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Too much television can make children 'mentally ill'

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posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 


Well, its true. Who are we kidding?

If I watch TV I want

- To look like Paris hilton
- To party like Paris hilton
- To own an Ipod
- To own the latest mini skirt fashion
- To eat at Benny's or Mcdonalds
- Get a credit Card
- Take pills and medication

And when I get on the internet?

Im bombarded with

- sexual popups
- sexual propositions
- popularity competitions

When I left highschool the internet had just come to common people.
On my 486SX 33Mhz PC I was playing commander Keen, I was watching movies like ' independance day'.

Mobiles werent around, Paris was still being taught the finer points in life '' even though it didnt work '' and that mental condition you had, that was called

'' life ''

Todays youth are messed up, it sucks, because they are tomorrows leaders!




posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 04:05 PM
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offtopic:

commander keen rocked..
so did the original mech warriors.

on topic:

Tv reminds me of booze in a way (in relation to the government)..

spend money to produce it... spend money to fight it.. all while keeping the masses pacified.

oh.. simpsons should be on soon



posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by flyindevil
Please list alternatives to television and video games.


But you're missing the point. Why do they even have this tendency to desire television and video games at all? It's not just because they exist and they're addicting. Giving them an alternative doesn't accomplish anything.



posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 04:16 PM
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This stuff isn't new. Check out "Video Violence and Children", published in 1986 by Geoffrey Barlow and Alison Hill. It drew a direct relationship between violent video content and reciprocal behaviour in children.

One of the main ideas expressed is that, video violence doesn't make children violent but it's more likely that any latent behavioural issues the child have will surface.

This was in the mid eighties, at the height of the 'video nasty'.

What I am wondering is those who where children then are adults now, possibly with their own children. Has this produced a second generation of video violence junkies, who have learnt that it's okay to experience adult material at a younger age?



posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 04:40 PM
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In my views, theres nothing wrong with TV and games, yea the shows on them mainly do suck, but there is some great ones too.

Like anything, moderation is needed.

But calling people mentally ill for watching it?? it's a personality, not a mental illness. Being materialistic and such is a personality factor, not an illness.

People should be aloud to watch as much as they want. If they become materialistic spoiled brats, thats their fault, and they can have mind dubbing conversations with people who are also materialistic, and people who dont watch as much TV can talk about other subjects.

I watch programs on the internet (no annoying adverts) and im fine and very open minded with theories (pretty much all i do on the internet is look at theories) and it aint turned me into a materialistic guy.

I enjoy playing my xbox 360, i dont go out and feel the need to go out and buy the latest games (infact, the latest one i brought was GTA 4)

Lets face it, their constantly blaming "bad" behavior on various different things. If its not TV/Games, its things in food, if it aint things in food, its the internet, if it aint the internet, its things in drink, if it aint drink, its music, if it aint music, its magazines, if it aint magazines, its books, and so on.

We've heard it all before.



posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by Trolloks
 


Actually, you bring up a good point... mental illness is in the eye of the beholder, and what the majority does defines what is sane in human society.

So, like everything else, it comes down to a matter of choice. If individuals choose to watch 12 hours of TV and play video games for 10 each day, it is their choice, and they will have the results. There are undeniable physical consequences to that form of activity, as well as social and probably mental.

So it may well come to pass in another 30 or so years that that kind of activity will be the norm, and the social structure will match it.

It is a cultural choice, as well. If we want a culture of the kind that results from massive TV/vid game activity, then so be it. If we want a culture that does not result from that, we as a people need to make sure it doesn't happen.

My personal choice is not in that direction. I watch TV and play escapist video games, but as has been mentioned, in moderation and by no means every day, and I spend lots of time doing physical things. But that's just my choice as an individual, it is no more or less 'ethical' or 'preferred' on the cosmic scale than the other.

In fact, an argument could be made... I get a lot less cactus thorns stuck in me, and cuts and bruises playing vid games than my other activity!



posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by DimensionalDetective

Too much television can make children 'mentally ill'


www.telegraph.co.uk

That study found: "Other things being equal, the more a child is exposed to the media (television and Internet), the more materialistic she becomes, the worse she relates to her parents and the worse her mental health."

The Good Childhood inquiry, compiled by more than 35,000 contributors is independent of the Church of England affiliated society but has been endorsed by the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams.

(visit the link for the full news article)


Funny Where they "SHE" are they saying girls only?



posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by DimensionalDetective
 


Good post and very relevant subject.
Whilst it being a handy babysitter,the television induces alpha wave hypnosis in the human brain after just one minutes viewing:


"If you experience "mind fog" after watching television, you are not alone. Studies have shown that watching television induces low alpha waves in the human brain. Alpha waves are brainwaves between 8 to 12 HZ. and are commonly associated with relaxed meditative states as well as brain states associated with suggestibility.

While Alpha waves achieved through meditation are beneficial (they promote relaxation and insight), too much time spent in the low Alpha wave state caused by TV can cause unfocussed daydreaming and inability to concentrate.

In an experiment in 1969, Herbert Krugman monitored a person through many trials and found that in less than one minute of television viewing, the person's brainwaves switched from Beta waves-- brainwaves associated with active, logical thought-- to primarily Alpha waves. When the subject stopped watching television and began reading a magazine, the brainwaves reverted to Beta waves"


Theres also a very interesting short film here which examines the negative effects of TV on the human brain including the induction of alpha wave hypnosis and confusing the fight or flight stimulus into a form of nervous hyperactive neuroses:
www.abovetopsecret.com...
Cheers



posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 06:46 PM
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Originally posted by mithrawept
This stuff isn't new. Check out "Video Violence and Children", published in 1986 by Geoffrey Barlow and Alison Hill. It drew a direct relationship between violent video content and reciprocal behaviour in children.

One of the main ideas expressed is that, video violence doesn't make children violent but it's more likely that any latent behavioural issues the child have will surface.

This was in the mid eighties, at the height of the 'video nasty'.

What I am wondering is those who where children then are adults now, possibly with their own children. Has this produced a second generation of video violence junkies, who have learnt that it's okay to experience adult material at a younger age?


Well that's what I'm saying..

I grew up on Pong, Pac Man, Hunt the Wumpas, Asteriods, Space Invaders, Vic-20's, Atari's Commodore 64's and 128's, TRS-80's and Tandy.

I grew up on Sesame Street, and Smurfs, and PBS, and Love Boat, and Hunter, and NightRider and Land of the Lost, and Aquaman (the prime time tv show with Patrick Duffy).

I also grew up playing Guns, or war, or whatever you want to call it. climbing trees, building forts and sneaking out implements with which to build a fire and cook a potato as a 4th grader.

I'm fine, and I spend the entire day staring at flat screens to this day.

I love digital media, and so does my son. It's not about how much time they spend doing something, it's about what else they do. I don't care if he spends all weekend playing WOW if he's doing his chores, making straight A's, devouring books, and is active in soccer during the week. .






[edit on 2-2-2009 by HunkaHunka]



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