air from blowing it out(pretty much a little wall until the fire starts to burn. So YES, you can use it outdoors, you just have to make sure you do that.
Ima impress the ladies with this, and even make a few of the men somewhat jealous(which is always good).



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 03:14 AM
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People in survival situations are very stressed often cold, wet and tired possibly injured and possibly suffering from shock, A fire is a great way to improve their situation. But it needs to be simple to start and easy to maintain and without fancy ergonomics.



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 04:20 AM
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I was very sceptical when I first heard this on a TV show last year, but I have been using this method in my stove at home for almost a year now, and I have to say IT WORKS GREAT!

This tip posted by a member on the referenced website is much more efficient though (for indoor or outdoor fires):

From Kalavic:

“For outdoor application, I recommend doing a mini “log cabin” on top of the fire-starters with a small gate surrounding them to prevent a draft from snuffing out the fire in it’s infant stages.”



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 05:33 AM
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reply to post by Northern Raider
 


So, basically a great idea for an established camp requiring several hours use but not so for instant/on-the-move situation?



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 06:54 AM
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Originally posted by Nirgal
reply to post by Northern Raider
 


So, basically a great idea for an established camp requiring several hours use but not so for instant/on-the-move situation?



That is how I would probably play it, When you have just fled a city or your home in a hurry because of some horrible event, walked or driven for hours, you and your group are cold, tired, afraid and stressed to death, it could be raining or snowing or windy or icy cold or all of them combined, what you need is a very simple fire and a hot drink, nothing more fancy at that time.



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 07:22 AM
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There's a big difference between building and maintaining a fire indoors, in a fireplace vs an outdoor campfire.

The Scouts don't make their fires indoors, in fireplaces and they don't get to use "starter sticks" either, so in a real, outdoor survival-type scenario, go ahead and try this upside down fire, but only if there's Scouts camping nearby.



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 07:34 AM
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This isnt anything new folks. All it is doing is starting the fire at the top, and it burns its way down. It is not an upside down fire. It is a reverse starting fire.

It does burn the wood completely and leaves very little ash. It burns this way because the airflow is properly vented by the heat of the fire starting at the top..basic convection physics here....heat rises..pulls the cooler air from below...giving better oxygen feed to the pile of wood for a better burn.

I learned reverse starting fire decades ago from a old rancher who learned it from his grandfather and several generations back further.

One thing I noticed about this guy in the video and reading his article..he seems to me to be a bit "fire happy". Im not sure I would want him around my camp the way he touts about making big fires and watching it blaze brightly.



Cheers!!!!



posted on Feb, 7 2009 @ 07:37 PM
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As others have pointed out, the weakness to this approach is the initial flame being vulnerable to wind exposure. Though one could make a mini tipi at the top, just to get things started... or if available opening the top and bottom of a can as a temporary shield for the starter flame, may work even better.

As for the origins of this approach or the last it was common practice, i found one vague reference:



Since the early 1990s, it has become de rigueur among many in the business, and by extension, their customers, to build their fires top down.


source: www.woodheat.org...



posted on Feb, 8 2009 @ 03:18 AM
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if its fuel efficiency and maximum combustion that is needed in a hurry would it not be prudent to use one of those HOBO stoves, or billy Can heaters ?. I think some switched on dude posted a link to You tube a while back show how to make your own for a few pennies.



posted on Feb, 8 2009 @ 04:10 AM
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reply to post by Northern Raider
 

Not a one liner.

Hobo Stoves.



posted on Feb, 8 2009 @ 04:13 AM
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Originally posted by Nirgal
reply to post by Northern Raider
 

Not a one liner.

Hobo Stoves.


Thanks Nirg, this particular design I think is absolutely first rate, simple, lightweight,functional, reliable and cheap. Doesnt come much better really.



posted on Feb, 8 2009 @ 05:53 AM
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This is another top rate pice of kit that can use fuel very efficiently

www.kellykettle.com...



posted on Feb, 8 2009 @ 09:31 PM
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Impressive that kelly kettle and that russian-doll hobo stove made from a thermos... inspired me to do a little hunting in this direction. Found a mini furnace made from a pop can, not sure how practical this is, maybe to heat ones hands while establishing a couple glowing embers to start a bigger fire on a damp day... or to help start the upside down fire on a breezy day.



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