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How much water do you stock?

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CX

posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 05:08 AM
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I've recently started storing water for whenever it's needed, the biggest containers that we get in the shops here in the UK are 5 litres for 98p (Tesco if anyUKers are interested). They Best Before date gives me at least 2 years.

I just pop one or two in the trolley every time i'm shopping.

How do you calculate how much you are going to need when storing water though? Sorry, let me clarify, i am talking about general use at home if the utilities go down.

If we were talking about a survival situtation in the wildernes, we could use water treatment filtration units instead of having hundreds of gallons of water....which we couldn't carry out there anyway.

I was thinking, the water would be used primarily for drinking. Then comes cooking and hygiene. Do you work on a certain amount per day when storing?

Here at home i would imagine at least a litre a day each person for drinking, but i guess we could get away with less. You would'nt need to use water for cooking every day, and washing for hygiene (yourself nd clothes) you could reduce somewhat in a emergency situation so long as you don't forfeit your health.

Not forgeting if you have family, you'll have to multipy whatever you think you need for yourself.

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

CX.




posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 05:20 AM
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What a damn good sensible thread I hope the mods give you some bonus points.

OK A few points I have picked up on water storage

1 Over the years " healthy" bottled water has been found to be high on pesticides, aluminium phosphate, lead and cryptosporidium as a few examples. So I only trust water I have bottled myself.
2 In my house we have a cold water tank in the loft with 200 gallons in it, thats what would get used first if TSHTF.
3 I keep four x 35 litre water containers of the type used by Caravanners and motorhome users in the garage, which I fill up during times of high risk ( I dont leave em full all the time as they do go stale)
4 I also have three or four smaller bottles of the same type that carry about 8 to 10 litres, they are handy and often put into the BOV when extra water is needed.
5 ALL the potable water we keep is first filtered through a British Berkfeld water filter, and that includes the tap water.
6 The Polyprop Berkfeld is a superb piece of kit that is idead for home, retreat or BOVS, You can even buy extra supercer candles and make your own filter if you want.

www.avonsoft.com/Treatment/filters/gravity.htm



posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 05:22 AM
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You know, I'm not entirely sure how much you should have on hand in the event of an emergency or a survival situation. Lots.


I live in a dorm room - therefore I don't sore a whole lot of anything, except about 2 weeks worth of groceries and 1 weeks worth of perishables. I have a few stainless steel water bottles in the fridge - but that probably would only last me a day or so. (1L per person sounds low to me - but that's because I drink a LOT of water, I alone drink around 3L). I don't buy bottled water because most of it has Flouride in it, and I'm totally paranoid about flouride.

My parents however, have a well on the acreage with the River running along the property . Dad stores those big blue water bottles (25L?) in the cold room in case of emergency, I think he has 3 full ones. In the event of an emergency I'm sure that 75L would be sufficient for the short term and drinking, and since they're out of town and not on the town water - I'm sure the well would still work...wouldn't it?

In the event of a survival situation - I just hope to god the well still works...

- Carrot



posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 05:30 AM
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With a good water filter and knowledge of how to keep it clean then you have just stocked up a whole lake or body of water.
Other then that I don't stock water I just drink from the taps.

[edit on 4-2-2009 by DrumsRfun]



posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 06:10 AM
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Be careful on those fancy tap filters.

The main company that does them here likes to bragg how it won't remove fluoride...



posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 06:56 AM
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Simple answer, none.

There's the bath for home-storage. The Berkey for home use. The Katadyn and a 1.75 litre platypus for on-the-move. Worst case there's 20 litres storage in the solar shower.



posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 07:32 AM
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Originally posted by NuclearPaul
Be careful on those fancy tap filters.

The main company that does them here likes to bragg how it won't remove fluoride...


Aye most of the tap filters you see on TV and in places like boots only improve the taste of water, they dont actually improve its safety.



posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 07:39 AM
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Like a few others, no stock for water, just a Katadyn filter with a maximum of filtering 50,000 L, worst case it should still be 10,000 L and it's small.



posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 07:44 AM
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Got about 60 litres of water in the loft, a cool, dark place. Hauled em up on a rope and now they sit awaiting the dark times, if they even come that is


You'll theoretically get a long life out of water, even plastic. It won't taste nice after 5 years, but it won't kill you or make you sick.
Keep it out of the sunlight.
But for best results add a some bleach to each container (I forget the exact ratios but don't add more than a teaspoon!). This will kill any bugs or organisms.



posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 07:46 AM
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We have water bottles delivered and have a month supply all the time.



posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 07:49 AM
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I myself used to work on the theory of just having a bloody good filter would suffice, but then up here we had a little event called Chernobyl to worry about. the govt was saying everything is fine and dandy the air and water is clear, they said it the same time they banned the sale and transportation of most of the hill bred sheep on the pennines where most of our water comes from. It made me realise that as good as a filter is , if you are forced to hunker down, ( radiation, martial law, rioters, pollution etc) you are somewhat buggered if you can not get any water to run through the filter. so being a coward I played safe , I bought a filter and store water.



posted on Feb, 5 2009 @ 08:56 PM
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I'm fortunate enough to have an old well in the middle of my garden.

The house is completely surrounded by grapevines and the soil is chalky, a great filter.

The well is round, 1 meter wide, hand cut with slots in the walls every meter or so for decending using planks of wood (not me, fat chance!) and its 17.5 meters top to bottom.

