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Hey geology buffs- What is this?? (photos)

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posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 01:14 AM
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This piece of sandstone was found among a quantity given to me by my neighbor for a garden border. I have hauled them around the yard half a dozen times but only recently noticed this one, with it's strange imprint.

I did fossil searches of plants, fish, etc. and can find nothing similar. The length of the imprint is 8 in. and 2.5 in. across, at the top. Each line is almost exactly .25 in. apart. The depth is hard to guess, it varies slightly.

My brother's geology professor took a look at the photos and was not able to identify.

So there you have it. I hope someone out there in ATS land can shed some light.






[edit on 3-2-2009 by Pilot]




posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 01:32 AM
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Looks like a Trilobite.
this is a 2nd line
and this is a 3rd but not the first.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 01:51 AM
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Originally posted by Bringer
Looks like a Trilobite.
this is a 2nd line
and this is a 3rd but not the first.


Yep probably spot on. From the size it looks like a decent sized one also.
And for my 2nd line. WOOB WOOOB WOOB ( 3 stooges style)



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 02:15 AM
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This was my first thought, however it is not a trilobite. Imagine the kind of object that would create this pattern. I'm sorry the photos are not more detailed, but the indented lines are squared at the bottom.

I'm sorry that has been crossed off the list but thank you for responding.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 02:27 AM
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reply to post by Pilot
 


Erm a trainer shoe? :lol
o you know where your neighbour got it from? What do you think it might be?






[edit on 3-2-2009 by MCoG1980]



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 02:38 AM
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reply to post by MCoG1980
 

We are in North Central OK, these stones are all over the place, strewn about in fields, and some are very large. I don't know what it is. I keep looking for something, anything similar and can't find a thing.

I was thinking it might be helpful to make a cast of it, make it easier to visualize.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 02:44 AM
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Was it found in rock layers that also contain dinosaur footprints?

"Walking With Dinosaurs".... is Discovery Channel mocking us?



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 02:45 AM
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posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 02:27 PM
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it's the imprint of the Air Zeta shoe put out by Nike (the actual goddess) back in the day.

-



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 03:48 PM
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I'm not a geologist, but the two things that instantly came to mind upon seeing that picture (and before reading the other replies) were:

1) shoeprint
2) trilobite



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 03:50 PM
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I have a large collection of trilobite fossils...some of which are from Ada, Oklahoma. Most likely a trilobite



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 03:50 PM
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I've seen a lot of fossils...
But judging by all the parallel lines, I'd say it was a shoeprint.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 03:56 PM
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Looks to me like a dino foot print... Or more exactly a part of it. Gonna hit google now, I have an idea what I'm on about.

I'm looking for a picture, not found one yet, I'm thinking bipedal dino with feet devided into 3 pads - and that's the middle one. That would mean a rather large beast! say 10 - 12 foot tall?

[edit on 3/2/2009 by Now_Then]



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 03:58 PM
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Actually after looking at it a little more it does kinda resemble the front part of the sole of a shoe or boot. At least it does a little to me.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 04:57 PM
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Pilot:

The imprint in the pictures looks like a Cycad, termed a living fossil, and not to be confused with a palm or fern.

It would help to know the age of the sandstone in which this is found.
My best guess:
It does appear to be a plant, flora, and being found in sandstone would indicate, to me, that this particular specimen, a frond or branch, was in a near-shore environment. The frond may have been transported by wind, water, animal, to the surface of the body of water, where it became water logged and sank. It was probably rapidly covered by additional sand, where it was protected from wave action

One of the hardest things for a geologist is to determine something solely being shown photos. If you could possibly take it to a paleobotanist in your area, he/ she may be able to identify it. If you do make a cast, that would be ideal to take in addition to, or instead of the specimen.

Keep us posted as to your findings... the answer is out there.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 05:17 PM
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Pilot beat me to it ,it's a type of primitive fern/palm,thingy,fer sure

I was gonna say it was a pineapple just to be silly ,but I'll stick with the facts



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 05:21 PM
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It looks like it's part of a palm fron,
but the lines are almost perfectly parallel, and don't appear to be curved. So I don't think it's a trilobite.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 05:37 PM
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I know this would absolutely make no sense to found in limestone, but am I the only one that thinks that looks like the imprint left from an astronaut?

On a serious note. Did you notice any 'tool' marks left in the grooves? I'm thinking maybe relief cuts chiseled out for something grander, but never got finished.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 05:41 PM
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Just to throw something into the mix - it looks almost chiselled to me. Do you have a local stone mason past or present? It could be a practice stone or part of a larger piece.

Hope it is a Trilobite though as that would make it a great find.



posted on Feb, 3 2009 @ 05:41 PM
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I think you're right about it not being a trilobite. It sure looks alot like a shoe sole imprint though....but I suppose it could be some kind of plant imprint as well. Definately interesting....I hope you find an answer as I think we are all curious




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