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Whalers attacked us with 'sound guns' claim conservationists

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posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 04:20 PM
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Whalers attacked us with 'sound guns' claim conservationists


www.timesonline.co.uk

The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society said that crew members of the whaler Nisshin Maru used the Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD) against rubber launches attempting to disrupt their yearly hunt in the Southern Ocean. The devices can cause nausea, disorientation and hearing damage.

The LRAD is a nonlethal weapon used for crowd control by security forces, as well as by ships travelling through pirate-infested waters. It consists of a round disc that directs a beam of shrill sound, extremely loud and off-putting at a range of several hundred yards, and capable of causing permanent ear damage at close range. “This is a military-grade weapon system that sends out mid to high-frequency sound waves designed to disorient and possibly incapacitate personnel,” Sea Shepherd said in a statement.
(visit the link for the full news article)



[edit on 3-2-2009 by DimensionalDetective]




posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 04:20 PM
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Well, I suppose this is better than the last group that SHOT the captain of the conservationist ship that was opposing them.

It's amazing to me that this type of barbaric butchering of whales is still going on in these modern times legally, with no repercussions. So many species have been driven to near extinction in the past from these grotesqueries, and yet certain groups can still go out there and slaughter them for sport.

It's no better than their slaughtering of the dolphins that was part of that leaked footage a ways back.

I don't know if I agree with these conservationists doing what they're doing, but I do think this type of disgusting activity against these beautiful creatures needs to be internationally outlawed.

www.timesonline.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 04:41 PM
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Hey at least they're fighting and standing up for what they believe in, unlike the vast majority of the humans on this planet.

And to say at least, I cannot think of one product that once came from whales such as oil that used to be used in light bulbs that hasen't been replaced by something more modern, better, and not barbaric.

If all of the other countries have to abide by international law and not hunt whales, why is Japan the exception?

Good find by the way OP
[edit on 3-2-2009 by Dances With Angels]

[edit on 3-2-2009 by Dances With Angels]



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 04:51 PM
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Remember, people, that 6 billion PLUS people on this planet and they all want to eat and if that includes whales then whales will be on the menu, their other uses aside.

I agree that this barbaric hunt of whales and ALL ANIMALS is still being practiced in this enlightened age.

Sorry, but this is why the EARTH cannot tolerate, nor handle the greed, selfishness, unconcern and apathy of 6 BILLION PLUS people! Some of us just have to go. That's all there is to it, if there are to be any forests or food left on this planet. Is there even anything left in the oceans???? besides whales?

Terribly sad.....



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 05:01 PM
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Regardless of how you feel about whaling, the ocean is a really big place and there are no local police hanging out at the street corner, so to speak.

Ships at sea follow international treaties and admiralty law, and have been doing so for hundreds of years. Mariners understand the rich and long tradition of ship navigation, right-of-way, and sovereignty. When someone at sea harasses you, impedes your right-of-way, or in some way navigates to endanger you or your lawful operation, a ship's captain has every right to defend himself and his vessel, including the use of deadly force.

While the motives of the protesters may be noble, they are playing an very dangerous game using the tactics I have seen them use, especially on the Discovery Channel.

I'm very curious to know what would happen if a Japanese Coast Guard vessel was in the vicinity. I imagine you would see a wholesale arrest of a lot of protesters and an extended stay at a Japanese detention center. The Japanese, for better or for worse, see this as nothing more than simple fishing for a food product.

How would you feel if the rest of the world condemned us for eating lobster, and went out in a small navy of protest vessels and harassed our lobstermen just trying to earn a living?

Not saying killing whales is right, but these protesters better understand what they are getting into, and I have no tears for them when they whine about being mistreated or what not.....



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 05:15 PM
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Unfortunately, disrupting people at the task they do to earn a living is a dangerous thing, especially in international waters.

The solution of those 'protecting' the whales is a conscious choice. They know full well how bad things can go. I believe it is both a terrible waste of resources and an ironically a waste of time.

The net result of all this is 'propagandistic' at best. They really should address the issue at it's source. The DEMAND for whale meat and products. History has shown us, repeatedly, that if there is a demand, there WILL be a supplier. Whales have been prey for many cultures for centuries if not longer. Not all have continued the practice, why is that?

[edit on 3-2-2009 by Maxmars]



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 05:16 PM
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I have little sympathy for these conservationists. The simple truth is several generations ago they'd have been legally shot for harassment and nobody would have cared. You don't mess with someone's livelyhood. BTW, Indians in the Pacific Northwest retain the right to still have their annual whale hunts. They do it under the guise of tradition.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 05:26 PM
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Living in a state where whaling is actually a legal activity, I follow what Japan does in regards to whaling somewhat close.

Whaling is a very old, time honored tradition used by some folks who have lived in cold climates for centuries. Having have eaten whale, I can tell you its not what one would call "good", however, one mans whale is another mans veal I guess.

With that said, this area has very strict controlls over who can hunt whales, how they can be taken, and when they can be taken. Just like any other wildlife that is managed, and it works out rather well.

What Japan is doing is simply wrong in my eyes. I am not what you would call an animal lover, or a modern day environmentalist, however, to continue to use a resource so nearly depleated is very irresponsible. Similar to continuing to burn oil while not investing in other energy, just isnt logical.

I never side with organizations that annoy those seeking the safe, legal taking of wildlife, but in this instance I stand with the people on the boat. Japan laughed off the international whaling community a few years back when they were told to stop taking whales for "science" and they obviously show no signs of stopping.

Its sad that such blatant greed can exist in our world and species stand at the brink of disaster because of it.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 05:26 PM
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Originally posted by Maxmars
Whales have been prey for many cultures for centuries if not longer. Not all have continued the practice, why is that?

[edit on 3-2-2009 by Maxmars]


Fair question.

Look at the American market for whale products in the 19th and 20th centuries - it's predominantly oils, followed by baleen/whalebone to a lesser extent. Once substitute products were found - petroleum and petroleum based plastics - there was no longer a demand, and whaling stopped.

With the vast majority of former whaling nations, this was the situation - very few used the whales as food. The shift away from whaling was an economic one.

Japan and other whaling nations bought a lot of these nation's whaling fleets as they were decommissioned - before the international moratorium, of course. Nations that were in it for the oil got out. Nations that were in it for food stayed.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 05:44 PM
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My question is are they commercial whalers or natives or inuits??
Cough (2 lines)
Oops just read the article.I get it now.


[edit on 3-2-2009 by DrumsRfun]



posted on Feb, 4 2009 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 

S & F
I was taken back by the photo of a gracious sea creature soaked in blood.
Makes me feel lame, sitting here typing, when so many world problems need ALL of us working towards solutions...

Personally, I'm sending a small check to Support Sea Shepherd in the morning!



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