The lowest I've measured it at was 3 meters of water and that was after a particularly dry summer.

Heavy work with a bucket but I plan on fitting a proper well pump run off a solar panel. I also plan on "dredging" it one day just to see what treasure I'll find in the silty bottom. I also want my coin back that I made a wish with.


The water is clear, very cold and tastes great. I also have some large cisterns which gutters feed into (20,000 litres+), they are used for the garden watering but usable for domestic in an emergency.

I think I'm covered but if I come up with any great ideas for you guys I'll let you know.

Adding a secondary loft tank may be a good move and would double the capacity of stored water up there. Would also benefit from regular circulation until supplies were cut so no regular replacing needed because it won't go stale.

How much is a black plastic water tank and some connectors these days compared to 10 or more smaller containers?

Good luck peeps and don't go thirsty eh......cheers.. nerb



posted on Feb, 5 2009 @ 10:25 PM
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We've got a half dozen or so four liter milk jugs that we keep with tap water in them. Every once in awhile, when my dad thinks it might be getting old, he throws it in the washing machine with a load or something, and fills them with fresh water, in case it's gone bad. I'd imagine that would be good for at least a few days, as long as we didn't mind smelling like we'd gone for at least a few days! Hopefully that would be enough to cook with, drink, etc, until we had reliable access to water again. We've got snow here for a large portion of the year as well, so if we had to, we could reliably use snow from about November to March, and probably longer, if it weren't for the last few years being so mild. Snow used to be reliable from about October to April fifteen or twenty years ago here.



posted on Feb, 5 2009 @ 11:35 PM
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I bought a really nice hand pump with a filter and i live next to a huge lake so i dont feel the need to store water. Im also right on the water table so any digging on my part will quench my thirst. And if for any reason there is no water left ill drink a can of Mtn Dew. I store Tons of that.



posted on Feb, 5 2009 @ 11:53 PM
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Don't have any ready filled, but I have 20 5G collapsible jugs ready to be filled when something does come up that looks like I might need it.

Would plan on filling the jugs from the hot water heater valve quickly.

Also, would fill a bathtub for extra cleaning water (about 55G), etc...

It is looking like the economy is tanking--that can result in a lot of turmoil on the supply side, so water, food, power, light, fuel, etc... are good things to be thinking about now, before it's too late.

delius



posted on Feb, 6 2009 @ 12:05 AM
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In a SHTF scenario you can always use the water in the back of your toilet tank as well as the water stored in your water heater. This is all "gray" water, you wouldn't drink it, but it would come in handy for washing clothes, hands, dishes etc. without having to tap into your clean drinking water.



posted on Feb, 6 2009 @ 12:18 AM
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I keep 350 gallons outside of the house in 55 gal food grade platic drums. In addition we also keep two hand operated filters with spare cartridges. Also water purification tablets as well.

We also keep smaller containers in the event we have to go mobile.

We are planning for my family of 3, my dad, and the older neighbor next door. If we have another child or add dependants we will add more water accordingly.

You also need to take cooking into account as many people have large stores of beans and rice etc.



posted on Feb, 6 2009 @ 12:20 AM
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Originally posted by Skamindy77
In a SHTF scenario you can always use the water in the back of your toilet tank as well as the water stored in your water heater. This is all "gray" water, you wouldn't drink it, but it would come in handy for washing clothes, hands, dishes etc. without having to tap into your clean drinking water.


Ah but you could if you had a filter. Water heater water is not really grey water as it comes straight from the municipal water supply.

I do not count on it in my planning as we are in earthquake country and the water heater may not make it



posted on Feb, 6 2009 @ 03:01 AM
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reply to post by CX
 


Water storage I store 55 gallons here, about 200 litres I think...in bulk.

In rotation I store about 20 gallon jugs that I run thru a dual filter
system and then store in the jugs.

When is empty I fill it and date, and drink from the oldest.

I think I go thru about a gallon every 2 or 3 days and I am only
moderately physically active most of the time.

For mobile purification on the move I use resublimated USP iodine
crystals in a 1 oz. bottle, learned it from the ppl at Hoods Woods.

For ppl allergic to shellfish I keep some bleach with me and an eye
dropper and I hear its about 10 -12 drops per gallon if it is fairly clear.

A slow sand filter for initial filtering, the bleach or crystals is to kill
anything living in the water, SODIS works too.

England used the slow sand filter for a long time, some say its still in use.

Slow sand filter

Another trick to kill what is living in the water is the SODIS method.

These are the backup methods I have here, and at my bugout location.

Good Luck to you all !



posted on Feb, 6 2009 @ 03:11 AM
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Originally posted by Darkice19
I bought a really nice hand pump with a filter and i live next to a huge lake so i dont feel the need to store water. Im also right on the water table so any digging on my part will quench my thirst. And if for any reason there is no water left ill drink a can of Mtn Dew. I store Tons of that.


Just a heads up here on soda pop, and many other drinks out there.

Study Finds High-Fructose Corn Syrup Contains Mercury

I had heard ppl talk about other issues with it as well.

Corn syrup linked to massive increase of diabetes

The stuff is in so many things it is amazing.

Ketchup, gatorade, pop, BBQ sauce, some ice cream, jelly, etc etc.

Might cut back on the stuff, I noticed a difference in under a month.



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